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Author: Simon Schama
ISBN: 0394559487
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 948 pages
Publisher Alfred A. Knopf; 1st edition (December 13, 1991)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 541
ePUB size: 1742 kb
FB2 size: 1950 kb
DJVU size: 1426 kb
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eBook Citizens download

by Simon Schama


Simon Schama is a master

As no other recent historian of the revolution, Schama brings to life the excitement - and harrowing terror - of an epochal human event. Simon Schama is a master. Historians come and go, and while in academics, history has really only recently been elevated to the status of truly important for the well-rounded scholar, Schama delivers perhaps the strongest case why in "Citizens. He speaks to you in perfect narrative, and never forgets his audience.

Sir Simon Michael Schama CBE FBA FRSL (/ˈʃæmə/; born 13 February 1945) is an English historian specialising in art history, Dutch history, Jewish history and French history. He is a University Professor of History and Art History at Columbia University, New York. He first came to public attention with his history of the French Revolution titled Citizens, published in 1989

Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution is a book by the historian Simon Schama, published in 1989, the bicentenary of the French Revolution.

Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution is a book by the historian Simon Schama, published in 1989, the bicentenary of the French Revolution. The terror," declared Schama in the book, "was merely 1789 with a higher body count; violence. was not just an unfortunate side effect. it was the Revolution's source of collective energy. It was what made the Revolution revolutionary. In short, From the very beginning violence was the motor of revolution.

The problem with Simon Schama The problem is that what he really wants to do is present a TV series, he wants warm direct intimacy (view spoiler) with the viewer, he wants to be arch and witty to the camera, to be cleverish and entertain, but he's a bit lazy and doesn't want.

From one of the truly original scholars of our time, a landmark book: his magnificent and electrifyingly new history of the French Revolution.

Simon Schama is University Professor of Art History and History at Columbia University and the prize-winning author of seventeen books, including The Embarrassment of Riches, Citizens, Landscape and Memory, Rembrandt's Eyes, the History of Britain trilogy and The Story of the Jews.

Donated in Honor of Dr. Lionel V. Patenaude. Bibliography: p. 879-906. TABLE OF CONTENTS - Alterations: the France of Louis XVI - New men - Blue horizons, red ink - Absolutism attacked - The cultural construction of a citizen - The costs of modernity - Expectations - Body politics - Suicides, 1787-1788 - Grievances, Autumn 1788-Spring 1789 - Improvising a nation.

Simon Schama explores the forces that tore Britain apart during two centuries of dynamic change - transforming outlooks .

Simon Schama explores the forces that tore Britain apart during two centuries of dynamic change - transforming outlooks, allegiances and boundaries. From the beginning of July 1637, battles raged on for 200 years - both at home and abroad, on sea and on land, up and down the length of burgeoning Britain, across Europe, America and India.

Simon Schama is University Professor of Art History and History at Columbia University in New York

Simon Schama is University Professor of Art History and History at Columbia University in New York. His publications include Patriots and Liberators, The Embarrassment of Riches, Citizens, Dead Certainties, Landscape and Memory, and Rembrandt’s Eyes. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Dazzlin. timulatin. his is no ordinary boo. chama does not merely write brilliantly about people, about events, about the abuse of rhetoric, and about festivals and executions. He also chronicle with a dramatic burst of poetic imaginatio. .The virtues of this book in the coruscating brilliance of dazzling display of erudition and intelligence.

Instead of the dying Old Regime, Schama presents an ebullient country, vital and inventive, infatuated with novelty and technology -- a strikingly fresh view of Louis XVI's France. A New York Times bestseller in hardcover. 200 illustrations.From the Trade Paperback edition.
Moonshaper
If you're writing a book involving the French Revolution (as I did about the Bastille key Lafayette gave to George Washington) or just intensely interested in the political history of liberty, you'll not want to miss reading this book. Immense in scope at almost a thousand pages, it introduces many interesting aspects of the French Revolution I hadn't found elsewhere. Given the wide coverage of the book, I'll have to forgive the author the few minor instances where his facts are not 100% right or he turns to areas not exactly "page-turning." Still, this encyclopedic book serves as a starting point for those wishing to pursue scholarship of the numerous details of this momentous event in human history. Time and again, it is referenced in subsequent works on the subject, and it may not be too far off to call it the "Bible of the French Revolution." Very well done!
Mazuzahn
I'm almost embarrassed to write this review for fear that I'm going to sound the Americo-centric bumpkin, but here goes:
First, Schama's a great author and historian, and this is probably an excellent book. Friends of mine who've read it rave about it, and I've just ordered the print version.
Second, I'm a retired U.S. State Department Foreign Service Officer, and have no problem with English as spoken by non-Americans. However, I've just deleted this audio book from my iPhone as the reader has the most outrageous, Monty Pythonesque, upper class British accent I've ever heard. It's almost a caricature, and is so thick that I miss every third word he says, compounded by the usual alternative pronunciations of key words (the warning should have been the reader's frequent early reference to "tricklers" which, I finally figured out, is how the British pronounce "tricolors"). Worse, he makes an aggressive attempt to pronounce all French words (and, given that this is a history of the French Revolution, there are a lot of 'em) with what he believes is an authentic accent (and, in truth, this might be the way some French actually pronounce their words and names). Short of it is that I simply couldn't understand this reader and felt I was missing virtually all of the narrative, particularly when vehicular traffic noise was added into the mix (I read during my lengthy commutes to work). It was with great remorse that I hit the "delete" button, but the experience was simply getting too frustrating to continue.
Do yourself a favor and buy the book.
Llanonte
Reading "Citizens" made it obvious to me that the author is a subject matter expert on the French Revolution. Like most subject matter experts, Schama has developed strong opinions on the subject. In "Citizens", he isn't shy about asserting his own interpretation of the events before and during the Revolution. This interpretation may or may not entirely stack up with what you learned in school or through other readings on the subject. No matter; think of it as a compelling "professional opinion" on the Revolution worth your consideration and analysis. Whether a layman or serious student of the Revolution, I think you'll learn a great deal from this extensively researched work.

One of the reasons the French Revolution excites such interest even today is that it raises questions regarding how, in modern times, such levels of violence could be condoned and even actively promoted at the state level. Schama seems to agree with most historians, on this point at least, that the masses were essentially looking for people to blame for the persistently deplorable economic conditions following the great accumulation of national debt during the 1760s through 1780s. When the initial bloodletting did not improve matters significantly, more bloodshed logically had to follow, to peel back the layers of the supposed mass conspiracy that never truly existed. Eventually, improving military fortunes and the resultant expanding borders brought in the revenue needed to soothe the discontent and to allow the French to step back, assess the horrors that had been perpetrated, and eliminate the irrational headcases that continued to lobby for more bloodshed to no clearly evident practical end.

Where Schama asserts viewpoints counter to the mainstream is in numerous more focused treatments of the Revolution, such as the availability and exercise of royal privilege within the non-gentry (widespread according to Schama) or the significance of social drivers such as class for whether an individual chose to support or oppose the Revolution (insignificant according to Schama). These are argued cogently and usually with ample source material.

For most readers this book would probably rate five stars. I gave it four simply because I prefer a more detached treatment of historical topics, encouraging me to develop my own opinion. I really enjoyed the many hours spent reading this book.
Skilkancar
Simon Schama is a master. Historians come and go, and while in academics, history has really only recently been elevated to the status of truly important for the well-rounded scholar, Schama delivers perhaps the strongest case why in "Citizens." He speaks to you in perfect narrative, and never forgets his audience. He brings you along through the personal accounts of the makers and shakers of the French Revolution. In that, he doesn't paint with a broad stroke, but rather gives the stuff of the gutter-- Not just the absolute apropos of the term Terror in the French Revolution, but sheds light into the steely, cold, indifference to the lives lost in the name of the dreams of tomorrow. Simon Schama offers a glimpse into a history from the top in Versailles to the bottom of Marseilles. He writes though not for the purpose of capitalizing on a good story with gritty details, but to lend perspective when a people can live in mass hysteria, blinded by fear and loathing, ambitious to a fault, and reckless in recovery. All around, good buy.