» » The Migration of Ideas: Irish America and the Irish Cultural Renaissance, 1891?1916
eBook The Migration of Ideas: Irish America and the Irish Cultural Renaissance, 1891?1916 download
Other
Author: James Powell
ISBN: 3838377168
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 284 pages
Publisher LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing (August 9, 2010)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 328
ePUB size: 1682 kb
FB2 size: 1565 kb
DJVU size: 1734 kb
Other formats: docx azw lrf rtf

eBook The Migration of Ideas: Irish America and the Irish Cultural Renaissance, 1891?1916 download

by James Powell


This monograph rectifies this by examining how, why and with what consequences Irish cultural ideas were exported, particularly through the vector of lecture-tours, to the United States in the years between 1891 and 1916

ISBN: 978-3-8383-7716-2; Издательство: Книга по требованию. This monograph rectifies this by examining how, why and with what consequences Irish cultural ideas were exported, particularly through the vector of lecture-tours, to the United States in the years between 1891 and 1916. In tracking the evolution in how these ideas were presented, and in how they, and their proponents, were received, many facets of both Irish and Irish-American on in this pivotal era are revealed.

Irish America and the Irish Cultural Renaissance, 1891–1916

Irish America and the Irish Cultural Renaissance, 1891–1916.

This monograph rectifies this by examining how, why and with what consequences Irish cultural ideas were exported, particularly through the vector of lecture-tours, to the United States in the years between 1891 and 1916.

Learn More at LibraryThing. James Powell at LibraryThing.

Personal Information. in Modern History from the University of Oxford, The Migration of Ideas: Irish America and the Irish Cultural Renaissance, 1891–1916.

Irish literary renaissance, flowering of Irish literary talent at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th . James Stephens also wrote stories and poetry.

Irish literary renaissance, flowering of Irish literary talent at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century that was closely allied with a strong political nationalism and a revival of interest in Ireland’s Gaelic literary heritage. The renaissance was inspired by the nationalistic. Learn More in these related Britannica articles: Ireland: Cultural life.

The Migration of Ideas. Irish America and the Irish Cultural Renaissance, 1891–1916. Blurb/Shorttext: By the end of the nineteenth century, Ireland, as the result of mass emigration, particularly to the United States, had come to mean more than just the island itself. This reality has been acknowledged by recent scholarship; however, the transnational dimensions of Irish culture and identity, particularly during the self-reflective years of the Irish renaissance, have yet to be adequately documented and dissected.

For while the Irish question is usually defined in Anglo/Irish terms (those of conflict) it has more .

1 Statistical analyses of the migration are contained in Doyle, David . Ireland, Irishmen and revolutionary America, 1760–1820 (Dublin 1980), pp 51–76 ; Kennedy, Robert . The Irish: emigration, marriage and fertility (London, 1973); Miller, Kerby . ‘Emigrants and exiles: Ireland and Irish emigration to North America,’ P. Berkeley,, 1976, pp 367–385 ; Fitzpatrick, David, ‘Irish emigration.

The firm of James Powell and Sons, also known as Whitefriars Glass, were English glassmakers, leadlighters and stained glass window manufacturers

The firm of James Powell and Sons, also known as Whitefriars Glass, were English glassmakers, leadlighters and stained glass window manufacturers. As Whitefriars Glass, the company existed from the 17th century, but became well known as a result of the 19th-century Gothic Revival and the demand for stained glass windows. James Powell was born on 14th October, 1774 in Homerton, Hackney, East London.

By the end of the nineteenth century, Ireland, as the result of mass emigration, particularly to the United States, had come to mean more than just the island itself. This reality has been acknowledged by recent scholarship; however, the transnational dimensions of Irish culture and identity, particularly during the self-reflective years of the Irish renaissance, have yet to be adequately documented and dissected. This monograph rectifies this by examining how, why and with what consequences Irish cultural ideas were exported, particularly through the vector of lecture-tours, to the United States in the years between 1891 and 1916. In tracking the evolution in how these ideas were presented, and in how they, and their proponents, were received, many facets of both Irish and Irish-American self-conceptualization in this pivotal era are revealed. Yet, this work, ultimately, has an appeal and a scope that stretches beyond ethnicity; it further illuminates the dynamics that underpinned the formation of both the Irish and the American nations, as well as bearing witness to the lives, and narrating the stories, of a host of fascinating individuals who contributed to these gradual births.