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Author: Lucy Fischer
ISBN: 0231125011
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 352 pages
Publisher Columbia University Press; 1st edition (August 15, 2003)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 190
ePUB size: 1212 kb
FB2 size: 1558 kb
DJVU size: 1860 kb
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eBook Designing Women (Film and Culture Series) download

by Lucy Fischer


The image of woman is ubiquitous in Art Deco design - in sculptures, pottery, glassware, jewelry and lamps. Lucy Fischer argues that Art Deco style became a kind of trademark for the modern woman of the era.

From department store window dressings to the illustrations in the Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalogs to the glamorous pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazar, Lucy Fischer documents the ubiquity of Art Deco in mainstream consumerism and its connection to the emergence of the "New Woman" in American society.

Items related to Designing Women (Film and Culture Series). Lucy Fischer is director of the film studies program and professor of English and film at the University of Pittsburgh, and a former president of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. Lucy Fischer Designing Women (Film and Culture Series). ISBN 13: 9780231125017. Designing Women (Film and Culture Series). She is the author of Sunrise; Cinematernity: Film, Motherhood, Genre; and Shot/Countershot: Film Tradition and Women's Cinema.

Melodrama and Meaning: History, Culture, and the Films of Douglas Sirk. It also includes an excellent introduction by Lucy Fischer. Series: Rutgers Films in Print series (Book 16).

Designing Women book. 0231125003 (ISBN13: 9780231125000). Moreover, the Art Deco woman, as screen protagonist, was at her most radical in the mid- to late-1920s, as embodied by actresses such as Greta Garbo or, notably, The image of woman is ubiquitous in Art Deco design - in sculptures, pottery, glassware, jewelry and lamps.

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Lucy Fischer is director of the film studies program and professor of English and film at the University of Pittsburgh, and a former president of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies.

Lucy Fischer is director of the film studies program and professor of English and film at the University of Pittsburgh, and a former president of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. Библиографические данные. Designing Women: Cinema, Art Deco, and the Female Form Film and Culture Series. Издание: иллюстрированное.

Lucy Fisher (born October 2, 1949) is an American film producer

Lucy Fisher (born October 2, 1949) is an American film producer. She was previously Vice Chairman of the Columbia TriStar Motion Picture Group at Sony Studios, Executive Vice President of Worldwide Production at Warner Brothers, Head of Production at Zoetrope Studios and Vice President of Production at Twentieth Century Fox. She was described by actor Jack Nicholson as "this casually brilliant vice chairperson of Sony Pictures. The executive that no one flees at parties.

Art and motion pictures, Art deco, Women in motion pictures, Women in art. Publisher. New York : Columbia University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station17. cebu on February 22, 2019.

series Film and Culture Series. In Cinema by Design, Lucy Fischer traces Art Nouveau's long history in films from various decades and global locales, appreciating the movement's enduring avant-garde aesthetics and dynamic ideology. Fischer begins with the portrayal of women and nature in the magical "trick films" of the Spanish director Segundo de Chomón; the elite dress and décor design choices in Cecil B. DeMille's The Affairs of Anatol (1921); and the mise-en-scène of fantasy in Raoul Walsh's The Thief of Bagdad (1924).

Grand, sensational, and exotic, Art Deco design was above all modern, exemplifying the majesty and boundless potential of a newly industrialized world. From department store window dressings to the illustrations in the Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalogs to the glamorous pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazar, Lucy Fischer documents the ubiquity of Art Deco in mainstream consumerism and its connection to the emergence of the "New Woman" in American society. Fischer argues that Art Deco functioned as a trademark for popular notions of femininity during a time when women were widely considered to be the primary consumers in the average household, and as the tactics of advertisers as well as the content of new magazines such as Good Housekeeping and the Woman's Home Companion increasingly catered to female buyers. While reflecting the growing prestige of the modern woman, Art Deco-inspired consumerism helped shape the image of femininity that would dominate the American imagination for decades to come.In films of the middle and late 1920s, the Art Deco aesthetic was at its most radical. Female stars such as Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, and Myrna Loy donned sumptuous Art Deco fashions, while the directors Cecil B. DeMille, Busby Berkeley, Jacques Feyder, and Fritz Lang created cinematic worlds that were veritable Deco extravaganzas. But the style soon fell into decline, and Fischer examines the attendant taming of the female role throughout the 1930s as a growing conservatism challenged the feminist advances of an earlier generation. Progressively muted in films, the Art Deco woman―once an object of intense desire―gradually regressed toward demeaning caricatures and pantomimes of unbridled sexuality. Exploring the vision of American womanhood as it was portrayed in a large body of films and a variety of genres, from the fashionable musicals of Josephine Baker, and Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers to the fantastic settings of Metropolis, The Wizard of Oz, and Lost Horizon, Fischer reveals America's long standing fascination with Art Deco, the movement's iconic influence on cinematic expression, and how its familiar style left an indelible mark on American culture.