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eBook Hunter and Hunted: The Ed and Am Hunter Novels (Frederic Brown Mystery Library) download
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Author: Fredric Brown
ISBN: 0971818509
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 640 pages
Publisher Stewart Masters Pub Ltd; 1 edition (July 1, 2002)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 790
ePUB size: 1989 kb
FB2 size: 1546 kb
DJVU size: 1960 kb
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eBook Hunter and Hunted: The Ed and Am Hunter Novels (Frederic Brown Mystery Library) download

by Fredric Brown


The Fredric Brown Mystery Library deserves the support of all crime-fiction fans.

The Fredric Brown Mystery Library deserves the support of all crime-fiction fans. Ed and Am Hunter have been out of town too long.

Hunter and Hunted book. The Dead Ringer finds Ed and his Uncle Am on the road in a creepy murder mystery filled with vivid descriptions and authentic slang from the bygone days of the carnival. The Hunters take on a job for the Starlock Detective Agency in The Bloody Moonlight, and Ed finds himself alone in a disturbing rural setting that seems to include werewolves and radio signals from the moons of Jupiter. Finally, in Compliments of a Fiend, Uncle Am himself becomes the victim in a race against time.

by. Brown, Fredric, 1906-1972. Private investigators, Hunter, Ed (Fictitious character), Hunter, Am (Fictitious character), Detective and mystery stories, American, Detective and mystery stories, American, Hunter, Am (Fictitious character), Hunter, Ed (Fictitious character), Private investigators.

Fredric Brown was a popular American pulp writer whose work appeared in mystery and science fiction magazines of the 1930s through the 1960s. Hunter and Hunted: The Ed and Am Hunter Novels, Part One reprints four of his mystery novels that originally appeared in the period from 1947 to 1950.

Fredric Brown bibliography. The bibliography of American writer Fredric Brown includes short stories, general fiction, mysteries and science fiction stories. YouTube Encyclopedic. Hunter and Hunted: The Ed and Am Hunter Novels, Part One (2002), ISBN 978-718185-1-4, published by Stewart Masters Publishing, omnibus of The Fabulous Clipjoint, The Dead Ringer, The Bloody Moonlight and Compliments of a Fiend. Twenty years later that book was published, including both the columns and a selection of other uncollected fiction, poetry and non-fiction as

Home Fredric Brown Series: Ed and Am Hunter.

Home Fredric Brown Series: Ed and Am Hunter. 1. The Fabulous Clipjoint (1947) 2. The Dead Ringer (1948) 3. The Bloody Moonlight (1949) 4. Compliments of a Fiend (1950) 5. Death Has Many Doors (1951) 6. The Late Lamented (1959) 7. Mrs Murphy's Underpants (1963).

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The Fabulous Clipjoint: An Ed and Am Mystery Novel. Frederic Brown - The Best of Fredric Brown.

eForeword Fredric Brown’s The Fabulous Clipjoint, published in 1947, signaled . I guess I’d stalled by hunting, so I wouldn’t have to think.

eForeword Fredric Brown’s The Fabulous Clipjoint, published in 1947, signaled the beginning of a brilliant career as a novelist for a writer who had been writing pulp fiction for over a decade. Brown introduces an unlikely pair of amateur sleuths in 18-year-old Ed Hunter and his Uncle Ambrose, in pursuit of the murderer of Ed’s father on the streets of Chicago. The Fabulous Clipjoint won the 1947 Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America, and it was the first of a series of Brown novels about the exploits of Ed and Ambrose Hunter.

Summary Bibliography: Fredric Brown. 2 The Second Fredric Brown Megapack: 27 Classic Science Fiction Stories (2014). What Mad Universe (1949) also appeared as

Summary Bibliography: Fredric Brown. What Mad Universe (1949) also appeared as: Translation: Het Krankzinnige Heelal (1953).

Fredric Brown was a popular American pulp writer whose work appeared in mystery and science fiction magazines of the 1930s through the 1960s. Hunter and Hunted: The Ed and Am Hunter Novels, Part One reprints four of his mystery novels that originally appeared in the period from 1947 to 1950. The novels included in chronological order in this volume -- The Fabulous Clipjoint, The Dead Ringer, The Bloody Moonlight, and Compliments of a Fiend feature the uncle-and-nephew detective team of Ed and Ambrose Hunter, the only recurring characters in Browns longer fiction. The Fabulous Clipjoint was Browns first published novel and is as much a coming-of-age novel as it is a mystery novel. In the book, young Ed Hunter sets out to enlist his Uncle Ambroses aid in tracking down his fathers killer. In the process, Ed comes to terms with his upbringing in the slums of Chicago and finally escapes to a new life in the traveling carnival. The Dead Ringer finds Ed and his Uncle Am on the road in a creepy murder mystery filled with vivid descriptions and authentic slang from the bygone days of the carnival. The Hunters take on a job for the Starlock Detective Agency in The Bloody Moonlight, and Ed finds himself alone in a disturbing rural setting that seems to include werewolves and radio signals from the moons of Jupiter. Finally, in Compliments of a Fiend, Uncle Am himself becomes the victim in a race against time. The only clue to solving the mystery of his disappearance seems to be a passage in the works of paranormal investigator Charles Fort. Hunter and Hunted collects the early Ed and Am Hunter novels together in one volume for the first time ever. A second volume is planned that will collect the later novels and stories featuring the Hunters.
Gigafish
This book is one of the finest collection of mystery novels from a single-author who was never part of the hard-boiled trio, and even then had carved his own niche in the genre that, at times, seemed to outshine even his "mother" base, i.e. science-fiction. It is a genuine tragedy that the publisher went kaput after releasing this single volume of Frederic Brown Mystery Library, since it clearly shows that had they persevered in their venture we, the mystery lovers, were in a for a treat. The novels, individually, are acclaimed gems that hardly require any review. They are: -

1) The Fabulous Clipjoint: trying to solve a mystery of the most personal kind, the uncle-nephew partnership gets forged, and they learn a thing-or-two about themselves.
2) The Dead Ringer: another episode in the life of the duo, another solution which leaves life rather open-ended for them, again.
3) The Bloody Moonlight: trying to settle the mystery of possible signals from Mars, the matter gets complex with talks about a werewolf and the younger Hunter himself being suspected of murder.
4) Compliments of a Fiend: the vanishing of the senior Hunter becomes sinister as there are suspicions regarding am "Ambrose" collector who might be collecting Ambrose-s (including Ambrose Bierce) for a long time.

The mysteries are unique. The characters are authentic in all their flaws & strengths. The plotting & narratives are entirely realistic. In short, you would really like to find out the publishers of this volume to know why they had chickened out from publishing the subsequent volumes. Until some saint comes up to resume their venture, you are whole-heartedly recommended towards getting hold of this volume and immersing yourself therein.
Falya
Great stories. Some stereotypes for sure, but Brown writes without intending racism or sexism. He's sympathetic with his characters, except the bad guys. These novels will keep you guessing, while appreciating the style of the writing and learning more about the detective team trying to solve a mystery. The characters are sympathetic and not as hard edged, usually, as some "noir" crime writiers.
Ynye
In my opinion Fredric Brown is not only one of the best pulp mystery writers, he is one of the greatest story tellers of the last century. His writings take you on journeys that transcend time, guided by characters that make you want to know them more, and all while putting the pieces together on superbly sordid mysteries. The Ed and Am novels are my favorites and this book is a must have for any pulp fiction, mystery,or detective novel fan.
Fordrelis
After Hammett and Chandler, Fred Brown is the best hard-boiled detective writer of the Black Mask era. In this book, which contains several novels about a young man and his uncle in a world of murder, carnivals, freight trains, and dark alleys, the first novel is a classic, and all of them are highly enjoyable. For those of us who find modern detective novels too cutesy poo to stomach, and long for the world when a dick was a policeman and a shammus was a private eye.
Delari
excllent everything, came quickly looked great
HelloBoB:D
Fredric Brown is one of the best Science Fiction writers, with O'Henry endings, humor, cynicism, with a hard driving plot. I guess his crime fiction has most of these characteristics, but it seems to have less bite. A nice read, but not special like his Sci-fi stuff.
Agrainel
Prompt and as described+++++
Fredric Brown was best known as a science fiction writer with a flair for the surprise ending. Actually, he wrote more mysteries than he did science fiction. His only series, the Ed & Am Hunter mysteries, ran to seven novels. This volume collects the first four.

"The Fabulous Clip Joint" (which won an Edgar): Ed Hunter's father, an alcoholic printer with a shrewish wife, is murdered on his way home from a late night binge. Aside from an alcoholic witch of a stepmother and an over-sexed younger stepsister (neither of whom he particularly likes) the only family Ed has left is Uncle Ambrose, an itinerant carnival worker that Ed hasn't seen in over a decade. Ed searches out his Uncle Am and together they set off on a quest to find and punish the killer. Under Uncle Am's guidance Ed learns (1) that his father wasn't the mediocrity Ed thought him to be, (2) that he, Ed, is capable of much more than he ever imagined, and (3) who killed his father.

"Dead Ringer": In a lateral logic puzzle, the author gives you a set of seemingly incongruous facts forming a "fair play" mystery. If you can fit the facts together correctly, you can solve the mystery. "Dead Ringer" is a lateral logic puzzle. All the pertinent facts are there. You just have to recognize which ones are relevant and the solution is obvious. At least it's obvious after Ed and Am Hunter explain how the facts fit together. A naked midget is found stabbed to death at the carnival. Later a chimpanzee drowns, and finally a child dies. Through the first two deaths, Ed and Am Hunter mind their own business. The third death stirs them to action, and the mystery is quickly solved. They arrive at the solution independently, but Am gets there a little quicker than Ed.

"The Bloody Moonlight": Ed Hunter, rookie detective with the Starlock Detective Agency, gets his first solo case. He goes to the country to check out an investment opportunity for a wealthy young lady who's appealing for more reasons than the size of her bank account. He has trouble sinking his teeth into the assignment because of a beautiful girl who isn't what she seems, a disappearing body, and a narrow minded sheriff who shoots first and asks questions later. On his way to interview the inventor, who may be in radio contact with Mars or Jupiter, Ed finds a body with the throat torn out. Ed leaves the body, finds a phone, and reports the crime. When the sheriff can't find the body, he beats Ed up, which makes Ed determined to [1] return the favor, and [2] find the body again. The plot thickens as Ed unravels who killed whom, the true identity of his dream girl, and exactly where those radio signals are coming from. He gets everything sorted out, and then confronts the problem of keeping the sheriff from killing him before he can expose whodunnit.

"Compliments of a Fiend": In one of his books on the paranormal, Charles Fort wrote of the disappearance in Mexico of the author Ambrose Bierce. He then mentioned the disappearance (several years later and almost a continent away) of another man named Ambrose, and asked whether there might not be an Ambrose Collector at work. It is against this backdrop that a gentleman calling himself Ambrose Collector telephones the Starlock Detective Agency asking for an operative who had experience with carnivals. Starlock dispatches Am(brose) Hunter, and he falls off the face of the earth. When Ed Hunter begins to miss his Uncle Am, a mutual friend opines that he must have been gotten by the Ambrose Collector. With only this clue to go on, Ed begins the search for his uncle. The investigation lurches along with no apparent progress, but all the while Ed is unwittingly gathering clues. When Ed solves the problem of the missing 45 minutes, the clues fall into place. Now Ed must not only find his uncle, but also survive the discovery.