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eBook Hebrew Perspectives on the Human Person in the Hellenistic Era: Philo and Paul (Mellen Biblical Press Series) download
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Author: Graham J. Warne
ISBN: 0773424202
Subcategory: Humanities
Pages 291 pages
Publisher Edwin Mellen Pr (June 1, 1995)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 882
ePUB size: 1543 kb
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eBook Hebrew Perspectives on the Human Person in the Hellenistic Era: Philo and Paul (Mellen Biblical Press Series) download

by Graham J. Warne


Hardcover, 291 pages. Published by Mellen Biblical Press .

Hardcover, 291 pages. Hebrew Perspectives on the Human Person in the Hellenistic Era: Philo and Paul (Mellen Biblical Press Series, Vol 35). ISBN. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Are you sure you want to remove Hebrew perspectives on the human . Published 1995 by Mellen Biblical Press in Lewiston, . Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with

Are you sure you want to remove Hebrew perspectives on the human person in the Hellenistic era from your list? Hebrew perspectives on the human person in the Hellenistic era. Philo and Paul. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat.

Hebrew Perspectives on the Human Person in the Hellenistic Era: Philo and Paul. The three basic areas in which the customers should be satisfied are accuracy, budgetary and human decency. Mellen Biblical Press Series 35. Lewiston: Mellen Biblical Press. Controlling Corporeality: The Body and the Household in Ancient Israel. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. The three basic areas in which the customers should be satisfied are accuracy, budgetary and human decency while.

4 Betz, The Concept of the ‘Inner Human Being’ (o9 e1sw a1nqrwpoj) in the Anthropology of Paul, NTS 46 (2000): 315–341.

So see David Kate Lawn 10/22/07 6:42 PM W. Stacey, The Pauline View of Man in Relation to Its Judaic and Hellenistic Backgrounds (London: Deleted: Schribner Macmillan, 1956) and more recently Graham J. Warne, Hebrew Perspectives on the Human Person in the Hellenistic Era: Philo and Paul (Mellen Biblical Press Series, 35; Lewiston, . 4 Betz, The Concept of the ‘Inner Human Being’ (o9 e1sw a1nqrwpoj) in the Anthropology of Paul, NTS 46 (2000): 315–341. 5 Betz, Concept of the ‘Inner Human Being’, 323–324.

General Note: Text in English with some Hebrew quotations. Includes bibliographical references and indexes. Rubrics: Philo of Alexandria Contributions in doctrine of man Paul the Apostle Saint Man (Theology) Biblical teaching Man (Jewish theology) History of doctrines Man (Christian theology) Early church, ca 30-600 Judaism Doctr Humans Body Theology. Download now Hebrew perspectives on the human person in the Hellenistic era : Philo and Paul Graham J. Warne:.

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Catholic Books "Grygiel offers a unique insight into the anthropology and personalism of Pope John Paul II especially in light of how the pope lived his philosophy in communion with God and other humans. Catholic Library World "Grygiel's essays. offer a hermeneutical guide for theological scholarship on the life and Christian humanism of Pope John Paul II. This book is appropriate for theological and seminary libraries.

The reference to frequent visits between Paul and the Philippians referred to in the correspondence makes its origin . Thus, active responsibility continuously exercised in the perspective of the approaching Parousia merges with Paul’s own readiness to sacrifice himself.

The reference to frequent visits between Paul and the Philippians referred to in the correspondence makes its origin in Rome unlikely and points rather toward Ephesus as the place of imprisonment. Paul’s reaction to the gift of the Philippians is almost rude (although he accepted gifts from no other congregation but preferred to support himself during his apostolic mission). In chapters 3–4 the situation may be totally different.

Philo of Alexandria represented a classic assimilation of the Greek dualist view (bi-partite body and soul), into the traditional Hebraic concept, and it was generally assumed that those who followed, particularly the writers of the New Testament, continued to uphold the assimilated view. Examining this view in the light of recent scholarship and the biblical texts, this volume concludes that, while the Apostle Paul must have been exposed to hellenistic concepts of the human as bi-partite, he resisted this interpretation, developing the fundamental Hebraic concept into a distinctively Christian anthropology. The interaction of the two views reached its climax in the Corinthian correspondence, where Paul clearly reversed the hellenized interpretation. The primary emphasis of this work lies in the integration of historical developments with in-depth textual study, bringing the biblical perspectives into closer harmony with contemporary psychological understandings. The work opens up the possibility of further examination of the New Testament (particularly the Gospels and the Book of Hebrews), by the same criteria.