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Author: Satu Kähkönen,Mancur Olson
ISBN: 0198294905
Subcategory: Business & Finance
Pages 288 pages
Publisher Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 2000)
Language English
Category: Other
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 775
ePUB size: 1448 kb
FB2 size: 1542 kb
DJVU size: 1704 kb
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eBook A Not-so-dismal Science: A Broader View of Economies and Societies download

by Satu Kähkönen,Mancur Olson


This book shows that, in calling economics the ''dismal science,'' Thomas Carlyle was profoundly wrong. Economic ideas have illuminated behaviour in all of the social sciences in addition to the economists' traditional domain.

This book shows that, in calling economics the ''dismal science,'' Thomas Carlyle was profoundly wrong. The broadening of economics and the use of economists' methods by social scientists in other fields is leading to a unified and positive view of economies and societies.

Satu Kahkonen is Associate Director of IRIS.

Mancur Olson was Distinguished Professor of economics at the University of Maryland and Founder and Principal Investigator of the Center for Institutional Reform and the Informal Sector (IRIS), also based at the University of Maryland. Satu Kahkonen is Associate Director of IRIS.

A Not-So-Dismal Science : A Broader View of Economies and Societies. Many of economics' greatest successes have been outside the traditional boundaries of the discipline. by Satu Kähkönen and Mancur Olson. Economic ideas have been the intellectual focus in the study of law, while in the study of politics, economists and political scientists using economics-type methods are uniquely influential. In sociology and history, economics has had a smaller but growing influence through "rational choice sociology" and "cliometrics.

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Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 6. 3% restored. Главная A Not-so-dismal Science: A Broader View of Economies and Societies. A Not-so-dismal Science: A Broader View of Economies and Societies. Mancur Olson, Satu Kähkönen.

This book shows that in calling economics the ‘dismal science’, Thomas Carlyle was profoundly wrong

This book shows that in calling economics the ‘dismal science’, Thomas Carlyle was profoundly wrong. The influence of economic thinking on other social sciences is bringing about a theoretical integration of all the social sciences under one overarching paradigm. The key theme that emerges is the interaction between political, economic, legal, and social forces.

Home Browse Books Book details, A Not-So-Dismal Science: A Broader View o. .By Mancur Olson, Satu Kähköhnen

Home Browse Books Book details, A Not-So-Dismal Science: A Broader View o. By Mancur Olson, Satu Kähköhnen. This book shows that, in calling economics the 'dismal science', Thomas Carlyle was profoundly wrong.

A Not-so-dismal Science. A Broader View of Economies and Societies. Modern economics is like a metropolitan area. Economists' ideas about business and markets are like the magnificent buildings of the city centre. Yet most growth and prosperity is in the suburbs - lately many of economics' greatest successes have been outside the traditional boundaries of the discipline. In the study of law, economic ideas have been the intellectual focus and & and economics' has become a major field.

Mancur Olson, Satu Kahkohnen. In the study of politics, economists and political scientists using economics-type methods are uniquely influential.

Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

Many of economics' greatest successes have been outside the traditional boundaries of the discipline. Economic ideas have been the intellectual focus in the study of law, while in the study of politics, economists and political scientists using economics-type methods are uniquely influential. In sociology and history, economics has had a smaller but growing influence through "rational choice sociology" and "cliometrics."This book shows that, in calling economics the "dismal science," Thomas Carlyle was profoundly wrong. Economic ideas have illuminated behavior in all of the social sciences in addition to the economists' traditional domain. The broadening of economics and the use of economists' methods by social scientists in other fields is leading to a unified and positive view of economies and societies.
Tojahn
Economics gets a bad rap from academics in other fields, reporters in the lamestream media, and liberals generally. Mancur Olson does an admirable job defending the discipline and showing how economics illuminates all manner of social and economic problems. The "introduction" of this book is actually a brilliant essay worth the price of the book itself. (Most of the rest of the book is articles by other writers.) Chapter 1 is a reprint of Olson's famous 1996 article, "Big Bills Left on the Sidewalk: Why Some Nations are Rich, and Others Poor." Read this book before you reach any judgment about the applicability of economics to any social problem, and be prepared to be surprised.
Cozius
Reviewer: Bill Roach ([email protected])
`Traditional' economics, which focuses on overpopulation and shortages of capital and other resources, tends to offer a dismal outlook for underdeveloped countries. The title of the book stems from the premise that, if the scope of investigation is expanded to include institutions and economic policy, the outlook is less dismal. That is, changes in institutions and policies can have a very favorable impact on prospects for development in poor countries.
The book is a collection of papers by scholars in Economics, Law, Business, History and Social Sciences, on the effects of policies and institutions on development. From the preface, by Olson and Kakhonen:
"The chapters in this book illustrate the intellectual advances that are broadening economics and integrating the social sciences. They illustrate these advances in almost all of the fields in which they are occurring. This book was inspired in part by the belief that just such a book on the broader economics or integrated social sciences was needed - and that it would take a number of experts in different fields to illustrate the wide range of work being done. ... It is the shortcomings of the economic policies and institutions of the capital-short countries of the world that keep investors ... from putting much capital there. ... These shortcomings also blight the productivity of the indigenous resources of the poor countries. ... governance is a decisive determinant of economic performance, and ... with the right economic policies and institutions, countries as poor as India could grow at very rapid rates and become developed nations far sooner than is usually supposed."
From Chapter 10, by Pranab Bardhan:
"The New Institutional Economics points to some very important features of institutional failures that cause or prolong underdevelopment, particularly the legal and contractual structures and rules of third-party enforcement which are necessary for most arms-length market transactions. ... In Western societies, over time, complex institutional structures have been devised ... [which include] property rights, formal contracts and guarantees, trademarks, limited liability, bankruptcy laws, and large corporate organization with governance structures to limit problems of agency and ... of incomplete contracting and ex-post opportunism."
Contributors include Pranab Bardhan, Robert D. Cooter, J. Bradford De Long, Russell Hardin, Satu Kahkonen, Eric Moberg, Joel Mokyr, Edward Montgomery, Mancur Olson, and Oliver E. Williamson.