» » Free Ride: How the Internet is Destroying the Culture Business and How it Can Fight Back
eBook Free Ride: How the Internet is Destroying the Culture Business and How it Can Fight Back download
No category
Author: Levine
ISBN: 009954928X
Publisher Rupa & Co (2012)
Language English
Category: No category
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 255
ePUB size: 1204 kb
FB2 size: 1330 kb
DJVU size: 1128 kb
Other formats: doc rtf azw txt

eBook Free Ride: How the Internet is Destroying the Culture Business and How it Can Fight Back download

by Levine


Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Free Ride: How the Internet is Destroying the Culture Business and How it Can Fight Back as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

He now covers the culture business from New York and Berlin. Free Ride is his first book.

in politics from Brandeis and an . from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism. He now covers the culture business from New York and Berlin. Country of Publication.

How did the media industry lose control over its destiny? .

How did the media industry lose control over its destiny? What are the consequences? And are we headed for cultural meltdown if the media can't stop the free ride? . in politics from Brandeis and an .

Free Ride does nothing to anticipate that and is thus lacking in imagination It’s kind of funny how he accurately and honestly tells media’s shortcomings and how it influenced their future, while still kind of stubbornly trying to defend their business models.

Free Ride does nothing to anticipate that and is thus lacking in imagination. It is better read as a history book, an excellent study for students of its subject matter. Beyond that it doesn't help much being more about where we are and how we got here than where we're going. It would be churlish to mark this book down not agreeing with its thrust. Due to Levine's knowledge and his articulacy I give it five. It’s kind of funny how he accurately and honestly tells media’s shortcomings and how it influenced their future, while still kind of stubbornly trying to defend their business models.

Free Ride is the essential guide to a global marketplace in transition: where we are, how we got here and what we have to. .

Free Ride is the essential guide to a global marketplace in transition: where we are, how we got here and what we have to do to avoid cultural meltdown.

In his new book, Free Ride: How Digital Parasites .

In "Free Ride," Levine outlines how boardroom and courtroom battles have shaped the dysfunctional online media business. He also takes a look at how the same problems decimating the recording industry are also hurting newspapers, TV networks, book publishers and movie studios.

Its bluntness, however, is of a piece with his book, which pulls few punches. Behind this lies a simple commercial truth: the flat, open structure of the internet has helped a small number of companies make vast sums of money by controlling navigation and distribution, while hollowing out the capacity of those creating original media content to make any profit at all. "Traditional media companies aren't in trouble because they're not giving consumers what they want," Levine writes.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Free Ride: How the Internet Is Destroying. Publisher: Bodley Head. Publication Date: 2011.

THIS IS BRAND NEW BOOK.WE PROVIDE 100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION.
White gold
This would’ve been a great book was it not for its defense of current media’s business models. If the author would have focused on the financial incentives of tech companies in getting into media distribution and the challenges this brings to creators, it would’ve been an excellent book. His effort to defend media and their current business models is just fascinating. It’s kind of funny how he accurately and honestly tells media’s shortcomings and how it influenced their future, while still kind of stubbornly trying to defend their business models. His defense of creators (and his worries about how tech intermediaries and piracy are affecting them) is very good and to the point; his shortcoming comes from defending old business models and not being straightforward enough about the abuse to culture of longer, stricter copyright.

Overall the book is worth reading. It is honest, passionate, well researched and provides an interesting analysis. I found it really enlightening in pointing out the economic incentives of tech companies behind their support of the romantic view of a free internet and how their business drive affects not only media intermediaries but, most importantly, creators.
sergant
So happy the author Robert Levine has peeled back the onion on this subject . . . America (and the world) is experiencing a crushing cultural change - digital parasites are everywhere! Read this volume to find out why . . . recommend.
Shaktiktilar
The book starts with a great overview of where the current situation comes from, from the earliest Betamax case to the current efforts to make legal content more convenient than piracy. At some points it becomes dense with too many names and examples but overall a great book.
Freighton
Very informative and interesting.
Tholmeena
This is a step by step explanation of how thieves (corporations, individuals,etc.) are killing professional music, writing and movie making. If you want to know how and why it's happening, read this book. It's the whole, real story.
Macill
If Levine isn't your go to guy for digital commerce, your information is second rate.
Gavirgas
If you are searching for information about the so-called copyright wars in books, you will find virtually zero books that tell the story from the point of view of actual content creators. Instead you'll find books by the likes of Larry Lessig, Jessica Litman, Siva Vaidhyanathan, Terry Fisher, and Tarleton Gillespie that call for "free culture" and weaker copyright. Every one of these authors are academics who benefit from what even Lessig has called the academic patronage system. In other words, none of these people have ever experienced what it means to try to make a living creating content.

Robert Levine is, above all else, a journalist. He has a nose for hard facts and quotations that can stand by themselves. And he knows how to tell a story. The story he tells is one of an entrenched industry (media) and a newly powerful one (Internet companies) fighting the copyright wars, but with a difference: the latter has taken on the mantle of "freedom" and "individual liberties," while the former only knows how to cry "theft."

Levine shows how naive it is to treat companies like Google and Facebook as champions of the consumer while treating media companies as evil bloodsuckers. They are both businesses, and both types of companies act the way businesses are supposed to act. The Internet industry stands to benefit from free content for everybody; the media industry doesn't. The rest falls into place. That's the story that Levine tells.

Is Levine (as some reviewers here claim) an apologist for the media industry? Hardly. He has plenty of negative things to say about Big Media.

The book does have a few shortcomings. Levine uses Big Media as a proxy for all content creators, which puts him in the company of just about every other author on this subject, but it's just as incomplete a picture. He also looks to certain schemes in Europe as potential solutions to the problem, such as charging taxes (known more politely as "levies") on consumer electronics and blank media and distributing the proceeds to copyright owners, without understanding the many problems with such schemes.

Otherwise, this book is a hurricane's worth of fresh air. Everyone who is interested in copyright and culture should read it... if they are prepared to open their minds to actual facts instead of theories and tirades, and to reconsider the sense of entitlement to free content that has become the norm nowadays.
How did the music business get cut in half in ten years? Why are all other media businesses shrinking? Levine systematically lays out the facts on how internet companies are abusing both the law and their goodwill with the public to undermine our culture and creative industries.