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eBook Lowside of the Road: a Life of Tom Waits download
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Author: Hoskyns. Barney.
ISBN: 057124503X
Publisher Broadway Books; Export ed. edition (2009)
Language English
Category: No category
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 423
ePUB size: 1988 kb
FB2 size: 1473 kb
DJVU size: 1912 kb
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eBook Lowside of the Road: a Life of Tom Waits download

by Hoskyns. Barney.


Hoskyns persevered in writing the first Waits biography, netting fascination firsthand stories, terrific . While the title is obviously chosen for being an actual Waits song, Hoskyns should've called this book "TWO sides of the Road.

Hoskyns persevered in writing the first Waits biography, netting fascination firsthand stories, terrific photographs, and fanatically detailed information about studio sessions and concerts. the result is a respectful, entertaining, and revelatory portrait set within a vivid cultural context. It's about time received biographical homage from a rock writer of the stature of Hoskyns. -Stephen Poole, The Guardian. with the delineation being the start of Waits' relationship with Brennan.

Tom Waits is an intriguing subject for a biography. Also a reluctant one, as Barney Hoskyns discovered to his cost when writing this book. Never mind getting an interview with Waits himself. Even the author's requests to speak to friends and colleagues of Waits were blanked by almost everyone who still had any contact with this remarkable but shadowy performer.

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Lowside of the Road book. Spanning his extraordinary forty-year career from Closing Time to Orphans, from his perilous jazzbo years in 1970s LA to such shape-shifting albums as Swordfishtrombones and Rain Dogs to the Grammy Award winners of recent years, this definitive biography charts Waits’s life and art step by step, album by album.

Spanning Tom Waits' extraordinary 40-year career, from Closing Time to Orphans, Lowside of the Road is Barney Hoskyns' unique take on one of rock's great enigmas. Like Bob Dylan and Neil Young, Waits is a chameleonic survivor who's achieved long-term success while retaining cult credibility and outsider mystique.

With his trademark growl, carnival-madman persona, haunting music, and unforgettable lyrics, Tom Waits is one of the . Hoskyns delivers the first serious biography to make sense of the life and career of this beloved icon.

With his trademark growl, carnival-madman persona, haunting music, and unforgettable lyrics, Tom Waits is one of the most revered and critically acclaimed.

Tom Waits presents a double bind for a biographer. His life has been the subject of such mythologising that you feel a bit of truth wouldn't go amiss; but then the myths are so entertaining, why would you want to spoil them? That Barney Hoskyns has overcome this to produce these meticulous 600 pages is testament to his NME-inspired sense of rock-writing as a calling. His piecing together of Waits's formative years is serious investigative work. The songwriter's father, Frank, was an alcoholic Spanish teacher who ran away from his family

Spanning Tom Waits’ extraordinary 40-year career, from Closing Time to Orphans, Lowside of the Road is Barney Hoskyns’ unique . In 1991 I wrote a proposal for a book called ‘Sucker On The Vine: Tom Waits in Tinseltown’

Spanning Tom Waits’ extraordinary 40-year career, from Closing Time to Orphans, Lowside of the Road is Barney Hoskyns’ unique take on one of rock’s great enigmas. In 1991 I wrote a proposal for a book called ‘Sucker On The Vine: Tom Waits in Tinseltown’. I never showed it to anybody because pretty soon after I got stuck into my big LA book Waiting for the Sun (which mentioned Waits in two or three places). And then, what made you eventually take the plunge?

Stoneshaper
A deadly, dull exposition of the life of a great songwriter. Endlessly repetitive and with next to no original sourcing. If you know zero about Tom Waits you might learn something here - the operative phrase here is you know zero about Tom Waits.
Zulkishicage
If you are a "big time" Waits fan, then this book is worth reading. It doesn't poke any substantial holes in Waitsian mythology and folklore by protesting too much, although I admit that I felt a bit sheepish reading it with the knowledge that Waits would not approve. There are some that might say biographies are always fundamentally flawed from subjectivity, point of view, and the effect of time on recollection. If so, the only true biography for Tom Waits is an auto-biography, which will never happen. And if it did, it'd be deliberately more apocryphal then this effort, but certainly more fun. It'd be a raconteur's treasure trove of wonderful metaphors and tall tales. Tom's truth is not factual.

As it is, to classify this book as an (unauthorized) biography is a stretch---it's less a biography than a very long (borderline tabloid) essay with the author too-often upstaging his subject matter. We are forced to read what Barney Hoskyns personally thinks about Waits and his music with specific judgments of which songs work and those that don't, which is very questionable given this book is supposedly about Tom's life---it's even in the title. As another reviewer mentioned, I don't want to know what Hoskyns thinks about the album Real Gone or the song Lucinda, and I don't care. This information doesn't belong here. These are regrettable flaws to what is, overall, a decent and difficult effort given the subject matter. It's certainly better than all of the other bio-Waits attempts save Jay S. Jacobs's book Wild Years: The Music and Myth of Tom Waits, who is a more disciplined writer overall and leaves far fewer traces of himself. Jacobs has more respect for the subject and the subject matter, and takes more of a tack toward the music than on Waits's personal details.

Biographies have their place, but it's better to focus on Wait's music. And with this approach, I'd say David Smay's review of Swordfishtrombones in the 33 1/3 book series is probably the best Waitsian book out there so far next to Jacobs', and at only 7" x 6" and 126 pages. This is because Smay doesn't try to infiltrate the artist or his confidants, or lackadasically accept every anecdote he stumbles upon, which are presumptuous at best and filler at worst. Smay addresses the art itself, which is all you really need when it comes to Waits. He respectfully separates the artist from the man. And Smay doesn't present his book as anything other than his own editorial POV, unlike Hoskyns, who veers into literary paparazzi territory from time to time.

Still, I'd wager that the curious id in each Raindog wants to know more about Tom and even more about the mysterious Kathleen, as if deconstructing the duo might reveal some secrets or a little more of Tom's unique soul to us. Much of Lowside does indeed offer much more than other Waits biographies, and for this reason the curious cat in me did find it satisfying overall, if only superficially so. How accurate is it? We'll never know, and in a way I'm glad for that.

Consumer bottom line: Buy a used version of Lowside after reading David Smay's and Jay S. Jacob's books first.
Malogamand
At 513 pages I came away with the feeling that Mr. Hoskyns might benefit from the tacit understanding that some artists just don't need explaining. In frustration what we get is subjective record /song reviews and snippets of conversations T.W. had with people he actually wanted to talk to.
INvait
While the title is obviously chosen for being an actual Waits song, Hoskyns should've called this book "TWO sides of the Road." There is an obvious "Part One" and "Part Two" here...with the delineation being the start of Waits' relationship with Brennan. After that, Hoskyns runs out of sources who WOULD talk to him about Waits and morphs from biographer to armchair music critic...while constantly whining about Waits' desire to keep his private life private.

The first part of the book is actually pretty decent, and provides a glimpse of Waits' childhood and musical beginnings. The stories and interviews with those involved with his first few albums are also enjoyable. The most interesting part of the entire book is the seemingly complete alienation by Waits of anyone involved with his career after Brennan steps into the picture. This is where the Yoko comparisons start coming into play and, to his credit, Hoskyns does a good job of allowing those involved to express their disappointment and sadness of the sudden overnight change. However, Waits has said on more than one occasion that Brennan saved his life (most recently during his Rock N Roll Hall of Fame induction speech). He stopped drinking soon after their relationship began, and she gave him the courage to begin the "experimental" period of his career. So, if alienating those who were part of his "troubadour years" is what it took to achieve all that he has since, it's hard to argue with that decision.

I think it's obvious at this point that we'll never have a "true" biography of Waits. Even if he wrote his own, I'm not sure how much would actually be truth instead of fiction given his penchant for storytelling and sense of humor. Perhaps it's best that we as fans just accept him as the mystery he's always been and continue to enjoy the music.
Arthunter
Here's the deal- I'm a huge Tom Waits fan these days. I used to listen to him here and there, but never to the extent of how often I'm listening to him now. I adore his music and wanted to learn more about the mysterious man behind the music, despite knowing Waits was a private man who certainly had no interest in having a book written about him. That said, I figured this book was the closest I was going to get to learning as much as possible. And unless Barney Hoskyns really decided to make up his facts, I learned a hell of a lot of stuff and it only made me appreciate Tom Waits more.

I really liked how Hoskyns made this part-biography and part-discography run through. He detailed each song on every album (minus "Bad As Me"), and I thought that was just icing on the cake- even if he did jump on the soapbox once in a while to give his own personal reviews of particular albums or songs. For example, I didn't need to read about why he thought the "Real Gone" album wasn't his favorite.

I do recommend this book for any Waits fan, for its the closest one can get to understanding the life of this musical genius until he possibly decides, one day, to grant permission to someone to write about his life- officially.
Burirus
Since its "unauthorized" I'm not sure how accurate it might be. But I love Tom Waits music and was thirsty for more insight.
Mr_Mole
Good job, book came as described, right on time.
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