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eBook Continent download
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Author: Jim Crace Jim Crace
ISBN: 0330453319
Pages 176 pages
Publisher Picador (January 4, 2008)
Language English
Category: No category
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 463
ePUB size: 1730 kb
FB2 size: 1774 kb
DJVU size: 1598 kb
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eBook Continent download

by Jim Crace Jim Crace


James Crace (born 1 March 1946) is an English writer and novelist.

James Crace (born 1 March 1946) is an English writer and novelist. His novels include Quarantine, which was judged Whitbread Novel of 1998, and Harvest, which won the 2015 International Dublin Literary Award, the 2013 James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and was shortlisted for the 2013 Booker Prize. Crace was born at Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire, while it was a maternity hospital. He grew up on an estate in Enfield, north London and attended Enfield Grammar School

JIM CRACE is the author of Continent, The Gift of Stones, Arcadia, Signals of Distress, Quarantine (winner of the 1998 Whitbread Novel of the Year and shortlisted for the Booker Prize), Being Dead (winner of the 2001 National Book Critics’ Circle Award), The Devil’s Larder, Six, and Th. .

JIM CRACE is the author of Continent, The Gift of Stones, Arcadia, Signals of Distress, Quarantine (winner of the 1998 Whitbread Novel of the Year and shortlisted for the Booker Prize), Being Dead (winner of the 2001 National Book Critics’ Circle Award), The Devil’s Larder, Six, and The Pesthouse. In 1999 Jim Crace was elected to the Royal Society of Literature.

Winner of the Whitbread Novel of the Year and a Booker Prize finalist. A literary feast of sheer imagination and indulgence, from the Booker-shortlisted author of Quarantine. Two thousand years ago four travellers enter the Judean desert to fast and pray for their lost souls.

James Joseph Croce (/ˈkroʊtʃi/; January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973) was an American folk and rock singer-songwriter. Between 1966 and 1973, Croce released five studio albums and numerous singles. His first two albums were commercially unsuccessful, failing to chart or produce any hit singles. During this period, Croce took a series of odd jobs to pay bills while he continued to write, record, and perform concerts

Continent, Crace Jim. Варианты приобретения. Описание: Jim Crace's biggest novel since "Being Dead" draws once more on his genius with landscape and myth, to create a lost and bewitching English world

Continent, Crace Jim. Описание: Jim Crace's biggest novel since "Being Dead" draws once more on his genius with landscape and myth, to create a lost and bewitching English world. As late summer steals in and the final pearls of barley are gleaned, a village comes under threat.

A novel in seven stories, Continent is an exploration of the cultures, communities and natural life of an entirely .

A novel in seven stories, Continent is an exploration of the cultures, communities and natural life of an entirely imaginary realm. Built on rich seams of myth and metaphor, this new, seventh continent is strange, atmospheric and yet not wholly a mirage, for its inhabitants are disarmingly familiar, known to us through their loves, their hopes and their struggles to make sense of life. On its first publication over twenty years ago, this spellbinding book marked the arrival of one of the most inventive minds at work in modern fiction.

The Guardian Books podcast Jim Crace on The Melody – books podcast. On this week’s show, Jim Crace talks about his latest novel and we discuss the different ways we read books, after Claire has a strange epiphany. Published: 20 Mar 2018. Jim Crace on The Melody – books podcast. Published: 13 Feb 2018. Published: 7 Feb 2018.

Jim Crace at the 2009 Texas Book Festival. Immediately after graduating from university, Crace joined the Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO) and was sent to Khartoum, Sudan, where he assisted writing and producing educational programs for Sudanese Educational Television. 1946-03-01) 1 March 1946 St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. Crace traveled through Africa and briefly taught at a village school called Kgosi Kgari Sechele Secondary School in Molepolole, Botswana. Crace’s exposure to other cultures while living abroad in Africa and later while traveling through North and Central America also inspired his later writings.

Short stories describes a marathon runner's race with a horseman, an unusual forest tribe, an imprisoned clerk, and a sign maker who is pressured to make more signs for American collectors
THOMAS
Along with several other prizes, Continent won Jim Crace the Whitbread First Novel of the Year Award, which must have been something of a surprise to him considering that this is not a novel but a collection of short stories. Despite being his debut work - novel or not - this book represents a mature and intelligent beginning to Crace's career.

There are two things about Continent that stood out for me as a reader. The first is the quality of the writing. Crace avoids the great error practiced by many authors today, which is to be ornamental and flowery under the guise of being "poetic." This excruciating emphasis of style over substance is too often the misguided product of creative writing programs. Students in these programs should instead study Crace's style to get an idea of what good writing is like: poetic in places, certainly, but also possessing a level of restraint and understatement that lends muscle and nuance to his prose. There is no unsightly narrative flab on display here.

The other thing that stands out is Crace's intelligence. Continent does not possess any recurring characters or plot lines, but the stories - with the exception of the second story "The World with One Eye Shut," easily the weakest piece in here - are linked by the common theme of the ambiguity of change and progress. The opening piece "Talking Skull," for instance, is told from the perspective of Lowbro, an educated young man whose father has made a fortune from selling the milk of hermaphrodite cows to a superstitious populace. Torn between his family history and the enlightened perspective his education has brought him, Lowbro is faced with difficult decisions about how to manage his future.

Crace's repeated message that the arrival of modernity has, beneath its glittering surface, numerous drawbacks that cannot be undone is a message that stretches all the way back to Jean-Jacques Rousseau. But Crace is never simplistic or hackneyed in his treatment of these problems: the conflict between modern and ancient in each story is like a coin that is turned over and over, allowing the reader to see the qualities and flaws of each side. The objects of the old superstitions that appear in these stories - magical milk, sexual rituals, electricity, horse-riding traditions, calligraphy - are thus always presented ambiguously. The benefits of science and progress, Crace shows, can come at a high price, a trade-off that is reflected, in turn, by the mixture of profound wisdom and superstitious ignorance that characterizes pre-modern cultures.

It is hard not compare Crace's stories in Continent to both Franz Kafka and Jorge Luis Borges, although these two influences are fused together in an original way that belies mere imitation. There is, for instance, Crace's decision, reflected in the title of his book, to set his stories in a kind of utopia in which particular settings are sometimes suggested ("Sins and Virtues," for instance, is clearly set somewhere in the Middle East) but never clearly defined, a strategy that both Kafka and Borges use to great effect. But the most important aspect of their influence lies in Crace's fusion of fiction and philosophy - not using literature as a didactic vehicle, but as a mode of critical inquiry, searching and questioning as the narrative snakes forward, always willing to double back and, if necessary, bite its own tail.

Continent is a solid book, but not a perfect one, and it is in the area of unity and purpose that I have my biggest reservations about it. The second story is glaringly out of place in the collection, as I have already noted, and I am bemused at what Crace was trying to do by suggesting that this fictional continent is somehow a variation on our own world - it's not, and this strategy of suggesting a parallel world seems to me a distraction from the book's real themes. That said, there was plenty to like in this collection, and it makes me looking forward to seeing whether Crace has fulfilled the promise evident in his debut work.
Kigul
Fun, fun, fun!!! I was hooked early and stayed hooked until it finished - way too soon.

The book description above tells you as much about the book as it is possible to tell without totally spoiling the read. There are several interrelated stories that will amuse, puzzle and dazzle you.

The used prices are cheap enough for you risk a few bucks to discover an enjoyable story. I have ordered all of his books. If the rest are even close to being as good as this, I have many great reads ahead.
Xava
I picked this up because the author was nominated for the Man Booker award.
I gave up after the first 3 stories.

I thought the stories, characters and writing were all vary poorly done.
There was potential there but the stories seemed listless and never developed into anything I cared about.
The writing style somewhat evoked the environment, but overall was shallow and uninspiring.

These stories may have some "deep bases", but they simply did not work for me.
Jia
In Jim Crace's first novel (actually in disguise a seven stories), CONTINENT, the talented author of QUARANTINE and THE GIFT OF STONES has brought to life the very landscape of the story itself, making it the 'character' that all of the stories have in common, the thread that ties them all together.
It is quite an invention -- unique, alien and unrecognizable, a seventh continent, unnamed, for which Crace has conceived languages, people and cultures that will not allow themselves to be pigeonholed by the reader's preconceptions. This device is a risky one -- and Crace pulls it off beautifully. He has brought into being a clean, empty slate upon which to paint these tales -- and in doing so he has freed himself of societal conventions.
By separating the reader from the known world, Crace holds up a painting for us to lose ourselves within -- and before we know it, it becomes a mirror, and we are looking at ourselves, but in a fabulist landscape wherein our beliefs and actions are actually more sharply in focus than if they were in their usual surroundings. Very effective.
I have only (so far) read the two other works by Crace that I mentioned above -- and I enjoyed them thoroughly as well. This book is quite different -- reminding me, as one of the quotes on the book jacket mentioned, of Italo Calvino. Not bad company for Mr. Crace to share, in my opinion -- and I'm not saying his work is derivative of Calvino's art in any way. I'm also reminded of the recent novel by Gaetan Soucy, THE LITTLE GIRL WHO WAS TOO FOND OF MATCHES, another amazing creation of a seemingly parallel -- but just as unnamable -- space and time.
There is much to be gained and absorbed from this work -- it will definitely merit repeated readings. I'm also looking forward to reading BEING DEAD and THE DEVIL'S LARDER.