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eBook The Meaning of Language download
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Author: Robert M. Martin
ISBN: 0262132249
Publisher MIT Press (MA); 1 Edition edition (January 1, 1987)
Language English
Category: No category
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 368
ePUB size: 1796 kb
FB2 size: 1129 kb
DJVU size: 1564 kb
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eBook The Meaning of Language download

by Robert M. Martin


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He gives a lot of good examples, which make often difficult theories a lot more clear.

The book's style is pedagogic, not polemical.

by. Martin, Robert M. Publication date. Includes bibliographies and index.

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A pretty good intro book in a subject without many of them. com User, May 1, 2007

A pretty good intro book in a subject without many of them. com User, May 1, 2007. While it's a little lacking in the overall structure department, the different chapters for the most part provide useful overviews of their respective topics (. definite descriptions, radical translation, et.

Robert Cecil Martin, colloquially known as "Uncle Bob", is an American software engineer and instructor. He is best known for being one of the authors of the Agile Manifesto and for developing several software design principles. Martin operated the now-defunct company, Object Mentor, which provided instructor-led training courses about extreme programming methodology

Scientific Thinking – Ebook written by Robert M. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Scientific Thinking.

Scientific Thinking – Ebook written by Robert M. Scientific Thinking is a practical guide to inductive reasoning-the sort of reasoning that is commonly used in scientific activity, whether such activity is performed by a scientist, a reporter, a political pollster, or any one of us in day-to-day life. The book provides comprehensive coverage of such topics as confirmation, sampling, correlations, causality, hypotheses, and experimental methods.

Book by Robert M. Martin
Thundershaper
This is a fairly good catch-all intro to many basic topics in the philosophy of language. While it's a little lacking in the overall structure department, the different chapters for the most part provide useful overviews of their respective topics (e.g. definite descriptions, radical translation, etc.). I'd say it might be good if you knew a little about philosophy of language before picking this up, but the only intro more accessible than this I can recommend is "Philosophy of Language" by Lycan. Given the lack of good entry-level surveys in this subject, I'd recommend this if you're starting out in the field and want to learn more about the subject.
Sardleem
When I started out to write a paper on semantics, my professor advised me to use this book as a guideline for defining the exact subject on my paper and for becoming more familiar with the vast field of philosophy of language. Since I had already followed a course on philosophy of language, Robert M. Martin's book did not tell me much that I did not know yet. But for students just starting out in the field, the book gives a wealth of very clear information. Martin covers all aspects of the philosophy of language and the logic of language in short and accesible chapters. He gives a lot of good examples, which make often difficult theories a lot more clear. For me, as a more advanced student, the references at the end of each chapter were very helpful: Martin refers to a number of books on each specific subject, and I must say they are really good. Using the references on Speech Acts I found some essential articles that went on to form the base of my paper. In his Amazon.com-interview, Martin states he hates the boring way most academic philosophy is written in. I do not totally agree on that, but I do admit that Martin does NOT write boring or vague, and that makes his book all the better.