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eBook Rocket Ship Galileo download
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Author: Robert A. Heinlein
ISBN: 0345260686
Publisher Del Rey (July 12, 1977)
Language English
Category: No category
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 849
ePUB size: 1668 kb
FB2 size: 1340 kb
DJVU size: 1129 kb
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eBook Rocket Ship Galileo download

by Robert A. Heinlein


---- Printed in the United States of America.

---- Printed in the United States of America. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without the permission of Charles Scribner’s Sons. A great plume of black smoke surged out the orifice of the thundering rocket when it was first fired, billowed against an earth ramp set twenty feet behind the rocket test stand and filled the little clearing with choking fumes. Ross shook his head in dissatisfaction at this and made an adjustment in the controls under his hand.

Читать онлайн Rocket Ship Galileo. Chapter 1 - "LET THE ROCKET ROAR". We've read what we could-Pollard and Davidson, and Gamov's new book. But we don't have the math for atomics

Читать онлайн Rocket Ship Galileo. But we don't have the math for atomics. How much math do you have?"

Robert Heinlein wrote "Rocket Ship Galileo" in 1947 but it remains a good fast read to this da. Robert A Heinlein wrote excellent books in the 1940 to the 1960s. In the later years his books tend to get long winded and not as adventure packed

Robert Heinlein wrote "Rocket Ship Galileo" in 1947 but it remains a good fast read to this day. I liked the period slang the characters throw around to each other. In the later years his books tend to get long winded and not as adventure packed. The Heinlein Juveniles are where he shows his true high quality writing.

Rocket Ship Galileo is a juvenile science fiction novel by American writer Robert A. Heinlein, published in 1947, about three teenagers who participate in a pioneering flight to the Moon. It was the first in the Heinlein juveniles, a long and successful series of science fiction novels published by Scribner's. The novel was originally envisioned as the first of a series of books called "Young Rocket Engineers". It was initially rejected by publishers, because going to the moon was "too far out".

Oh, my, yes! We've read what we could-Pollard and Davidson, and Gamov's new book. How much math do you have?" "Through differential equations.

At lunch the adults talked, the boys listened. The scientist, his turban bandage looking stranger than ever, hit it off well with his elders. Oh, my, yes! We've read what we could-Pollard and Davidson, and Gamov's new book. Huh?" Cargraves looked amazed.

But they never imagined they would team up with a nuclear physicist to construct and crew a rocket bound for the moon. And they never expected to gain some powerful enemies in the process. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

SKYWARD!,. 8, THAT SOUNDS MORE LIKE you, Doc!. Are the others up yet?. Not yet. They didn’t get much sleep. Let’s let them sleep. We’ll sit out in the car. Take. When they had settled themselves Ross asked, Doc, how much longer will it take to get ready?. Well, I think the key to our problems lies in how fast we can get away. If these attempts to stop us keep up, one of them is going to work. I wish we would leave today. We can’t do that, Cargraves answered, but it shouldn’t be long

Author: Robert Heinlein.

Author: Robert Heinlein. Chapter 1 - "LET THE ROCKET ROAR"1. Chapter 3 - CUT-RATE COLUMBUS3. Chapter 4 - THE BLOOD OF PIONEERS4.

Rocket Ship Galileo A Del Rey book Ballantine Books (Том 30276).

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Robert Anson Heinlein was born on July 7, 1907 in Butler, Mo. The son of Rex Ivar and Bam Lyle Heinlein, Robert Heinlein had two older brothers, one younger brother, and three younger sisters. Moving to Kansas City, M. at a young age, Heinlein graduated from Central High School in 1924 and attended one year of college at Kansas City Community College. Rocket Ship Galileo A Del Rey book Ballantine Books (Том 30276).

1977, mass market paperback reprint edition (of a work first published in 1947), Del Rey, NY. 187 pages. Four amateur astronauts manage to put a rocket ship in orbit. They're on their way to the moon. Wait till they find out who's waiting for them.
Chillhunter
Robert Heinlein wrote "Rocket Ship Galileo" in 1947 but it remains a good fast read to this day. I liked the period slang the characters throw around to each other. Also in tune with the period are the antagonists, Nazi survivors who establish an atom bomb base on the moon! Wow!
Three young fellas just out of high school spend their summer vacation re-building a transport rocket into a moon ship along with a brilliant scientist. Heinlein uses the teacher-pupil relationship to present nuggets of scientific knowledge to the reader.
"Rocket Ship Galileo" stands at the head of a line of twelve books referred to as "Heinlein Juveniles" in the Heinlein archives. He wrote twelve what we would call "Young Adult" books today, each an independent work not associated with any other. In all of them he has young people standing up and growing up as strong independent young humans. The series ends with "Have Spacesuit-Will Travel" in 1958. Some folks will include "Star Ship Troopers" and "Podkayne of Mars" but they were by different publishers.
As a first try the book has some flaws. The story line is laughable and the characters seem tissue thin to those familiar with Heinlein's later work. But the underlying theme of self reliance, initiative and the daring needed to accomplish great things are all there to be absorbed along the the story itself. The government is mentioned only as an impediment to the progress of the boys, a reflection of Heinlein's Libertarian streak. For that reason and the skill with which these themes are inserted into the story we give the high number of stars.
Anyone of the proper age will benefit from this story. Dads' and Grand Dad's might gift their young decedents with this book.
Arabella V.
This was Heinlein's first novel published in book form, and the first in his excellent "juvenile" series which included Space Cadet, Time For The Stars, Starman Jones, The Star Beast, Tunnel In The Sky, etc., and it is still my all-time favorite. Heinlein manages to make believable the tale of a scientist (Dr. Cargraves) organizing three 18-year-old boys of a rocket club to build a nuclear powered moon rocket. If you have an interest in space travel you'll get sucked in and won't put the book down until it's over, no matter how dated and unlikely the premise at first appears. It is written with Heinlein's usual skill (that earned him four Hugo awards), and the characters are easy to identify with, especially for any young space enthusiasts. This was also the basis for the 1950 classic film Destination Moon, although about all that remains unchanged in the film is the name Dr. Cargraves. In the book there is a veiled threat from unknown enemies that turn out to be Nazis (this was the first thing Heinlein wrote after the war) - in the film there's just a veiled reference to a communist threat. I suspect the film also draws from Heinlein's more sophisticated treatment from the same period, The Man Who Sold The Moon.
On 6 October 1988, after Robert Heinlein's death, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) awarded him the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal:
"In recognition of his meritorious service to the Nation and mankind in advocating and promoting the exploration of space. Through dozens of superbly written novels and essays and his epoch-making movie Destination Moon, he helped inspire the Nation to take its first step into space and onto the Moon." -- James C. Fletcher, Administrator, NASA
No true Heinlein fan should be without an original Scribner's hardcover edition of Rocket Ship Galileo, with the same cover and illustrations as the first edition.
Shalinrad
Galileo is, I believe, the first of Heinlein's celebrated juvenile books. I know I first read it shortly after learning to read. I could not have been older than seven. Holy cow. While the idea of Nazis on the moon is ludicrous these days, the story itself continues to compellingly engage the mind. The dialogue and situations, if you are old enough to remember anything of those days, still has the ring of truth. Heinlein was just beginning to hit his stride as a full-time, for-real author when he wrote this. It is sublime to read him as he stretches his wings and finds he is very comfortable. This book is comfort food for the mind, sort of like a meatloaf dinner.
Biaemi
Rocketship Galileo is a fun sci fi adventure. Remember it was written in 1947, yes, 1947 so considering the date, some 20+ years before the moon landing there are many "predictions" which Heinlein made which showed vision. The story follows three young adults (18 years old) and one scientist. They take a already made ballistic rocket and transform it into atomic powered.

They journey to the moon for an adventure.

"SPOILER" This may be the first book where Nazis on the moon is used.

Robert A Heinlein wrote excellent books in the 1940 to the 1960s. In the later years his books tend to get long winded and not as adventure packed. The Heinlein Juveniles are where he shows his true high quality writing.
Celak
I enjoy classic sci-fi and I suspend my disbelief for the oldies like this that are pre-Space Age. The notion of a scientist and three precocious teens building a moon rocket with a nuclear propulsion system is pretty far fetched but hey, if you let it go, it's a fun read. The most notable and fun twist comes in the last part of the book. I won't be a plot spoiler, but anyone who has seen the sci-fi movie "Iron Sky" will get a real kick out of it.
hardy
I still think of this as the first adult science fiction book I ever read. I was in 4th grade and my teacher sent me to the high school library to find a book. I was walking up the steps into the library when I looked left and saw the book, and the rocket ship label that you still find on s.f. books in some libraries.

Reading it today, I still find tight storytelling and logical adherence to the science of the day. If you want to have kids read it, consider asking them to identify logical gaps between known reality today and what Heinlein proposed for his tale.