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eBook Making Mead: A Complete Guide to the Making of Sweet and Dry Mead, Melomel, Metheglin, Hippocras, Pyment and Cyser download
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Author: Bryan Acton
ISBN: 0900841079
Pages 64 pages
Publisher Amateur Winemaker Book; F Canadian Edition Used edition (2012)
Language English
Category: No category
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 317
ePUB size: 1111 kb
FB2 size: 1227 kb
DJVU size: 1912 kb
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eBook Making Mead: A Complete Guide to the Making of Sweet and Dry Mead, Melomel, Metheglin, Hippocras, Pyment and Cyser download

by Bryan Acton


Mead is an alcoholic drink made by fermenting honey and water with yeast. When I decided to make mead again (after 20 years) I purchased this book over all the others I had collected

Mead is an alcoholic drink made by fermenting honey and water with yeast. A glass of lightly chilled mead on a summer's evening is a splendid delight. And yet, of all the crafts of mankind, mead-making is certainly one of the oldest. It is likely that mead was made even before the wheel was invented as stone-age cave paintings depict the collection of honey from bee colonies. The drink made from honey became a staple of Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Medieval and Renaissance Britain. When I decided to make mead again (after 20 years) I purchased this book over all the others I had collected.

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item 2 Making Mead by Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan Paperback NEW Book -Making Mead by Bryan Acton and Peter . Mead is an alcoholic drink made by fermenting honey and water with yeast; of all the crafts of mankind, mead-making is certainly one of the oldest.

item 2 Making Mead by Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan Paperback NEW Book -Making Mead by Bryan Acton and Peter Duncan Paperback NEW Book. Free postage 9780900841071 -Making Mead A Complete Guide to the Making of Sweet and Dry Me. . This practical book will inspire you to take up this admirable craft. It includes chapters on honey selection, mead-making techniques, and forty-two recipes.

Mead is an alcoholic drink made by fermenting honey and water with yeast. And yet, of all the crafts of mankind, mead-making is certainly one of the oldest

Mead is an alcoholic drink made by fermenting honey and water with yeast.

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Amateur Winemaker/G. We've done so quite rarely over the years. List this Seller's Books.

Making Mead : A Complete Guide to the Making of Sweet & Dry Mead, Melomel, Metheglin, Hippocras, Pyment & Cyser. By (author) Bryan Acton, By (author) Peter Duncan.

Everything about mead making, tutorials, videos, articles and more covering everything . Greg has been making mead for a while and he has sent us some pictures of his mead including this amazing 54 Liter Italian.

Everything about mead making, tutorials, videos, articles and more covering everything from fermenting to bottling. Great experience and I got it all on video. Watch as Will makes a meal and enjoys some mead. Greg has been making mead for a while and he has sent us some pictures of his mead including this amazing 54 Liter Italian Carboy. Check it all out here: Greg's Mead. NEW ARTICLE: Troubleshooting Your mead - Wondering if your mead is ok?

Mead is an alcoholic drink made by fermenting honey and water with yeast. A glass of lightly chilled mead on a summer's evening is a splendid delight. And yet, of all the crafts of mankind, mead-making is certainly one of the oldest. It is likely that mead was made even before the wheel was invented as stone-age cave paintings depict the collection of honey from bee colonies. The drink made from honey became a staple of Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Medieval and Renaissance Britain. This practical book will inspire you to take up this admirable craft. It includes chapters on honey selection, mead-making techniques, and forty-two recipes for mead, melomel (using honey mixed with fruit juice), pyment (honey mixed with grapes), hippocras (honey mixed with grapes and herbs), metheglin (spiced medicinal mead), cyser (honey mixed with apples) and other honey drinks.
Alianyau
I actually followed the mead making instructions written by the authors in my first attempt to make a batch of basic mead. A complete waste of honey. The fermentation barely started and finally fizzled out after about six months with most of the honey still unfermented. I later found out (from another book listed here on Amazon in which the word "complete" is misspelled to read "compleat," that honey is slightly acidic and ADDING more acid (as recommended by these authors)actually retards fermentation explaining my results.
I'm not sure when this pamphlet written, but my copy is dated 1990 and it notes that it entered it's sixteenth printing in 1984. Apparetnly an awful lot has been learned about honey and mead making since then and I would strongly recommend NOT using this outdated information. It might just convince you that mead making is impossible, but it's actually fairly easy (much easier than beer making for example) and fun!
Akir
This is a small volume, but packed full of useful and interesting information. The recipes are clear, but you do want to have a little experience with making wine before you start.
cyrexoff
I originally bought this book in the early 70's, then lost my copy. When I decided to make mead again (after 20 years) I purchased this book over all the others I had collected. It's all you need to get started, and after you start you can experiment on your own.
Capella
Very basic and easy to follow. Don't start your meadery with it!
Fenius
Received book with different cover, which I already owned dated 1992 and was in very good condition. Book is better for some background on history as many recipes use ingredients not found in my part of the USA. .
adventure time
Written by a novice!
kewdiepie
Great addition to any home brewers library. This book is filled with some great one gallon recipes. I have followed a few recipes with great success.
I'll be brief and blunt. This book offers an ambitious title, but just doesn't deliver the goods.

Flaws:
* If you exclude the front & rear matter, this books weighs in at a paltry 54 pages. That's not even a proper book ... it's more of a small pamphlet, with a glossy cover that tries ties to pretend it's a real book. I've seem 'chap' books that are thicker, and have far more content.
* Weakly researched in general.
* Extremely thin on useful details and techniques.
* Little useful information on fruit processing.
* Some of their choices in yeast strains appear ill advised and/or illogical.
* Their sulfiting technique is somewhat heavyhanded and overly simplistic.
* They appear to have a very weak grasp on recipe construction and acid/tannin balancing in general. Rather than teaching the reader the HOW and WHY of constructing and testing recipes for various types of fruit (not to mention pairing them with appropriate varieties of honey, and explaining the how/why of that as well), they simply just shoved a random assortment of poorly constructed, unbalanced, and underexplained recipes into their book, and expect the reader to just follow along without asking questions ... and just blindly trust to the equally undescribed results.

There's no greater turnoff for me than laziness and incompetence, and this book has a bit too much of both, in my opinion. Even in a topic as poorly covered as this one, there are far better books on the subject out there. I have scads of old meadmaking newsletters (and even an incomplete pamphlet of my own) that are more thorough than this offering, so my advice is to save your money. Easily one of the weakest books in my entire winemaking collection.

Heck, Charlie Papazian did a far better, and more thorough, job of discussing mead in the appendix of "The New Complete Joy of Homebrewing" ... and that's a book about BEER (his chapter on mead was really just a brief gung-ho afterthought).