eBook Warrior Class download
Mystery and Suspense
Author: Dale Brown
ISBN: 0399147144
Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense
Pages 448 pages
Publisher Putnam Adult; First Edition edition (May 7, 2001)
Language English
Category: Mystery and Suspense
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 376
ePUB size: 1338 kb
FB2 size: 1680 kb
DJVU size: 1700 kb
Other formats: lrf lit rtf lrf

eBook Warrior Class download

by Dale Brown


Warrior Class Mass Market Paperback – May 7, 2002.

Warrior Class Mass Market Paperback – May 7, 2002. by. Dale Brown (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Air Force captain Dale Brown is the author of several best-selling tion-adventure novels: Flight of the Old Dog (1987), Silver Tower (1988), Day of the Cheetah (1989), Hammerheads (1990), Sky Masters (1991), Night of the Hawk (1992), Chains of Command (1993), Storming Heaven (1994) and Shadows of Steel (1996).

Warrior Class (2001) - Set in 2001, Russian billionaire Pavel Kazakov builds a huge pipeline through the Balkans with the support of the . Brown and Jim DeFelice have created more than a dozen Dale Brown's Dreamland books.

Warrior Class (2001) - Set in 2001, Russian billionaire Pavel Kazakov builds a huge pipeline through the Balkans with the support of the Russian Army and everybody gets rich. To make the scheme viable, he also finances the deployment of a secret stealth fighter-bomber originally developed by the same company that employed Dave Luger.

Air Force captain Dale Brown is the author of several best-selling tion-adventure novels: Flight of the Old Dog (1987), Silver Tower (1988), Day of the Cheetah (1989), Hammerheads (1990), Sky Masters (1991), Night of the Hawk (1992), Chains of Command (1993), Storming. Heaven (1994) and Shadows of Steel (1996). Dale was born in Buffalo, New York on November 2, 1956. He graduated from Penn State University and received an Air Force commission in 1978.

Warrior class dale brown the best military adventure writer in the country today. Berkley Books are published by The Berkley Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Putnam Inc. Clive Cussler Dale Brown is a superb storyteller. Griffin A master of mixing. Berkley Books are published by The Berkley Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Putnam In. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, BERKLEY and the ‘ B design. are trademarks belonging to Penguin Putnam Inc. Printed in the united states of america.

During the party, he and his friends would find out more about the girls, then update the black book even more.

Okay, Annie, David said cheerfully. During the party, he and his friends would find out more about the girls, then update the black book even more. Did they have a car? Their own place? Did they like the outdoors? Movies? Quiet dinners? Wild parties?

The world is falling apart, and there are plenty of people willing to take advantage.

The world is falling apart, and there are plenty of people willing to take advantage . Brown Locks On for Another Winner. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago. I like this guy better than Clancy. I have read every book he has written. The early books, starting with The Flight of the Old Dog were first rate and very believeable.

Patrick McLanahan, the hero pilot from Dale Brown's blockbuster debut, Flight of the Old Dog, returns in his newest bestseller, Warrior Class. A Russian oil magnate seizes power using the army to back him up. Soon, Russia will dominate Europe-unless McLanahan turns a simple rescue operation into full-scale havoc.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Brown Dale Xwarrior Class Book 9780007724536 at the best online . Title : Xwarrior Class. Authors : Brown Dale. Product Category : Books. List Price (MSRP) : . 9. Condition : Like New.

Title : Xwarrior Class.

With the world in chaos, a Russian oil baron seeks to exploit the situation and dominate Europe in the name of profit, but an American Air Force rescue mission, led by Air Force General Patrick McLanahan, could drag the United States into the brewing conflict. 175,000 first printing.
Whitestone
I like this guy better than Clancy. I have read every book he has written. The early books, starting with The Flight of the Old Dog were first rate and very believeable. As time has passed, the technology involved in his tales has started to stetch one's ability to believe, but one gets the impression that he really knows what he is talking about and he doesn't bore you to death with technocrat explanations.
In this book, the US has elected an isolationist President who is not a member of either major political party. The character is interesting, but he never could have been elected holding the beliefs that he does, so we have to fudge our way past that and just declare him elected. Once that is accomplished he skips his Innauguration, gets sworn in privately at Blair House and walks across the street to the White House and goes to work. He also decides not to do a State of the Union speech, which isn't a bad idea. When you think of it, maybe he could get elected after all.
In any event, the new president starts withdrawing US forces around the globe which leads to predictable instability in the geopolitical situation. Into the chaos walks Pavel Kazakov, a Russian gangster with a desire to build an oil pipeline to the Baltic, millions of dollars at his disposal and his very own stealth-bomber which was left over from the breakup of the USSR. He sets about to wreak havoc in the Balkans and to take advantage of the void in NATO's ability to respond to get the oil flowing to the Black Sea and millions of dollars a day flowing into his bank accounts.
Standing in the way of his plans are Patrick McClanahan and his usual support staff from Dreamland and Skymasters along with some very brave Turkish and Ukranian pilots. I thought the action was first rate and you really look forward to the final confrontation as the bad guys are about to get theirs. For no matter how difficult the assignment, or how many obstacles are thrown in the path of our heroes, you can take it to the bank that the bad guys will get theirs. How they do it if most of the fun.
Nicanagy
I'm a gearhead. I race cars, I work on computers, I like knowing how stuff works. Brown gives you lots of juicy details about how he envisions hypothetical technologies working. He isnt afraid to go out on a limb and invent stuff that doesnt exist -- but he does the reader the courtesy of at least explaining how he believes it would work.
Dale Brown does an excellent job of dreaming up fictitious war machines. Imagine the "Red October" submarine -- only twice as dangerous. Manned by gregarious and charismatic characters that keep you interested and "rooting for the good guys."
Brown is not particularly good at writing a realistic novel. It is my assertion however, that he does not set out intent to do so. He writes books about the superheros of warfare in the sense that Comic Book authors write about various super powers.
He has a vivid imagination and a seemingly accurate grasp of where things in the world lie, and paints a semibelievable political situation.
He has an uncanny knack for combat scenes. It's very cool to read twenty pages of one engagement. This is something Clancy doesnt do. Clancy is interested in the "bigger picture." Brown actually "zooms in" and lets you take part in the nitty gritty, people-are-dying-and-bombs-are-flying melee.
There is I guess only one real complaint I have about this book, and I have had it about his previous books (and kept coming back): His extensive use of (correct) russian. I'm not interested in reading russian in italics and attempting to figure out what it means later (as it turns out I have a native russian co-worker). However the book was enormously entertaining and kept me up a couple nights to finish it.
Certainly recommended to fans of Brown in general, and possibly recommended to people looking for a change from the dry cookie cutter stuff Clancy has been writing for years.
Brakora
First: I am (or was) a Dale Brown fan. I loved "Flight of the Old Dog" and "Shadows of Steel", two of his best. Then... "The Tin Man" came, and nothing was the same again. OK, in all his books North Americans are tough but sensible, intelligent but down-to-earth, loveably undisciplined but real team players, capable, loyal, and honest, etc. etc. Enemies, however they are, are nasty, ugly, stupid, heartless, unimaginative, ruthless, corrupt, and so on. American allies try to be American and can't make it but we love them anyway for trying. Prior books had so much action, technical data and suspense that we could easily "suspend disbelief".
Many of Brown's stories are based on the cycle: thing must be done/USA government won't let us/do it anyway(blowing up half the non-USA landscape in the process)/escape miraculously/all forgotten due to achievement. In prior books one enjoyed so much all that happened that we forgot that basically, all books are the same!
Now, suspense is impossible, as we all know that USA's planes will get through, and once most of the trash (that is any non-American that is not an American-lover) is blown to bits, the Tin Mans go in and kill all the rest. Help!.
In conclusion, I believe Mr. Brown has gone the Clancy way, his books today must be written by a ghost group and he will continue to produce Tin Man drivel as long as he can sell it. What a pity, I really loved the man. Maybe I�ll buy �Wings of Fire�, just to see if Brown goes back to his old style.