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eBook In the Shadow of Gotham (Detective Simon Ziele) download
Mystery and Suspense
Author: Stefanie Pintoff
ISBN: 0312628129
Subcategory: Mystery
Pages 385 pages
Publisher Minotaur Books; 1st edition (May 11, 2010)
Language English
Category: Mystery and Suspense
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 363
ePUB size: 1202 kb
FB2 size: 1938 kb
DJVU size: 1960 kb
Other formats: mobi docx lrf lrf

eBook In the Shadow of Gotham (Detective Simon Ziele) download

by Stefanie Pintoff


Detective Simon Ziele lost his fiancée in the General Slocum ferry . If you like forensics, the workings of the criminal mind or books like Caleb Carr's Alienist, In the Shadow of Gotham should be on your TBR list.

Detective Simon Ziele lost his fiancée in the General Slocum ferry disaster-a thousand perished on that summer day in 1904 when an onboard fire burned the boat down in the waters of the East River. Still reeling from the tragedy, Ziele transferred to a police department north of New York, to escape the city and all the memories it conjured. But only a Dobson, New York, 1905.

Stefanie Pintoff is an American author of historical mystery novels. Stefanie Pintoff’s books take place in New York City in the early 1900s

Stefanie Pintoff is an American author of historical mystery novels. Stefanie Pintoff’s books take place in New York City in the early 1900s. Her character Simon Ziele is a police detective who lost his fiancée in a steamship accident, and Alistair Sinclair is a talented and egotistical criminologist. Her work is known for intricate plots and historical details, with a focus on early criminal science.

Despite the late hour, Joe was awake, reading in the front parlor that had become his convalescence room tories, to the second-floor . .

Despite the late hour, Joe was awake, reading in the front parlor that had become his convalescence room tories, to the second-floor bedroom that would have isolated him from the daily rhythms of life in the village. As a result, the sofa had been converted into his sickbed, and a bookcase brought in with all manner of reading material. After I peered in the window and confirmed he was up, I tapped at the glass, and then let myself in through the front door at his signal

Secret of the White Rose (Simon Ziele Series by Stefanie Pintoff. The murder of Judge Hugo Jackson is out of Detective Simon Ziele's jurisdiction in more ways than one.

Secret of the White Rose (Simon Ziele Series by Stefanie Pintoff. Not her best, but still a good historical murder mystery set in New York City. Stefanie Pintoff, author of the Eve Rossi thriller series and other novels. Be part of the world’s largest community of book lovers on Goodreads.

Detective Simon Ziele lost his fianceé in the wreck of the General Slocum and shortly thereafter headed to Westchester County to escape the violence of the city. But just a few months into his tenure, he catches the worst homicide of his career: a young woman is brutally murdered in her own bedroom in the middle of a winter afternoon. A day's investigating leads him to Columbia University's noted criminologist, Alistair Sinclair, and one of his subjects, Michael Fromley, who has a history of violent behavior and brutal fantasies

Dobson, New York, 1905. I thoroughly enjoyed reading In the Shadow of Gotham.

Dobson, New York, 1905. The author brings the reader seamlessly into the world of New York in 1905 where modern methods of crime solving are just evolving. The characters, both the good and the evil, and the in-between, are interesting, flawed people who are doing their best (or worst) in an imperfect world.

The investigating detective, Simon Ziele, is recovering from the death of his fiancée in a ferry disaster. Soon afterwards, he is contacted by a university professor, Alistair Sinclair, a pioneering criminologist, who claims to know the identity of the killer

The investigating detective, Simon Ziele, is recovering from the death of his fiancée in a ferry disaster. Soon afterwards, he is contacted by a university professor, Alistair Sinclair, a pioneering criminologist, who claims to know the identity of the killer. He believes that it is someone he has interviewed extensively and who has told him of his homicidal fantasies, which turned out to be closely similar to the way the woman was murdered. But evidence is hard to find.

In the Shadow of Gotham (Detective Simon Ziele). Praise for In the Shadow of Gotham. Superior historical myster. he does an outstanding job of blending historical detail with engaging characters and a suspenseful plot. A Curtain Falls (Detective Simon Ziele). The period detail, characterizations, and plotting are all top-notch, and Ziele has enough depth to carry a series.

Dobson, New York, 1905.

Detective Simon Ziele lost his fiancée in the General Slocum ferry disaster―a thousand perished on that summer day in 1904 when an onboard fire burned the boat down in the waters of the East River. Still reeling from the tragedy, Ziele transferred to a police department north of New York, to escape the city and all the memories it conjured.

But only a few months into his new life in a quiet country town, he's faced with the most shocking homicide of his career to date: Young Sarah Wingate has been brutally murdered in her own bedroom in the middle of an otherwise calm and quiet winter afternoon. After just one day of investigation, Simon's contacted by Columbia University's noted criminologist Alistair Sinclair, who offers a startling claim about one of his patients, Michael Fromley―that the facts of the murder bear an uncanny resemblance to Fromley's deranged mutterings.

But what would have led Fromley, with his history of violent behavior and brutal fantasies, to seek out Sarah, a notable mathematics student and a proper young lady who has little in common with his previous targets? Is Fromley really a murderer, or is someone mimicking him?

This is what Simon Ziele must find out, with the help of the brilliant but self-interested Alistair Sinclair―before the killer strikes again.

With this taut, atmospheric, and original story of a haunted man who must search for a killer while on the run from his own demons, Stefanie Pintoff's In the Shadow of Gotham marks the debut of an outstanding new talent, the inaugural winner of the Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America Best First Crime Novel Competition.

In the Shadow of Gotham is the winner of the 2010 Edgar Award for Best First Novel.

Samulkree
I saw Pintoff's books recommended in an article by Jason Pinter, and knew immediately that I had to add them to my wish list. This was an entertaining depiction of turn-of-the-century investigation, where one often had to rely more upon luck than physical evidence. Not only do we see the earliest days of forensics, where even fingerprinting is brand new, but we see the beginnings of the use of criminology. It's a time period I find particularly interesting to read about; a world caught somewhere between the past and the present.

I liked Simon Ziele. He was a little bit of a fish out of water in the rural town we meet him in, but really comes into his own once he is let loose upon the city again. He's fragile in a way; not just physically, but emotionally. The ferry disaster that took the life of his fiancé has affected him in ways he would rather not reveal. You want to root for him to not only have success professionally, but to find happiness personally.

As for the mystery, it spins its wheels a bit at times until Ziele turns to the techniques he finds tried and true. Despite the study of criminology being central to the story, it's not the star in the end. The reveal didn't completely surprise me, but parts of it did.

A good historical mystery always pleases me, so I look forward to reading more of Pintoff's series.
Malodora
I whipped through "Shadow" fairly quickly, as the narrative had a great deal of energy and thrust, and I enjoy historical settings, especially this era in NYC. I think many readers will enjoy "Shadow", but I was curiously unmoved. For one, I pretty much guessed where the "ending" was going way, way before it started to turn down that path; I also found it hard to believe the reasons/rationalizations for the murders.

I was amused by how much the story felt like a 1900's version of the TV shows CSI and Criminal Minds.

And while i did enjoy many of the historical references - especially the bow made to the great French detective Vidocq - far too much of it was almost a case of name-dropping, as if Ms Pintoff kept going through her notes to see what bit of historicity she could give us, almost like the guide on a tour bus. And while there were plenty of these scattered throughout, rather randomly, I just did not get much of a feel for NYC in 1905. (I think it was 1905.) Of course, that was not the point of the story; then again, it would have made the book far better than just a fairly interesting read.
Naa
I had high hopes for this book, and the mystery story was clever, if slightly predictable. The book is set in the early 1900s, but there is no flavor of that era; it reads like a modern detective story and I kept having to remind myself of the time period. The writing is just terrible -- sloppy and loaded with repetition. I did enjoy the book but not enough to read another in the series.
Falya
I wanted so badly to like this book, because I love murder mysteries set during the 1890s-1900s. But this book pales in comparison to the vast majority of others I've read. The attention to period detail was marginal at best, and sometimes just plain wrong ("He bought a cup of coffee and a newspaper on his way to work." I'm not aware of any paper cups being available in 1905 to allow takeout coffee).

The story had promise at the beginning but then it started meandering; it felt as if the writer was making some of it up as she went along, and then decided who the killer would be at the end.

That being said, I liked the main characters, and I think this author has potential, but I really don't believe this novel, as her first one, deserved all the awards and acclaim it received.
lubov
First, I am surprised that this is the author's first book. It is an exceptional book. She doesn't depend on NY as much as Caleb Carr does in The Alienist and as a result, in my opinion, her mystery was more engrossing while still using the dark side of NYC to develop her novel. Also, unlike Carr, I wasn't left feeling empty at the end, albeit wishing for a little more.

The characters are well developed the book a page turner and engrossing narrative.

If I have a criticism of the book, it is that I would have like a few more twists to the end; I will leave at that as I do not wish to ruin the book for those of you who decide to buy it.

I really enjoy this genre of novel and Anatomy of Deception, The Alienist and now Shadow of Gotham are some of the best I have read.
Gandree
ok
Delan
I read this one a while ago and always intended to review it but am just getting around to it now. My expectations were very high for this piece since it was a major award winner. The writing was crisp and the mystery kept my interest. The protagonist, however, did not. His actions were a bit too predictable and sterile. Almost robotic. I simply had a hard time relating to him and it took out of the story. With that being said, I think most fans of the mystery genre will enjoy this book.
It is enjoyable and teaches lots of New York City history; however, the plot is pretty predictable.