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eBook The Curse of the Pharaohs download
Mystery and Suspense
Author: Elizabeth Peters
ISBN: 0396079636
Subcategory: Mystery
Pages 357 pages
Publisher Dodd Mead; First Edition edition (May 1, 1981)
Language English
Category: Mystery and Suspense
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 260
ePUB size: 1888 kb
FB2 size: 1671 kb
DJVU size: 1781 kb
Other formats: mbr lrf azw lit

eBook The Curse of the Pharaohs download

by Elizabeth Peters


In the shadows beyond the lantern rays loomed a solid mass -the end of the passageway, blocked, as the entrance had been, by a barrier of stone.

In the shadows beyond the lantern rays loomed a solid mass -the end of the passageway, blocked, as the entrance had been, by a barrier of stone. nding gesture and we followed him out into the vestibule at the foot of the stairs. Wiping dust from my streaming brow, I gazed reproachfully at my husband.

Elizabeth Peters is Agatha Christie in an ancient Egyptian wig and headdress. This detective, Egyptologist, and mother of one narrates with wit and humor, puncturing Victorian decorum with her steel-tipped parasol, amazing the reader with her (sometimes stupid) bravery and her unique way of both adoring and defying her Egyptologist husband.

I love Elizabeth Peters books In this book Emerson and Amelia are taking over an excavation launched by Lord Baskerville in the Valley of the Kings

I love Elizabeth Peters books. She gives such a good description of the Egyptian archaeological dig sites that I could easily visualize them. I have read several of her books three or four times, but always enjoy them like it was the first time I've read them. I believe that anyone interested in Egyptian archaeology will enjoy these books. In this book Emerson and Amelia are taking over an excavation launched by Lord Baskerville in the Valley of the Kings. When Lord Baskerville dies suddenly and for no apparent reason, his beautiful widow hires Emerson. Amelia accompanies him.

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The Laughter of Dead Kings. The fabled burial ground of the great pharaohs of ancient Egypt held no charm for him; it was just a job, one he had held for more than ten years.

Elizabeth PetersThe Laughter of Dead Kingsto Roxie WalkerFOREWORD R ecently I discussed, with several mystery writer friends, the problem of what we sometimes call the current now. One of my series is set in real time; the characters age appropriately with each passing year and with each volume. The Vicky series, and those of many of my friends, don’t work that way. Vicky made her first appearance in 1973. The Laughter of Dead Kings.

Books related to The Curse of the Pharaohs. More by Elizabeth Peters. The Last Camel Died at Noon.

Accidents continue to plague the dig, and talk of a pharaoh's curse runs rampant among the group. Amelia begins to suspect that these accidents are caused by a sinister human, but who? show more. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland. You can learn more at: ameliapeabody.

Peters' Curse is a Success. com User, April 27, 2000. What could prompt gentlewoman Amelia (Peabody) Emerson to leave behind her young son and comfortable Victorian lifestyle to perform manual labor halfway around the world? - A love for Egyptology and a promising archeological site, of course.

Despite rumors of a curse haunting all those involved with the dig, Amelia and Radcliffe proceed to Egypt and realize that Sir Henry did not die a natural death. Accidents continue to plague the dig, and talk of a pharaoh's curse runs rampant among the group. Amelia begins to suspect that these accidents are caused by a sinister human, but who?

The Curse of the Pharaohs is a historical mystery novel by Elizabeth Peters, the second in the Amelia Peabody series of novels; it takes place in the excavation season of 1892-93.

The Curse of the Pharaohs is a historical mystery novel by Elizabeth Peters, the second in the Amelia Peabody series of novels; it takes place in the excavation season of 1892-93. The Emersons are at home in England, aching to return to Egypt, but finding no excuse to return until Lady Baskerville asks them to finish the excavation started by her husband, who died mysteriously just before opening a tomb in Luxor

The witty, indefatigable Amelia Peabody--now married to the woman-hating archaeologist Radcliffe Emerson-eludes the villains and solves three murders in this adventure set among the archaeological digs in the Valley of the Kings
Уou ll never walk alone
I gather from some of the reviews I have read that there are people who dislike Amelia Peabody Emerson, her husband Radcliffe, and the plot of "Curse of the Pharaohs."
I, on the other hand, very much enjoyed this book by the late Elizabeth Peters. I like the fact that the book was set in late Victorian times and that it takes place - mostly - in Egypt. I like the fact that, during a period in English history (and American history, for that matter) when women were treated as little more than children that Amelia managed to forge a career alongside her husband. I like the fact that Peters took into account the manners and mores of upper-crust English society when writing this novel and that she remained faithful to the times when women of Amelia's standing did not raise their children but left much of that job to nannies and tutors. Finally, I like the fact that Amelia is tough physically, mentally, and emotionally: That she has the spirit and the spine to undertake an often-dangerous occupation that challenges not only her mind but also her body.
The plot is a little convoluted, which is not a bad thing in my opinion, and revolves around the death of an English nobleman well known for funding archaeological digs in Egypt. The nobleman's widow appeals to Amelia and her husband to finish the work her late spouse was funding and before long the Emerson's are off to Egypt on an adventure. There they find themselves in the midst of thieves, murderers, and untrustworthy sorts of all kinds.
To those that didn't like this book all I can do is apologize because I found that reading this novel was great fun; it's an enjoyable story set in an exotic locale with characters that resonate.
Peters had a distinctive narrative style, often peppering her stories with interesting archaeological tidbits about the ancient pharaohs who ruled Egypt in the days when it was the preeminent power in Africa and the Middle East. Her writing always moved the story forward at a fairly rapid pace.
My take: This is a 5-star read.
Runeshaper
The Curse of the Pharaohs, second of the Amelia Peabody saga by Elizabeth Peters, is not quite as good as the first volume, Crocodile on the Sandbank. This is because the first book was intended to stand alone, as a mystery novel set in Egypt during the Edwardian age, and as such was practically perfect. So good, in fact, that the author decided to follow up with a long series featuring Amelia Peabody and her family and friends, always using Egypt as a setting. Each work is very carefully researched, and the characters are true to life. Mysteries, of corse, abound, obliging our heroine Amelia to use her considerable skills as amateur detective and archaeologist to unravel the tangled knots in the problematic situations she comes across. Each work in the series is excellent, but none of them quite reach the perfection of the first. However, the books are extremely addictive. The curse of this particular addiction is that the author has unfortunately passed away, leaving her readers with a craving for more; the onlt remedy to is start reading them all again from the beginning!
Made-with-Love
I love Elizabeth Peters books. She gives such a good description of the Egyptian archaeological dig sites that I could easily visualize them. I have read several of her books three or four times, but always enjoy them like it was the first time I've read them. I believe that anyone interested in Egyptian archaeology will enjoy these books.
Mushicage
This is the second in the Elizabeth Peters' Amelia Emerson Egyptian archaeological mystery series. Amelia and her husband Emerson (he hates his first name so goes by his last) now have a son nicknames Ramses, because of his precociousness and haughty expression (even at age 4).
They are called on to investigate a supposed "cursed" tomb. Of course, it isn't cursed, as Amelia has known from the beginning, but rather a dastardly plot to gain wealth.
This is the second in a series of 20 novels which cover more than 35 years. This is one of my favorite author's in her in my opinion, best series.
Swordsong
I was frankly embarrassed to be seen reading a book with such a silly title. But don't worry. The curse isn't real, and the reader knows it from the beginning.

Rumors of a curse make it easier for grave robbers to scare people off in nineteenth century Egypt, where Elizabeth Peters' intrepid Victorian archeologists are at work.

Before reading this book, I'd suggest reading Crocodile on the Sandbank, the first book in the series. Then you'll know how the marriage of archeologist Radcliffe Emerson and adventure traveler Amelia Peabody came about. They are equally opinionated, clever, unconventional and courageous. They bicker constantly - and are mad about each other.

In this book Emerson and Amelia are taking over an excavation launched by Lord Baskerville in the Valley of the Kings. When Lord Baskerville dies suddenly and for no apparent reason, his beautiful widow hires Emerson. Amelia accompanies him.

The reader has several murders to look forward to, and a whole host of well-drawn characters to suspect. But the real appeal of these books is the lively narration by Amelia Peabody Emerson, who is the opposite of the Victorian ideal.

Amelia is in great shape from laboring side by side with workman at the tomb site. When danger threatens her husband, she thinks nothing of running through the night to his rescue, a revolver in one hand and an almost equally lethal parasol in the other.

This is pure escapist reading, but wittily written and authentic as to its archeological details. Elizabeth Peters is an archeologist. I'll eventually read the next book in the series, and deal as best I can with another embarrassing title (The Mummy Case).