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eBook Cruel As The Grave (A Silver Dagger Mystery) download
Mystery and Suspense
Author: Dean James
ISBN: 1570721270
Subcategory: Mystery
Pages 202 pages
Publisher Overmountain Press; 1st edition (May 1, 2000)
Language English
Category: Mystery and Suspense
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 617
ePUB size: 1623 kb
FB2 size: 1579 kb
DJVU size: 1506 kb
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eBook Cruel As The Grave (A Silver Dagger Mystery) download

by Dean James


Cruel as the Grave book. My first novel-length mystery fiction, Cruel As The Grave, will be published in May 2000, by Silver Dagger Mysteries.

Cruel as the Grave book. I grew up in Mississippi, with scads of cousins all over the place, none of whom has ever married one another as far as I know. Sitting around on porches on hot summer days, listening to adults telling stories, I decided I wanted to tell stories, too.

Cruel As The Grave by Dean JamesMaggie McLendon is surprised when a letter from her father's Aunt Helen bearing bad news of the health of her Grandfather Henry McLendon, gains little reaction from her father Gerard. Although, Maggie had met her Aunt Helen on two occasions, she had learned as a child that the rest of the family was a taboo subject.

In Cruel as the Grave, Dean James brings to life a family burdened by dark secrets. Cruel as the Grave - Dean James. Determined sleuth Maggie McLendon peels away layers of hidden sadness to find the truth of her heritage in a haunting mystery steeped in the richness of Southern culture. Carolyn Hart, author of the Death on Demand and Henrie O mysteries "Cruel as the Grave is an engaging, literate novel of family secrets and skullduggery. Earlene Fowler, author of Seven Sisters "Cruel As The Grave exposes the underbelly of a Southern family, where secrets and skeletons lurk, cloaked in every imaginable guise.

Cruel as the Grave (A De. .has been added to your Cart. What I like most about Dean James's writing is his ability to plot a good cozy who-dunnit, and this book is no exception. What kept me reading was wanting to know the answer to the puzzle. James feeds in enough clues (and red herrings) to make readers feel we are making progress in identifying the murderer. Then, he surprises us with another twist, and sometimes another crime.

In Cruel as the Grave, Dean James brings to life a family burdened by dark secrets

In Cruel as the Grave, Dean James brings to life a family burdened by dark secrets. Determined sleuth Maggie McLendon peels away layers of hidden sadness to find the truth of her heritage in a haunting mystery steeped in the richness of Southern culture -" Carolyn Hart, author of the Death on Demand and Henrie O mysteries. Cruel as the Grave is an engaging, literate novel of family secrets and skullduggery. With a clever plot and appealing characterization, Mr. James has created the perfect English drawing room mystery set smack in the middle of steamy Mississippi

Miranda James is the pseudonym of Dean James, a seventh-generation Mississippian recently returned home after over thirty years in.His first novel, Cruel as the Grave (Silver Dagger Mysteries) was published in 2000

Miranda James is the pseudonym of Dean James, a seventh-generation Mississippian recently returned home after over thirty years in Texas. A mystery fan since the age of ten, he wrote his first novel at the ripe old age of twelve. The only copy of The Mystery of the Willow Key vanished years ago, but since it was highly derivative of the Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden mystery series, that’s probably a good thing. His first novel, Cruel as the Grave (Silver Dagger Mysteries) was published in 2000. Since then he has published eighteen more novels, writing under his own name and the pseudonyms Jimmie Ruth Evans and Honor Hartman.

Authors: James, Dean. Claim the "Cruel as the Grave. The Oracle: the Jubilean Mysteries Unveiled. Determined sleuth Maggie McLendon peels away layers of hidden sadness to find the truth of her heritage in a haunting mystery steeped in the richness of Southern culture

In Cruel as the Grave, Dean James brings to life a family burdened by dark secrets. James has created the perfect English drawing room mystery set smack in the middle of steamy Mississippi.

If her fabled beauty had faded, her wit had not, and her will was as finely honed as the sword of her most celebrated son, Richard Lionheart, the crusader king languishing in a German prison.

Jealousy is cruel as the grave. Song of Solomon 8:6-7. If her fabled beauty had faded, her wit had not, and her will was as finely honed as the sword of her most celebrated son, Richard Lionheart, the crusader king languishing in a German prison. But she was much more than Richard's mother, his invincible ally: She was his only hope. The torches sputtered in their wall sconces, sending up wavering fingers of flame.

If I'd wanted you dead, I'd have reached for my dagger, not a candlestick. Eleanor paused to sip from a silver goblet of watered down wine

If I'd wanted you dead, I'd have reached for my dagger, not a candlestick. The candlestick was faster," Justin said laconically, "what with John about to burst in the door," and got from Durand his first spontaneous smile. Jesu, but you're a cynical one, de Quincy. You're also a better talker than I expected. Whatever you said to John, it saved your skin. Eleanor paused to sip from a silver goblet of watered down wine. My so. e was well?" When he nodded, she drank again, her eyes on Justin's face.

Maggie McLendon should be at home in Houston, studying for her Ph.D. qualifying exams, but a letter from her great aunt arrives, bearing bad news. Maggie's grandfather, Henry McLendon, whom she has never met, is seriously ill in Jackson, Mississippi.

Maggie's father, English professor Gerard McLendon, has been estranged from his family since Maggie was an infant, but now there is perhaps one last chance for the McLendons to be reunited. The family welcomes Maggie and Gerard to Jackson, and Gerard has a chance to reconcile with his father.

But a murderer strikes, savagely, and Gerard McLendon looks like the chief suspect. Maggie must sort out decades of family secrets, including the puzzle of her grandmother's death twenty-five years before and its relationship to the present crime, to arrive at the truth. But not before the killer strikes a second time. Could Maggie or her father be next on the list?

Winenama
What I like most about Dean James's writing is his ability to plot a good cozy who-dunnit, and this book is no exception. What kept me reading was wanting to know the answer to the puzzle. James feeds in enough clues (and red herrings) to make readers feel we are making progress in identifying the murderer. Then, he surprises us with another twist, and sometimes another crime. And if you like historical as well as contemporary fiction, you'll find touches of both in this setting where modern folks still have a butler and call their living room a "drawing room."
Kajishakar
This is a story about Maggie, daughter of Gerard, and their southern estranged family living in the deep south. Gerard receives word that his father, Maggie's Grand-father, is in failing health and now may be the right time for a visit.

Maggie has many unanswered questions about her father's family since she's had little if any communication with them. This trip may hold the answers she seeks.

I was unable to connect with the characters in this story as I had been able to in so many of this authors other books. The chapters seemed quite long and tedious. unfortunately, There was just nothing that kept me reading.

If you have enjoyed this authors works in so many of his lovely books please try this series. This review is only one person's opinion.
Contancia
I enjoy reading Miranda James’ novels. They are well written and leave you not wanting to lay down the book or come to the end.
Painbrand
While I love the other books by this author (especially as Miranda James), this one bogged me down in too much detailed thinking and became a bit tedious. I had a little trouble keeping all the characters and their relationships straight, but that may be just me.
Ielonere
I couldn't seem to feel for any of the characters. I wasn't able to connect with them. And the author may need to look up The Lion in Winter and watch it. I believe Katharine Hepburn was the actress in this movie and not Audrey. To me it was downhill from that page on.
Cordaron
It was difficult for me to bond with the characters. They were like shadows or cut out cardboard people. The story line is promising but not well developed in my opinion.
Anarasida
It was like reading a mystery written in the 1900's or Agatha Christi. House has many people one is murdered, who done it.
Suppose that Dame Agatha Christie had allowed her wonderful creation,
Miss Jane Marple, to have married when that lady was young, and the
happy couple had a child. (Certainly Miss Marple would NEVER have had
a child without having first been married!) Had this happened, it
would not then be too much of a stretch to also imagine that Miss
Magnolia Amelia McLendon could be the grand-daughter or perhaps great
grand-daughter of said Miss Marple. Intelligent, a keen observer of
both her surroundings and the people who inhabit those surroundings,
Maggie is yet a modern young miss, working on her pre-Ph.d exams,
when her life is turned upside down. A letter from the only aunt
she's ever known, her father's Aunt Helena--pleads with them to
return to the family home in Jackson, Mississippi, for two reasons.
One is the illness of the family patriarch, Maggie's grandfather, who
is, after all 80 years old, but the bigger news is that the 27
year-long breach in the family is ready to be mended.
For a variety
of reasons, all of this family history is news to Maggie, and she
urges her father, Gerard, to accept the invitation, and to include
both of them in the visit. He grudgingly accepts, inadvertently
setting off modern-day reactions to events of long ago, including a
previously unsuspected murder.
From the very first person she
meets--Adrian Worthington--driver/butler/whatever, but all too
intriguing, through aunts, uncle, cousins--the ambiance of the South
is never far from the surface, although the family secrets are
anything but that. Using the legacy of Miss Marple, (for whom both the
author and his characters freely profess a fondness) Maggie patiently
sorts through all the events, both current and past, to find the
solution.
It is rare indeed, for an author to begin with
award-winning non-fiction, proceed to highly-praised short fiction,
then graduate to a full-length mystery story, but what a pleasure this
journey by Dean James provides for us all. If you, too, share a
fondness for the works of Dame Agatha, or any of the other past
classical mistresses of mystery, you should also enjoy this
wonderfully civil, witty and well-written recreation of the classical
British country house mystery novel. It's just been transported to
the American South, that's all!