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eBook Everybody Smokes in Hell download
Mystery and Suspense
Author: John Ridley
ISBN: 0375401431
Subcategory: Mystery
Pages 256 pages
Publisher Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.; 1st edition (August 17, 1999)
Language English
Category: Mystery and Suspense
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 688
ePUB size: 1922 kb
FB2 size: 1586 kb
DJVU size: 1561 kb
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eBook Everybody Smokes in Hell download

by John Ridley


Ridley's Everybody Smokes In Hell, however, provides a refreshing voice in crime fiction. The plot isn't much to write home about. Down and out youth in . stumbles into a bad situation and finds himself on the run from all kinds of nasty folks. The way this plot is executed is amazing.

Ridley's Everybody Smokes In Hell, however, provides a refreshing voice in crime fiction. The characters Ridley comes up with are unique and colorful, each with unique motivations subtly sketched by the author. Dialogue is fresh and crisp, presented the way people talk, not just an author's bland translation. Action is quick and descriptions show no restraint.

Everybody Smokes In Hell book. Hollywood nights are for people with name tags. It would have been better if he focused on writing well rather than on creating a writing style.

Everybody smokes in hell. by. Ridley, John, 1965-. New York : Ballantine Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. His name tag reads Paris Scott. A night clerk in a low-rent convenience store, living off his last dollar, freshly kicked to the curb by his girlfriend; it might as well say: "loser. Until a chance encounter with a filthy vagrant leads to a Bel Air mansion, a dead rock star's last gasp on tape, and a chance for Paris to flirt with a dream.

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Everybody Smokes In Hell - John Ridley. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 16 years ago. Everyday some new piece of crime fiction comes out that's almost indistinguishable from novels already sitting on bookstore shelves

Everybody Smokes In Hell - John Ridley. Everyday some new piece of crime fiction comes out that's almost indistinguishable from novels already sitting on bookstore shelves.

For other people named John Ridley, see John Ridley (disambiguation). Ridley went on to write the novels Love Is a Racket and Everybody Smokes in Hell. His novel Spoils of War was adapted into the 1999 David O. Russell-directed Three Kings

For other people named John Ridley, see John Ridley (disambiguation). American writer and director. Ridley at the Stockholm Film Festival in 2013. Russell-directed Three Kings. Ridley then became a writer and a supervising producer on the NBC crime drama Third Watch. Written by John Ridley. Narrated by Peter Francis James. From the dark desperation of Los Angeles to the false neon hope of Las Vegas, acclaimed author John Ridley steers a viciously careening ride through a world of dope dealers, Hollywood agents, two-bit felons, and three-dollar strippers. Narrator Peter Francis James expertly voices the flamboyant longings of people who will pay any price to flirt with a dream-even if it's someone else's.

Written by John Ridley, Audiobook narrated by Peter Francis James. Narrator Peter Francis James expertly voices the flamboyant longings of people who will pay any price to flirt with a dream, even if it's someone else's.

Hollywood nights are for people with name tags. From the snarling vastness of Los Angeles to the neon-lit inferno of Las Vegas, John Ridley charts a one-way ride into a glittering hell of blood, bodies, and broken hearts. Dope dealers, Hollywood agents, two-bit felons, three-dollar strippers, honest Joes, and an increasingly desperate Paris Scott-no one comes out clean in this raucous ride that turns an obsession with fame and fortune into a dangerous game of truth and consequence. It’s a wild place where dying large is a must, every crime is a thrill, and the finest pleasures are the guilty ones

John Ridley -- author of Stray Dogs and Love Is a Racket -- is back with a scathingly funny, outrageous new novel that chronicles the mayhem unleashed by the misadventures of one hapless young man trying to make it in Hollywood.Paris Scott can't make anything work out. A failed Hollywood screenwriter, he works nights at a convenience store, and drives a '74 Gremlin. And he was just dumped by his best girl. But when the last master tape of a freshly-suicided rock star and a small fortune's worth of stolen drugs fall into his lap, he seems to have stumbled on the key to his dreams.It might as well be a neutron bomb.Although the people who want the dope get themselves dangerously confused with the people who want the tape, it's clear to everyone that Paris is the target. And how does a guy who's wanted dead stay alive? "Get out of town, get some money, then get more out of town." Paris puts his Gremlin in gear and the resulting chase and chain- reaction madness stretches from Los Angeles to Las Vegas leaving a trail of blood, bodies, and broken hearts in its wake.Dope dealers, Hollywood agents, two-bit criminals, three-bit criminals, waitresses, rock stars, strippers, beautiful women, not-so-beautiful women, honest working Joes and psychopaths -- no one comes out clean in this raucous romp-and-stomp. It's John Ridley at his most devilishly sly, laying out proof that, without a doubt, everybody smokes in hell.
Altad
The critics are correct; Ridley IS a talented writer with a gift for certain character styles. The sad thing about this book is that the wonderful writing is overshadowed by an awful plot and characters you more than likely won't care about. Some writers make the mistake of having a good story and writing it poorly, expecting the plot to make up for it. Ridley has done the opposite, and expected his gifted writing to make up for a predictable, asinine, unengaging plot. There are no twists, exactly what you think is going to happen does, and the feeling you have after reading this book will be the same as binging on junk food. It tastes good at first, but as soon as you're done, you'll wonder why the hell you bothered.
lolike
This is absolutely one of my favorite books! From the beginning you are drawn into this world and biting your nails until the end! It would be so awesome if they made this a movie !!!I would want to be in it!!!
Kinashand
Read it twice
Steamy Ibis
I love John Ridley's writing!
Kekinos
Has there been a filmmaker who has been more imitated in the last decade than Quentin Tarantino? His use of language, his gift for plotting, and his knack for memorable characters (in the movies PULP FICTION, RESERVOIR DOGS and JACKIE BROWN) have inspired more bad movies and novels since George Lucas unleashed STAR WARS on the world.
Now, I am not trying to knock the credible talent that John Ridley has. And perhaps it's unfair to complain of imitation. After all, it is a form of flattery. Tarantino himself admits the variety of sources and inspirations for his movies, including the novels of Elmore Leonard and Jim Thompson. But that said, EVERYBODY SMOKES IN HELL is a novel that cries out for Tarantino to adapt it for the screen. It is a movie of desperate people doing desperate things, of thugs and molls, gangsters and hitmen, and generally unpleasant people. In fact, Tarantino might not attempt an adaptation purely for the reason that it is too similar to his earlier works (I found the tone and plot of EVERYBODY SMOKES to be remarkably similar to Tarantino's script for TRUE ROMANCE).
The plot is thus: Paris Scott, a convenience store clerk in L.A., happens across the only recorded copy of a recently deceased rock star's magnum opus (shades of Kurt Cobain?). He decides to cash in on this windfall, but due to a bizarre set of coincidences, combined with his own ineptitude, finds himself running away to Vegas, with a pile of corpses in his wake.
This is a well-written piece of modern pulp. Ridley has created some memorable characters, each of whom is given just enough of a history for the reader to empathize with their plights. And, truth be told, in the space of three pages, Ridley creates the most grotesquely funny suicide scene I can remember reading. While some may deride the cinematic feel to the presentation (short chapters, quick cuts between scenes, vivid use of imagery), it works to the narrative's strength. Ridley presents us with characters raised on exactly the type of pop culture EVERYBODY SMOKES is itself a part of. Why shouldn't the writing style have the same goal?
But EVERYBODY SMOKES, as enjoyable as it is, can't hold its head up all the way to the end. There are too many intertwining threads to be wrapped up in a neat little package. The ending feels rushed, and while it may work on the movie screen, a novel is supposed to be capable of more depth than is on view here. The final outcome is, if not disappointing, than disjointed. I don't mean to imply that happy endings are better. But EVERYBODY SMOKES, after setting up Paris so well, gives the reader a resolution that feels unsatisfying, incomplete. There is the introduction of several new characters towards the end that seem to exist for no useful purpose. And Paris' actions at the end are completely at odds with what happened before, and not believeable after all we've been told.
EVERYBODY SMOKES IN HELL is definitely worth reading. It holds your attention from the first page to the last. It is often so good, you wish it were better as a whole.
WOGY
I am a big fan of crime novels and this is by far one of the best I've read in recent years. Ridley takes a character that was briefly in one of his previous novels, "Love Is A Racket", and builds a compelling story around him. His description of LA is dead-on accurate and, as a resident of the area myself, you can tell by his frank discourse of the good and the bad that he has spent a lot of time here.
The most amazing part of the book though is his dialog and his characterizations. His dialog is spot-on, using modern slang as well as anyone out there. Think a Tarantino film in written form, nothing seems forced and everything is used for the purpose of advancing plot or giving us insight into the minds of the main characters. His characters also feel very three dimensional, not just some cookie cutter cutouts of real people. Ridley also balances the humor in the book with the violence and the suspense quite well.
The only complaint I would have with the book is its brevity, but that doesn't diminish from the book's brilliance nor its enjoyableness. Actually, its short length encouraged me to re-read the book again a couple months after I finished it initially. This book will suck you in and you'll be sorry when you're spit out again at the end. I give it my highest recommendation. A great summer read.
Perdana
Everyday some new piece of crime fiction comes out that's almost indistinguishable from novels already sitting on bookstore shelves. It seems like a lot of the time, mysteries and suspense are written for the lowest common denominator - easy language, a plot that's just engaging enough to keep a reader moving, a few stereotypical characters that readers feel comfortable with, etc. Ridley's Everybody Smokes In Hell, however, provides a refreshing voice in crime fiction.
The plot isn't much to write home about. Down and out youth in L.A. stumbles into a bad situation and finds himself on the run from all kinds of nasty folks. The way this plot is executed is amazing. The characters Ridley comes up with are unique and colorful, each with unique motivations subtly sketched by the author. Dialogue is fresh and crisp, presented the way people talk, not just an author's bland translation. Action is quick and descriptions show no restraint. Often funny, sometimes heartbreaking, the story is an exceptional one. Fiction's lucky to have an author like Ridley. It's a reminder that there's more than cookie-cutter mysteries out there.