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Mystery and Suspense
Author: Ronald Arbuthnott Knox
ISBN: 0486250326
Subcategory: Mystery
Pages 314 pages
Publisher Dover Pubns (February 1, 1986)
Language English
Category: Mystery and Suspense
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 588
ePUB size: 1737 kb
FB2 size: 1529 kb
DJVU size: 1686 kb
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eBook Double Cross Purposes download

by Ronald Arbuthnott Knox


Ronald Arbuthnott Knox (17 February 1888 – 24 August 1957) was an English Catholic priest, theologian and author of detective stories. He was also a writer and a regular broadcaster for BBC Radio.

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox (17 February 1888 – 24 August 1957) was an English Catholic priest, theologian and author of detective stories. Ronald Knox was born into an Anglican family in Kibworth, Leicestershire, England. His strongly evangelical father was Edmund Arbuthnott Knox, who later became the Bishop of Manchester, and was a descendant of John Arbuthnott, 8th Viscount of Arbuthnott.

Double Cross Purposes book. Monsignor Ronald Arbuthnott Knox was a Roman Catholic priest, theologian, author of detective stories, as well as a writer and a regular broadcaster for BBC Radio. From the start, it seems an unholy alliance  . Knox had attended Eton College and won several scholarships at Balliol College, Oxford.

Double Cross Purposes. Book in the Miles Bredon Series). Select Format: Paperback.

com's Ronald Arbuthnott Knox Page and shop for all Ronald Arbuthnott Knox books. Books by Ronald Arbuthnott Knox. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Ronald Arbuthnott Knox.

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox (17 February 1888 – 24 August 1957) was an English priest and theologian. Knox wrote many books of essays and novels. He was ordained an Anglican priest in 1912 and was appointed chaplain of Trinity College, Oxford, but he left in 1917 upon his conversion to Catholicism. In 1918 he was ordained a Catholic priest. Knox wrote many books of essays and novels

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox. 17 February 1888 - 24 August 1957. An English priest, theologian and author of detective stories.

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox. The Belief of Catholics. The footsteps at the lock.

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox was born in Leicestershire, England into an Anglican family (his father was Edmund Arbuthnott Knox who became bishop of Manchester), and was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford. In 1910, he became a fellow of Trinity College, Oxford

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox was born in Leicestershire, England into an Anglican family (his father was Edmund Arbuthnott Knox who became bishop of Manchester), and was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford. In 1910, he became a fellow of Trinity College, Oxford. He was ordained as an Anglican priest in 1912, and was appointed chaplain of Trinity, but left in 1917 when he was received as a Roman Catholic. He explained his spiritual journey in two privately printed books, "Apologia" (1917), and "A Spiritual Aeneid" (1918)

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox was born in Knibworth, Leicestershire, the fourth son of Ellen Penelope French and the Reverend Edmund Arbuthnott Knox, later bishop of Mancester. Ronald's mother died when he was four year old. In 1895 Edmud Knox married Ethel Newton, twenty years his junior.

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox was born in Knibworth, Leicestershire, the fourth son of Ellen Penelope French and the Reverend Edmund Arbuthnott Knox, later bishop of Mancester. Ronald's brother Wilfred become later a theologian; another brother, . In 1900 Knox entered Eton.

by Ronald Arbuthnott Knox. Series: Miles Bredon (book 5). Members. No current Talk conversations about this book.

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox (1888-1957) was a British cleric. He was born in Knibworth, Leicestershire, the son of the Bishop of Manchester, and was the brother of the writer EV Knox. He was educated at Eton and Oxford, and worked in Military Intelligence during WW1. He was ordained into the Anglican church in 1911 and converted to Roman Catholicism in 1917, being re-ordained as a Catholic priest soon after. Knox achieved many academic prizes and honours. He lectured and acted as Catholic chaplain to Oxford University until 1939, when he retired to translate the Bible

No markings. Binding is tight, covers and spine fully intact. All edges are clean. Very clean, crisp, and tight copy. Not Ex-Library. All books offered from DSB are stocked at our store in Fayetteville, AR. Save on shipping by ordering multiple titles. 314pp. Softcover Fine Condition Size: 6" x 9" English Text
Agamaginn
The Highlands of Scotland are famous for Prince Charlie's fabulous treasure. According to legend, the booty is snugly interred on the Isle of Erran, and a ciphered map forgotten in an dank corner of Dreams Castle might just pinpoint the precise location.

The Honourable Vernon Lethaby is a flamboyant, headline-seeking exhibitionist -- young, handsome, with extravagant tastes and an allowance that barely covers his racing debts. Joe "Digger" Henderson is a man of a quieter turn. Among his more considerable abilities, the middle-aged Canadian adventurer, former rum-runner and suspected train robber, boasts a remarkable affinity for digging.

The two set out in a most flamboyant way to discover the treasure. But Sir Charles, owner of the Isle of Erran and lord of Dreams Castle, suspects both Lethaby and Henderson of fraud. And Lethaby has suspicions about the integrity of Henderson

Thus enters the Indescribable Insurance Company who underwrites the success of the whole mess. Naturally, the Indescribable sends along a detective to protect its interests. But murder happens anyway, and the treasure, once found, disappears quickly.

Here enters the classic mystery from Britain's golden age. The story is just a delightful mix of gradually unfolding clues, discussion of the ways those clues point, and wonderful 1930s atmosphere, language, and cultural norms (yes, they do treat women and ladies differently).

Warning: this is not for the modern reader, per se. It was written in 1937, and the language back then was much more complex (and Ronald Knox's language was a bit thicker than the average for its time). It's also much more cerebral a story than modern day stuff. However, if you like the novels from the golden age of mystery-writing, you will like this book.
Stan
I received a very nice copy of this hard-to-find book from ThisThatnThat, Albany NY on Mon. July 13th, which I had ordered on Fri. July 3rd.
DrayLOVE
This book was written in 1937 by an Englishman and it tells. Who, in this day and age, has heard of a muniment room? And what is froison? I was lucky, my dictionary carried both words but I do not see the need for their use, and there are other words as well. However, words aside the story was written poorly, I did not catch on to the way husband and wife talked to each other at first, I actually thought they were fighting instead of playing. It got worse. Milo Bredon reviewed the events as they unfolded, even relating them to his wife with his interpretation of them included only to have no solution, no rational reason given until the conclusion. Here the author, I think trying to pretend he did not throw a curve at the reader, quoted earlier pages as footnotes. Upon tracing down these links I did not see the connection between the page given and the different story Milo came up with in his concluding summary. In fact, reading the quoted pages I continued to see his false conclusions except in his summary he now says that at the place quoted he did have clues to his final statements, he knew them then despite his protestations on those pages, or nearby pages as to his lack of understanding.
I like to try to beat the protagonist of any detective thriller or mystery to the punch, determining who the culprit is. I failed in this book but I did come to the correct solution of the murder very early and I could not understand why the book's characters did not even propose the correct answer in all their surmises. Of course they lack all the books between 1937 and now, when I read it, of similar problems occurring and solved. This type of problem is seldom given in modern mysteries for that reason, familiarity breeds contempt.
The writing is not bad, I imagine that if Knox has written many other books, and the reader has read a few of them, the succeeding novels are old friends and the twists and turns in the book are more understandable. With this thought in mind I would say that reading this book and any others in the series, which seems probable given the characters described, becomes pleasurable.
Forey
Ronald Knox was the same man who singlehandedly translated the Bible, was a brilliant Oxford classicist, and worked in Army Intelligence in WWI. So you know that his detective stories--- he was a founding member of the Detection Club, along with Christie, Sayers, Chesterton, and other greats--- would be polished and literate.

Even with my love for Knox's work-- his "Imitation" is beautifully readable-- I found myself bogging down a little with the description of the Scottish highland countryside at the beginning. But once the scene was set, the story went forward very nicely. I was surprised a little bit at the flow of some elements-- some things happened early enough that I wondered how the pacing would be sustained. I was expecting to read a treasure-hunting puzzle, but instead, found myself enjoying a mystery where no one's being totally honest with each other, and no one knows exactly what's going on, and watching the unraveling of their secrets. Although I'm of the opinion that Knox broke his own Rule #8 at one point, I forgave him because it was a pleasure to see how everything unpacked at the end.