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eBook Sustainable Ethanol: Biofuels, Biorefineries, Cellulosic Biomass, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and Sustainable Farming for Energy Independence download
Moneymaking
Author: Adrian Goettemoeller,Jeffrey Goettemoeller
ISBN: 0978629302
Subcategory: Industries
Pages 196 pages
Publisher Prairie Oak Publishing (September 25, 2007)
Language English
Category: Moneymaking
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 351
ePUB size: 1347 kb
FB2 size: 1728 kb
DJVU size: 1466 kb
Other formats: lit mobi txt lrf

eBook Sustainable Ethanol: Biofuels, Biorefineries, Cellulosic Biomass, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and Sustainable Farming for Energy Independence download

by Adrian Goettemoeller,Jeffrey Goettemoeller


Jeffrey Goettemoeller and Adrian Goettemoeller argue in this technical but readable book that ethanol production can be made energy efficient and sustainable

Jeffrey Goettemoeller and Adrian Goettemoeller argue in this technical but readable book that ethanol production can be made energy efficient and sustainable. They counter the cropland for food argument by noting that only the carbohydrate component of the corn kernel is used to produce ethanol, adding that too much corn is now grown for food in America to the detriment of farmers elsewhere who cannot compete in the marketplace with cheap American corn. Consequently, our abundance puts small foreign farmers out of business and ironically creates food shortages

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book by Jeffrey Goettemoeller. Sustainable Ethanol : Biofuels, Biorefineries, Cellulosic Biomass, Flex-fuel Vehicles, and Sustainable Farming for Energy Independence. by Jeffrey Goettemoeller and Adrian Goettemoeller.

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Goettemoeller and A. Goettemoeller, The history of vegetable oil based diesel fuels, in The Biodiesel Handbook, G. Knothe, E. chapter 2, 2007. View at Google Scholar. J. Goettemoeller and A. Goettemoeller, Sustainable Ethanol: Biofuels, Biorefineries, Cellulosic Biomass, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and Sustainable Farming for Energy Independence, Prairie Oak Publishing, Maryville, Mo, USA, 2007.

Goettemoeller A. Sustainable ethanol: biofuels, biorefineries, cellulosic bio-mass, flex-fuel vehicles, and sustainable farming for energy independence. Maryville Missouri: Praire Oak Publishing; 2007. Renewable energy explained Retrieved from. Eia. Renewable energy explained; October 2010.

Sustainable ethanol: biofuels, biorefineries, cellulosic biomass, flex-fuel vehicles, and sustainable farming for energy independence. In prairie oak publishing, maryville, missouri. Retrieved 16 march 2014, from: ftp://209. Pdf Rosegrant, M. (2008). Biofuels and grain prices: impacts and policy responses.

Prairie Oak Publishing, Maryville, Missouri. Singh, . and Jain, . Prairie Oak Publishing, Maryville, Missouri. p. 42. ISBN 978-786293-0-4. gov/fuels/ethanol production. "Biofuels: The Promise and the Risks, in World Development Report 2008" (PDF). 2005 Public Law 109-58. 2009 Corn Ethanol as Energy.

Goettemoeller J GA (ed) (2007) Sustainable Ethanol: Biofuels, Biorefineries, Cellulosic Biomass, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and Sustainable Farming for Energy Independence. Prairie Oak Publishing, Maryville, MissouriGoogle Scholar

Goettemoeller J GA (ed) (2007) Sustainable Ethanol: Biofuels, Biorefineries, Cellulosic Biomass, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and Sustainable Farming for Energy Independence. Prairie Oak Publishing, Maryville, MissouriGoogle Scholar. 2. Balat M, Balat H (2009) Recent trends in global production and utilization of bio-ethanol fuel. Appl Energ 86(11):2273–2282CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Goettemoeller, Jeffrey; Adrian Goettemoeller (2007). Sustainable Ethanol: Biofuels, Biorefineries, Cellulosic Biomass, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and Sustainable Farming for Energy Independence. pp. BusinessWeek Online:26-26. 2008 Cellulosic Ethanol Booms Despite Unproven Business Models. Nature Biotechnology 26(1):8-9.

Sustainable Ethanol goes beyond the headlines, uncovering the benefits and limitations of North America's fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol production and use are becoming more efficient and less reliant on fossil fuel inputs. Learn about the technologies making ethanol make sense for our environment, economy, and security. Discover how the end of cheap oil is providing an opening for biofuels; how some cars get better fuel economy on 10% ethanol compared to ethanol-free gasoline; how the next generation of flex-fuel and hybrid electric vehicles could be optimized to get much better fuel economy on ethanol; how North America can produce significant quantities of biofuels without damaging our food production capacity; how sustainable farming methods are reducing ethanol's reliance on fossil fuels; and how cellulosic ethanol can be made from waste materials and soil-restoring perennial crops.
Erthai
This book is truly a crash course on the subject. The Goettemoeller brothers present a brief but very comprehensive account of the ethanol evolution, beginning with a concise history of the oil and ethanol industries, through farm subsidies, the economics, environmental impact, greenhouse gases, ethanol and world hunger, all the flex-fuel vehicles available (E10, E85, E100 and the Brazilian full flex-fuel vehicles), improving fuel efficiency, ethanol production from several crops, the energy balance, to close with a discussion about a key question, is ethanol renewable? All of it in just less than 200 pages, not surprisingly the book reads fast, the facts are presented almost like bullets, with web addresses and references for easy follow-up.

The successful Brazilian experience is also presented, explaining the 30 year process that led to this country's leadership in farming productivity, ethanol fuel production and distribution, and the development and manufacturing of full flex-fuel vehicles, with the same sales price as E-10 cars. And all of these achievements without government subsidies, or sacrificing food production, and even with a sharp increase in grain and food exports thanks to China's voracious appetite for commodities. The authors also debunk the deforestation myth. Sugar cane is produced mainly in São Paulo state, some 2,500 Km away from the Amazon forest, in areas previously used for farming, and the entire state's area is just 3% of Brazil's territory. Whenever possible, a comparison with the U.S experience is presented, and key differences are highlighted, such as Brazil's superior productivity rates in farming sugar cane.

My only disappointment with the book is that the Brazilian case is not presented with the same depth as the American experience; instead, information about Brazil is spread throughout the book in very short paragraphs, and based mainly on interviews with Brazilian English-speaking executives. It seems the language barrier hindered a deeper coverage of this successful story. That's why I did not give the book the five stars. And incidentally, the book does not mention the fact that today the price of hydrated ethanol (Brazil's biofuel) is around 30% cheaper than standard gasoline, more than enough to fully compensate for the lower energy content in ethanol, and thanks to the fully flexible fuel technology, auto users are free to choose the proportion of each fuel depending on market prices. Tipically, between sugar cane harvest seasons, you simply go back to gasoline.

As oil approaches US$ 120 per barrel, and as the oil industry and OPEC countries are ironically echoing the concerns of some international bureaucrats and environmental groups (yes, the same supporting the Global Warming cause!) regarding the alleged responsibility of ethanol production for the recent increases in food prices, I think this is a book you definitively should read before taking sides on the food versus biofuels controversy.

The problem is complex; there are several causes, and agricultural subsidies in rich countries are chief among them, in particular when highly subsidized corn crops for ethanol production became more profitable than producing other cash crops for food. This subject is out of the scope of the book, but if you are interested on this controversy, read the masterpiece article in the Economist's April 17th 2008 issue, entitled "The Silent Tsunami". That will be a good starting point to understand the real causes and the paradoxes behind world hunger and poverty.

Also, the latest two books from Joseph E. Stiglitz have some chapters explaining how agricultural subsidies in the U.S. and several European countries, together with trade barriers, are among the real culprits for the poorest developing countries not being able to produce what they eat, and how many other countries are being barred from entering the "free" global market and developed by themselves. Just read Making Globalization Work and Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development. At least inform yourself properly and get the facts right before taking sides on this new global controversy. Happy 2008 Earth's Day!
Mazuzahn
This is a book that is helpful for people of all educational levels to begin to understand not only Ethanol, but the who Biofuels industry.

The conciseness of the information into what can be considered bullet points delivers the maximum information in the least space possible. This leaves no room for agenda driven diatribes present in most books today. In addition, the book provides an abundance of cited sources that can be used by the reader for additional research and, thus, does not choke the book with needless facts and information.

The best part is that, for us who think Ethanol is only one piece in the complete Biofuels puzzle, much of the information can be applied to other Biofuels like methanol and butanol.

For me this book is not only a primer, but a reference source for the future.
Ironfire
A good introdution to the subject of ethanol fuel,well worth reading,with some valuable information not in other books on ethanol.Not enough detail though for people who prefer a more hands on approach and would like to make their own fuel and convert their vehicle to run on ethanol.
Dagdalas
This is very informative on parameters concerning ethanol mechanics, costs subsidies etc., but it doesn't sustain it's promotional agenda. It may be significant that the cover picture, under the title, shows a highway empty of any vehicles. There are no cars, horses or humans. The history points out that alcohol was used to power vehicles before gasoline. The book, written in 2005, is out of date as estimates of oil and gas reserves have already proven wrong. The effect on world hunger is anti-intuitive. Maybe more data is available now.

There's no mention of ethanol effect of world oil prices, only an unconvincing claim that only low grade starch is used for fuel. The real agenda shows up in the farming chapter saying that corn farmers can't survive with the present price of food. World food inflation has been rather severe since the book was written. The powerful farm lobby can't be ignored, logic or no. Why don't we buy the more cost efficient Brazilian ethanol? Farm lobbies campaign for protection giving the lie to environmentalism as a reason for ethanol.

I hadn't realized that about 4 gallons of water is used for every gallon of ethanol produced. I would expect that to become a target of conservationists during the California drought, ahead of the less popular, but more productive, generation of gas and oil via fracking.

Technology of ethanol from waste products, grasses and low cost cellular biomass is still in the early research stage, appearing to be more wishful thinking than reality based. There is analysis of various kinds of efficient ethanol engines, all imports. Direct injection retrofitting appears to be a small market. There's discussion of competing hydrogen and fuel cell technology, none on electric vehicles.

I found the energy balance accounting to be obtuse, confusing solar energy input with petroleum input energy. Cost benefits accounting is greatly obfuscated by farm subsidies and tax incentives. Discussion on subsidies of ethanol oil and gas confuses research with production.