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eBook Market Power and the Economy: Industrial, Corporate, Governmental, and Political Aspects (Recent Economic Thought) download
Moneymaking
Author: Wallace C. Peterson
ISBN: 089838267X
Subcategory: Economics
Pages 176 pages
Publisher Springer; 1988 edition (August 31, 1988)
Language English
Category: Moneymaking
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 917
ePUB size: 1792 kb
FB2 size: 1403 kb
DJVU size: 1969 kb
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eBook Market Power and the Economy: Industrial, Corporate, Governmental, and Political Aspects (Recent Economic Thought) download

by Wallace C. Peterson


Corporate Power and Economic Performance. Concluding Observations. Bibliographic Information. Market Power and the Economy.

Corporate Power and Economic Performance. National Economic Management and the Supranational Economy. Economic Power and the Political Process. Recent Economic Thought.

Recent Economic Thought. All modern textbooks are built around Smithian ideas about markets and the way the "invisible hand" works through competition for society's better ment. Livre 15. Wallace C. Peterson6 décembre 2012. As John Kenneth Galbraith as tutely observes: a dominant fact in economic life is the desire of people everywhere and in all circumstances to get control over their personal lives and their incomes-to escape from the "tyranny of the market.

Book Overview as- tutely observes: a dominant fact in economic life is the desire of people.

A situation in economics that is little short of scandalous is the almost total neglect by mainstream economics of the importance of power in economic affairs. 6 Economic Power and the Political Process. 7 Concluding Observations. 2 Economic Power: History and Institutions. 3 The Concentration of Economic Power. 4 Corporate Power and Economic Performance. 5 National Economic Management and the Supranational Economy.

What can government do to enhance social and economic well being? Nothing, says Murray N. Rothbard. Power and Market contains the proof

What can government do to enhance social and economic well being? Nothing, says Murray N. Power and Market contains the proof. It will inoculate the reader against even the slightest temptation to invoke the state as a solution to any social or economic problem. What can government do to enhance social and economic well being? Nothing, says Murray N. It is the ultimate manual for completely de-mystifying the myth of the state.

The US and the UK were the first to change tack under Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher but Europe eventually . The debt crisis of 2007 and 2008 is undoubtedly as important a turning point in economic and political thought as was the stagflationary episode of the 1970s.

The US and the UK were the first to change tack under Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher but Europe eventually shifted policy direction after growing concern about its sluggish growth; Eurosclerosis as it was known. We are still working though its effects. But a number of issues have arisen; debt and the finance sector should play a more important role in macro-economic modelling. Debt is not just a zero sum game ; finance is not just a channel but can have seriously destabilising effects.

The Political Economy Reader: Markets as Institutions. Lindblom supports this argument of examining the advantaged power of business. Staff exists which can be readily diverted to political issues. In a system of centralized planning, all decisions regarding the production and dispersion of good and services (all things economic) would be left up to a centralized authority. Lindblom argues that interests that rival big business to not have the organizational capacity to effectively purse their political interests. Lastly, building on the previous point, business interests are already closely tied to governmental leadership.

Sidgwick's studies in political economy carried this ethical perspective into the economic realm, though the major . Their relevance extends out to students of economic history, philosophy, and the history of ideas in the eighteenth century, as well as to all those involved in the study of Adam Smith.

Sidgwick's studies in political economy carried this ethical perspective into the economic realm, though the major impact came via his influence on A. C. Pigou, whose welfare analysis was very much a restatement of the Sidgwickian view, but undertaken with Marshallian analytical underpinnings.

The history of economic thought deals with different thinkers and theories in the subject that became political economy and economics, from the ancient world to the present day in the 21st Century

The history of economic thought deals with different thinkers and theories in the subject that became political economy and economics, from the ancient world to the present day in the 21st Century. This field encompasses many disparate schools of economic thought. Ancient Greek writers such as the philosopher Aristotle examined ideas about the art of wealth acquisition, and questioned whether property is best left in private or public hands.

A situation in economics that is little short of scandalous is the almost total neglect by mainstream economics of the importance of power in economic affairs. Power in this context means the ability to bend market forces in one's favor, influencing and shaping key economic variables such as prices, wages, and other income determinants. As John Kenneth Galbraith as­ tutely observes: a dominant fact in economic life is the desire of people everywhere and in all circumstances to get control over their personal lives and their incomes-to escape from the "tyranny of the market. " Power is the means to this end. Ever since Adam Smith, economists have been fascinated by and lavish in their praise for the workings of the market. All modern textbooks are built around Smithian ideas about markets and the way the "invisible hand" works through competition for society's better­ ment. Yet one can search nearly in vain through leading texts, under­ graduate and graduate alike, for any reference to market or economic power. This is the situation in spite of the fact that the drive for power, the urge to get control over one's income, permeates the economy as much as does competition. This is a scandal! For a discipline that claims for itself the mantle of a science-one which wants to be accorded the same respect given the natural sciences-it is almost incomprehensible that it should ignore a major force at work in the real economic world.