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Memoris and Biographies
Author: Philip Bashe,Mel Blanc
ISBN: 0446512443
Pages 275 pages
Publisher Grand Central Pub; First Edition edition (August 1, 1988)
Language English
Category: Memoris and Biographies
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 921
ePUB size: 1660 kb
FB2 size: 1587 kb
DJVU size: 1931 kb
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eBook That's Not All Folks download

by Philip Bashe,Mel Blanc


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. That's Not All Folks! Paperback – November 1, 1989. by. Mel Blanc (Author).

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The legendary cartoon and radio voice man offers a behind-the-scenes chronicle of his many-voiced career. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Mel Blanc (Author), Philip Bashe (Author).

That's Not All Folks Hardcover – August 1, 1988. Mel Blanc started at the bottom, looking for work at local radio stations and landing a few jobs here and there until Warner Brothers hired him for some gigs providing voices to cartoons.

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Blanc Communications Corporation: The Little Company with a Long History Blanc Communications Corporation.

Blanc's such a gentleman that he spells his expletives like so: F K. Such manners charm, but when they mean not saying a bad word about anyone, they also bore. As Blanc tells it, his life-from boyhood in Oregon to radio emceeing to doing cartoon voices for Disney and Warner Brothers to joining Jack Benny's troupe-has been spent shaking hands with one saint or genius after another. Even when he took Woody Woodpecker inventor Walter Lantz to court over a dispute as to who owned Woody's voice, Blanc ""considered Lantz a friend; still do, in fact

In December 1936, Mel Blanc joined Leon Schlesinger Productions, which was producing theatrical cartoon shorts for Warner Bros. That's Not All, Folks!, 1988, by Mel Blanc and Philip Bashe.

In December 1936, Mel Blanc joined Leon Schlesinger Productions, which was producing theatrical cartoon shorts for Warner Bros. After sound man Treg Brown was put in charge of cartoon voices, and Carl Stalling became music director, Brown introduced Blanc to animation directors Tex Avery, Bob Clampett, Friz Freleng, and Frank Tashlin, who loved his voices. Warner Books, ISBN 0-446-39089-5 (softcover), ISBN 0-446-51244-3 (hardcover).

Showing 20 distinct works.

Philip Bashe’s most popular book is That's Not All Folks: My Life in the Golden Age of Cartoons. Showing 20 distinct works. That's Not All Folks: My Life in the Golden Age of Cartoons and Radio by. Mel Blanc, Philip Bashe.

Mel Blanc & Philip Bashe. Bibliographic Details. Title: That's Not all Folks!

Mel Blanc & Philip Bashe. ISBN 10: 0446512443, ISBN 13: 9780446512442. Published by Warner Books, New York, 1988. Condition: As New Hardcover. Title: That's Not all Folks! My Life in the Golden. Publisher: Warner Books, New York. Publication Date: 1988.

with this book, "That's NOT All Folks!", we read the Mel Blanc story from his birth to 1988 (he passed away in 1989). Though the man left us in 1989, Mel Blanc will forever live on in the characters he voiced

with this book, "That's NOT All Folks!", we read the Mel Blanc story from his birth to 1988 (he passed away in 1989). we're informed of how he was raised in a melting pot and he started to mimick different dialects. he indirectly states that he's not a dialectition (one who specializes in dialects) because most of his dialects have. Though the man left us in 1989, Mel Blanc will forever live on in the characters he voiced. This book provides biographical information as well as a behind-the-scenes look at the activities of the Warner Brothers studio. Readers will learn how the individual voices were created and will even see photos of Mel "portraying" the character as he talks.

Mel Blanc with his various Looney Tunes and Hanna-Barbera characters. . Mel Blanc, Philip Bashe (1988), That's Not All Folks, Warner Books. Early photo of Mel Blanc's family; Mel is on the bottom left. A young Mel performing.

The legendary cartoon and radio voice man offers a behind-the-scenes chronicle of his many-voiced career, detailing his creation of world-famous voices and his work with the best-loved cartoon characters and radio personalities
Coiriel
One of my favorite pieces which I have on my wall is a color photo Mel Blanc used to send out to fans with his autograph, showing him sitting at his desk, with the characters he gave voice to perched on his shoulder and in pockets and on the desktop in front of him -- Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Sylvester, Tweety, Foghorn Leghorn, and others.

When he died a few years ago, he was buried under a stone which read "That's All Folks!" but luckily, among his many works, he left this delightful 1988 autobiography which I dscovered on Amazon.com, subtitled "My life in the Golden Age of cartoons and radio."

Mel Blanc started at the bottom, looking for work at local radio stations and landing a few jobs here and there until Warner Brothers hired him for some gigs providing voices to cartoons.

He became the voice first of the redesigned Porky Pig, Bugs Bunny who went through a redesign of his own, Elmer Fudd, who wasn't as bright as Porky Pig but at least could be an adversary for Bugs unlike Porky who was too sweet a guy, and Daffy Duck, a perfect opponent for Bugs, both intelligent and pugnacious. The greatest Bugs opponent was a late-comer, Yosemite Sam, all violence and animosity.

Once he was well on his way as Warners' Man of a Thousand Voices, he asked for a raise, which his cheap employer wasn't likely to go for, or for a credit. A credit in a cartoon? But at least it didn't cost anything so Blanc got his credit and people noticed. He started getting hired for radio and later TV shows. He started out doing bits on Jack Benny's show and wound up on many more shows, including the Abbott and Costello Show, and headlined his own radio show briefly. One of the best bits ever on Benny's program was the "Si-Si" routine in which Mel is a Mexican wearing a sombrero (Are you going to New York?" Si. Are you takling Flight 18? Si. Si? Si.....and so on.) (You can find it on YouTube. It's hysterical. Blanc keeps a straight face and Benny loses it everytime.)

Having recently read Lou Costello's daughter's biography of her dad, it was interesting to read Blanc's comments about how the two rarely spoke to each other but were so attuned to their specialty and so professional they could get on stage or before a camera and start cooking like they were best buds.

Blanc's autobiography covers his life, talking about he liked to plays with dialects and voices as a kid. Doing a crazy laugh in an empty school hallway whose acoustics he admired got him a visit to the principal and many years later became Woody Woodpecker's trademark laugh.

Blanc regretted the loss of quality with the full animation technique in the 1960's when the number of drawings for a cartoon were reduced in a time- and-cost-saving measure. Movements became jerkier, less natural, but he enthusiastically did his best for every one of the jobs he was hired for.

The book continues through his life, up and through the car accident in 1960 that left him in a body cast with almost every bone in his body broken. When his doctor, after many days of coma, tried to rouse him, he had a light bulb moment and asked, "How are you, Bugs Bunny?" Blanc replied as Bugs, "I'm fine, doc, how're you?"

Later, from his hospital bed, Blanc would do his lines as Barney Rubble for the hit Flintsones TV show as his co-star voice actors stood alongside.

This is an excellent book. You gotta love a book that has back cover testimonials from Vincent Price, Lucille Ball, Kirk Douglas, Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Elmer Fudd, and Daffy Duck.
Jusari
I just adored this book! One of my favorite anecdotes was the teacher who, because Mel was playing around with voices instead of taking his studies seriously, declared that he'd never amount to anything. I sure hope that teacher saw that his success far exceeded hers. And bravo to his parents for encouraging him to follow his dreams. I'm glad I read this book in 2016 instead of when it first came out because I was able to go to youtube and pull up many of the shows and skits he wrote about so I could see them for myself.
Steelraven
It is a heart warming to share the life of this remarkable man. He does not pull punches but he is also kind and generous to so many people he met across the breadth of American entertainment. He remembered how difficult it was to become a rare voice talent and gifted comedian. He recognized the people who traveled that difficult road with him. His tribute to Jack Benny fits nicely with the testimony given by the men and women who were all Benny fans.
He also gives rare insight into the difficult world for which he is most known: A voice artist for decades of cartoons. Those hundreds of WB cartoons never listed more than a handful of names. But really hundreds of people worked on each one. As Mel said, instead of giving him a raise they put his name in that small list who got screen credit. That credit was worth ten times his salary because it finally opened the doors that had been closed to him.
The book was written while he was still alive. He was full of hope and energy even after so many decades. He never let anything
stop him. What a rare person he was.
Dogrel
This is the very interesting life of Mel Blanc who was the voice of many cartoons among them Bugs Bunny Daffy Duck Woody Woodpecker exspecially the laugh Yosemite Sam Porky Pig Syvester and Tweety Elmer Fudd and later Barney Rubble. He also sang novelty songs but he is best known as the the man of 1000 voices. If youve heard of theese chachors-and most of us have -get this book. It should interest you.
Globus
If you love cartoons, especially Looney Toons, read this book. Gentleman Mel!
Vital Beast
What a life he had.
Wohald
Let's face it, I love the Looney Tunes cartoons... you should know that going into this review. Having said that (and being a great admirer of Mel Blanc's talent) I doubt I'd want to read this book a second time. I read and re-read many of my books, enjoying their special world again.

Mel could have used a good editor when he put this semi-autobiography together. I found myself skipping ahead many times when the narrative slowed down and dragged; he does (did) love to drop names, too!

All in all, I rated this a "4" since I did enjoy reading his memories of Portland, Oregon and later the entertainment industry. Mel was part of the growth of classic radio shows and then film cartoons, with some great insights and stories to share. I love to hear his anecdotes about Chuck Jones, Fritz Freleng and other greats... the book would have been better with fewer pages is all I'm saying.

Get this one at the library or at a discounted price is my advice, doc. <cue Looney Tunes closing music>
Very good book