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eBook Isaac Newton (Christian Encounters Series) download
Memoris and Biographies
Author: Mitch Stokes
ISBN: 1595553037
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Pages 192 pages
Publisher Thomas Nelson (March 1, 2010)
Language English
Category: Memoris and Biographies
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 983
ePUB size: 1279 kb
FB2 size: 1995 kb
DJVU size: 1245 kb
Other formats: lit lrf mbr mobi

eBook Isaac Newton (Christian Encounters Series) download

by Mitch Stokes


In this Christian Encounter Series biography, author Mitch Stokes explores the life of Isaac Newton, the man behind the atomic theory. As an inventor, astronomer, physicist, and philosopher, Isaac Newton forever changed the way we see and understand the world

In this Christian Encounter Series biography, author Mitch Stokes explores the life of Isaac Newton, the man behind the atomic theory. As an inventor, astronomer, physicist, and philosopher, Isaac Newton forever changed the way we see and understand the world. At one point, he was the world’s leading authority in mathematics, optics, and alchemy. And surprisingly he wrote more about faith and religion than on all of these subjects combined. But his single-minded focus on knowledge and discovery was a great detriment to his health.

Mitch Stokes, the author of Christian Encounters: Isaac Newton, is a Fellow of Philosophy at New St. Andrews College in Moscow, Idaho. After receiving his P. in philosophy from Notre Dame under the direction of Alvin Plantinga and Peter van Inwagen, Stokes also earned an . in religion from Yale under the direction of Nicholas Wolterstorff. This item: Isaac Newton (Christian Encounters Series). Customers who viewed this item also viewed.

Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes (April 11, 1867 – December 18, 1944) was an American architect. His early architectural career was in partnership with John Mead Howells. Andrews . Mitch Stokes was able to bring his subject of Isaac Newton to life

Mitch Stokes, the author of Christian Encounters: Isaac Newton, is a Fellow of Philosophy at New St. Mitch Stokes was able to bring his subject of Isaac Newton to life. What could have been a dry book about this man was engaging and interesting and piqued my interest in Newton and his work. Highly recommend reading this book.

Isaac Newton - Mitch Stokes. Christian encounters. For information, please e-mail on. Isaac Newton, by Mitch Stokes. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. ).

Christian Encounters, a series of biographies from Thomas Nelson Publishers, highlights important lives from all ages and areas of the Church. Some are familiar faces. Others are unexpected guests.

In this Christian Encounter Series biography, author Mitch Stokes explores the life of Isaac Newton, the man behind the atomic theory. At one point, he was the world's leading authority in mathematics, optics, and alchemy.

Christian Encounters Series - : Isaac Newton Tout savoir sur Christian Encounters Series. Mitch Stokes (Auteur). Christian Encounters, a series of biographies from Thomas Nelson Publishers, highlights important lives from all ages and areas of the Church.

In this Christian Encounter Series biography, author Mitch Stokes explores the life of Isaac Newton, the man behind the atomic theory.

As an inventor, astronomer, physicist, and philosopher, Isaac Newton forever changed the way we see and understand the world. At one point, he was the world’s leading authority in mathematics, optics, and alchemy. And surprisingly he wrote more about faith and religion than on all of these subjects combined. But his single-minded focus on knowledge and discovery was a great detriment to his health. Newton suffered from fits of mania, insomnia, depression, a nervous breakdown, and even mercury poisoning.

Yet from all of his suffering came great gain. Newton saw the scientific world not as a way to refute theology, but as a way to explain it. He believed that all of creation was mandated and set in motion by God and that it was simply waiting to be “discovered” by man. Because of his diligence in both scientific and biblical study, Newton had a tremendous impact on religious thought that is still evident today.

Granijurus
This book was fantastic! Read it. Then read it to your kids! Then give it to a neighbor. Great overview of Newton and his life!
Andromathris
A very good mix of the scientific information as well as his personal life. Also good background data on the history of the era.I learned alot
Maman
Good, quick read and I enjoyed learning about his life and faith.
Warianys
It's very informative and very motivating at the same time, and i didn't let me get any weary!
I recommend this book with 10 stars.
Bloodhammer
Very informative
Malakelv
I am just loving these biographies from the Christian Encounters series! After I finished Saint Patrick, my husband encouraged me to try to review another book from the same series if I could. Lo and behold, the opportunity presented itself, and a short biography titled Isaac Newton was soon on its way to me.

Any of you who know me are probably thinking, "Isaac Newton? She picked a biography of a guy who is all about math and science?" Yes! I know it seems rather crazy, considering how math and science have always been my worst subjects.

However, I thoroughly enjoyed this biography of Newton by Mitch Stokes. Stokes does a great job depicting Newton's life and his scientific studies; he even explains the truth behind the apple falling from the tree (which, incidentally, did not land on Newton's head). But oh friends, did you know that Newton wrote more about theology and religion than all of his other studies? And yet we know so little about these! Stokes included several excerpts from Newton's writings (not just about theology, but about optics, calculus, and other subjects I simply don't understand). One of these excerpts I'd like to share. Newton writes:

To celebrate God for eternity, immensity, omniscience, and omnipotence is indeed very pious and the duty of every creature to do according to capacity, but...the wisest of beings required of us to be celebrated not so much for his essence as for his actions, the creating, preserving, and governing of all things according to his good will and pleasure. The wisdom, power, goodness, and justice which he always exerts in his actions are his glory which he stands so much upon, and is so jealous of...even to the least tittle.

It doesn't matter who you are and whether you agree with Newton's ascertations or not, but that is just beautifully written and expressed. Would that we wrote like that today! I highly recommend this biography; I am so glad my husband pushed me to select and review this book. I respect Newton a great deal more than I ever did, and though I may not appreciate his development of calculus, I am glad God gifted him in so many ways and that Newton pursued the understanding of the world around him.
Ynneig
One of a series of books on leading Christian figures, Christian Encounters: Isaac Newton discusses the philosophy, life and times of this eminent inventor, astronomer, physicist, and philosopher. In addition to exploring Newton's extensive writings on faith, he also shows how Newton used his grasp on theology to explain the scientific world.

Stokes includes fairly extensive quotes from Newton's leading biographers, William Stukeley and Frank Manuel, as well as excerpts from the philosopher's own writing. Of particular interest to me, as a retired librarian, was Stokes' description of the importance of Newton's notebooks, which he kept throughout his life, and which revealed "an almost obsessive organizing tendency" (nowadays such a tendency might, quite likely, be regarded as leanings towards OCD).

Starting with a lively description of Newton's childhood and background, Stokes goes on to explain how he narrowly escaped being forced to follow in his father's footsteps as a gentleman farmer. Instead, albeit grudgingly, he was allowed to take up more academic pursuits at Trinity College in Cambridge. Stokes disputes the claims made by "Freudians and other sensationalists" that sexual frustration was the primary motivator of Newton's intense study and contemplation, stating that "there's little to support it".

Stokes' style, though informed and informative, is never dull and prosaic. Apart from the biography being rooted in academically sound research (as can be seen in the annotations to all 15 chapters), Stokes makes Newton's life and times accessible and interesting to the contemporary reader. He is able to discuss the leading philosophical debates of the day in such terms that even those who know little of philosophy are easily able to understand the gist of his argument. The non-polemical narrative is straightforward and objective, taking into account Newton's own Christian orientation, without assuming that the reader is necessarily of the same persuasion.

Stokes allows his own authorial voice to emerge in such pithy sayings as "Good metaphors can outstrip literal descriptions", before explaining Francis Bacon's metaphor of God having written two books, Scripture and Nature, with the study of either leading to His glorification. Stokes not only refers to the metaphors of others, but also, when the situation suits, constructs his own in order to explain a particular concept. For instance, in partial explanation of the problem that was experienced during Galileo's time in explaining the phenomenon of motion, Stokes urges the reader: "Imagine a movie of an object flying through the air--a cat, perhaps. The more frames per second we have, the more of the cat's moments we capture, the more data we have. But if we wanted information about the cat at a moment in between any two of the frames, we would be forced to guess or approximate based on the frames before and after the missing moment."

Mitch Stokes, the author of Christian Encounters: Isaac Newton, is a Fellow of Philosophy at New St. Andrews College in Moscow, Idaho. After receiving his Ph.D. in philosophy from Notre Dame under the direction of Alvin Plantinga and Peter van Inwagen, Stokes also earned an M.A. in religion from Yale under the direction of Nicholas Wolterstorff. [Reviewer for [...]]