eBook Tin Can Man download
Memoris and Biographies
Author: E. J. Jernigan
ISBN: 1591144248
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Pages 206 pages
Publisher Naval Institute Press; Reissue edition (March 1, 2010)
Language English
Category: Memoris and Biographies
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 101
ePUB size: 1965 kb
FB2 size: 1130 kb
DJVU size: 1888 kb
Other formats: mbr lrf rtf txt

eBook Tin Can Man download

by E. J. Jernigan


He just tells it as it was & this is the 1940s.

He just tells it as it was & this is the 1940s. Luckily, he found the right woman & seems to have settled down. He just tells it as it was & this is the 1940s.

Аудиокнига "Tin Can Man", E. J. Jernigan. Читает Kent Cassella. With its colorful view of what went on below decks, Tin Can Man has made a lasting contribution to World War II literature since its publication in 1993

Аудиокнига "Tin Can Man", E. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. With its colorful view of what went on below decks, Tin Can Man has made a lasting contribution to World War II literature since its publication in 1993.

Tin Can Man. 1 5 Author: . Jernigan Narrator: Kent Cassella

Tin Can Man. Jernigan Narrator: Kent Cassella. E. Jernigan's memoir offers listeners a fascinating glimpse of life as an enlisted man aboard the USS Saufley, one of the most highly decorated destroyers of World War II. It is a rarely told story of the sailors who fought the war from boiler rooms, after-steering spaces, radio shacks, and other gritty places that keep a warship going. For the author, it was a world of strong emotions and quick reactions, where men had to adapt and grow if they were to survive.

Tin Can Man" by E. Jernigan is the personal story of an enlisted man who served aboard the USS Saufley during the war. It provides readers with insights into what it was like to live, work, fight, and die aboard these ships. A superbly written 206-page memoir, "Tin Can Man" is especially informative and recommended reading for military history buffs in general, and academic library 20th Century Naval History reference collections in particular.

Tin Can Man offers the reader a fascinating glimpse of life as an enlisted man in the"Old Navy," and a view of war all too often overlooked in books by generals, admirals, and historians. It was a life of rules, duty, honour, and a highly defined sense of right and wrong. It was a world of strong emotions and quick reactions, where men had to adapt and grow if they were to survive. With its unusual perspective on history and colourful view of men at war, Tin Can Man is an impressive contribution to World War II literature.

With its colorful view of what went on below decks, Tin Can Man has made a lasting contribution to World War II literature since its publication in 1993.

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Written by E. Jernigan, Audiobook narrated by Kent Cassella.

Written by E.

With its colorful view of what went on below decks, the book has made a lasting contribution to World War II literature since first published in 1993.

Jernigan's memoir offers readers a fascinating glimpse of life as an enlisted man aboard the USS Saufley, one of the most highly decorated destroyers of World War II. With its colorful view of what went on below decks, the book has made a lasting contribution to World War II literature since first published in 1993.

Jernigan���Tin�Can�Man . Jernigan's�memoir�offers�listeners�a�fascinating�glimpse�of�life�as�an�enlisted�man�aboard�the�USS�Saufley,�one of�the�most�highly�decorated. destroyers�of�World�War�II. It�is�a�rarely�told�story�of�the�sailors�who�fought�the�war�from boiler�rooms,�after�steering�spaces,�radio�shacks,�and�other�gritty�places�that�keep.

E.J. Jernigan's memoir offers readers a fascinating glimpse of life as an enlisted man aboard the USS Saufley, one of the most highly decorated destroyers of World War II. It is a rarely told story of the sailors who fought the war from boiler rooms, after-steering spaces, radio shacks, and other gritty places that keep a warship going. For the author, it was a world of strong emotions and quick reactions, where men had to adapt and grow if they were to survive.

With its colorful view of what went on below decks, the book has made a lasting contribution to World War II literature since first published in 1993. It appeals to veterans, historians, and naval enthusiasts alike looking for an honest account of what happened.

Truthcliff
I enjoyed the book very much. I'm not a professional reviewer and I purchased the book solely to further experience some of the things that those of the WW2 generation did. I served aboard the USS Noa DD-841 (1970-73) so most of the shipboard terms/nomenclature/situations were familiar. I didn't serve during wartime so I didn't have to worry about GQ sounding daily at odd times. However fresh food (milk, etc) ran out in a week or so when underway, and fresh water was precious, mail was infrequent, and you saw the same faces continually. In wartime you'd have to add the possibility of imminent danger and possibly death for you and if not you, then for your shipmates.
Whitebinder
Love the authors' writing style. He makes me remember the day-to-day activites and the various evolutions of training which occurred while I was in the Navy serving on a DLG which is somewhat akin to a Destroyer. The day to day evolutions have not much changed although the Navy is much more technical now. But the general conversation and activities of the crews are not much changed. Gives me rememberances of sea spray and salty but fresh air, new ports of call and "stunts" of shipmates.
Otiel
Tremendous story about the regular sailor's life on Destroyer duty in World War II. Guaranteed you will like it.
Goldenfang
Fascinating read from a single- (but action packed) tour enlisted sailor's point of view in the WW2 surface navy.
JoJogar
This book mentions my father....I am so happy to read about my dad and the other men on the ships at sea.
Grillador
It was a gift for a man who was in the Navy on a destroyer during the Korean War. He liked it.
Foiuost
I just finished a book: "Tin Can Man". It is a personal history of MM2 (?)(I am not sure what rank he ended up as because he went to see the Captain a couple of times) E.J. Jernigan's time in the U.S. Navy. He joined 2, Dec. 1940. In 370 days WWII, for the U.S., would begin. After boot he became a plank owner of a new battleship; "USS Wisconsin" BB 56. He was a "snipe" because he liked the red stripe that they had on their uniforms. lol. After about a year on the Wisconsin, he was transferred (from the brig) to "USS Saufley" DD 465. He would spend the whole war fighting from the engine room of Saufley. He, his shipmates and his ship earned 16 Battle stars. It is an amazing story that anyone who has served in the Navy would enjoy, especially DD men (like me) and snipes in particular. Anyway, in the last paragraph of the Epilogue of the book he wrote something that I really think hits home what it is like to go to sea/war on a ship. Something that is true for all Navy sailors, to a greater or less degree, across time. Peace or war. This is what he wrote: "Finally, I would like to say some special words about what the word, "shipmate", means to me. Shipmate is an honorable word that is earned, not given. Being called a shipmate is the highest compliment one can earn in this life. Shipmate is a word equal to none in the English language. It is filled with courage, love, hate, duty, honor, and country. It is a bond forged in storms, battles, adversity, and victory, and it is equaled only by man's love for his wife and family. It is formed at sea in a ship with a captain of character who causes a "can-do" spirit to pass down the line: captain to executive officer to junior officers, chiefs, petty officers and crew. Weak links are cut loose and replaced quickly and cleanly without fanfare by a wise captain. We were lucky with Commander Brown. Everything happened like a well-written script, that is, the good ship, the good crew, and a bonding forged so strong it can be broken only by the death of the last shipmate. This bond, this ship, and our great good luck are the reasons we survived and won." I would have loved to serve with this man, but I did serve with men like him. I never realized a snipe could be so eloquent.
for wanting to get away from home. Like many who entered the service, he did so to get away from grinding poverty and to support his family. Don't blame him for getting into scrapes, fights and disastrous liberty ashore. He was a kid, at war. Don't blame him for stiffness in prose; all he knows about writing is what he learned in high school, and, besides, he's entitled to his own style. Don't blame him for writing still another first-person account of the life of an enlisted man in the U. S. Navy during WWII; each such book adds something new. He witnessed the cliff-jumper suicides at Okinawa, for example, and he reveals that even enlisted men knew, at the time of Yamamoto's death, the Japanese Naval Code had been broken. Don't blame the man; blame the book. It's written from memory rather than contemporaneous diary, so anecdotes lack breadth and detail like James J. Fahey's "Pacific War Diary" or insights like Shelly Robinson's "10,000 Miles Aboard the Destroyer Cotten." Also, it amplifies memory with research, but lists no bibliography. Its motivation, I guess, is to write things down so memories wouldn't be lost; to honor friends; and to amuse the author--good enough reasons to spend time with a sailor who served in a death trap of an action station, sixty years later.