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eBook Sovereign Ladies: Sex, Sacrifice, and Power-The Six Reigning Queens of England download
Memoris and Biographies
Author: Maureen Waller
ISBN: 0312386087
Subcategory: Historical
Pages 576 pages
Publisher St. Martin's Griffin; Reprint edition (November 25, 2008)
Language English
Category: Memoris and Biographies
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 654
ePUB size: 1728 kb
FB2 size: 1953 kb
DJVU size: 1713 kb
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eBook Sovereign Ladies: Sex, Sacrifice, and Power-The Six Reigning Queens of England download

by Maureen Waller


Sovereign Ladies book. Each faced personal sacrifices and emotional dilemmas in her pursuit of political power

Sovereign Ladies book. In the bestselling tradition of authors Antonia Fraser and David. Each faced personal sacrifices and emotional dilemmas in her pursuit of political power. This book covers the six reigning Queens of England, defined by the author as those Queens Regnant who were crowned and anointed - in this case Queens Mary I, Elizabeth I, Mary II, Anne, Victoria, and Elizabeth II. This was a big, fat book - but eminently readable because the author writes the history so well.

In the last millennium there have been only six English female sovereigns: Mary I and Elizabeth I. .

In the last millennium there have been only six English female sovereigns: Mary I and Elizabeth I, Mary II and Anne, Victoria and Elizabeth II, who celebrated her eightieth birthday in 2006. With the exception of Mary I, they are among England’s most successful monarchs. Without Mary II and Anne, the Glorious Revolution of 1688 might not have taken place. In this richly compelling narrative, Maureen Waller delves into the intimate lives of England’s queens regnant in delicious detail, assessing their achievements from a female perspective.

Sovereign Ladies is the story of the six women who have ruled Great Britian. Waller's book discusses in scintillating chapters the following queens: 1. Mary I (reign-1553-1558). Bloody Mary so called because of the over 300 Protestants burned at the stake during her reign. Mary followed Edward IV her Protestant half brother to the throne.

The book continues throughout the other queens. An interesting concept, focusing on the queens regnant in England. Victoria and onto the current Queen Elizabeth II and effectively weaves an analysis of the adaptation and precedence that were set by each of these remarkable women. Each lived in a distinctly unique period of history and had to shape their reigns based upon the prejudice and the very limited precedence set for her by her predecessors. mgaulding, March 23, 2008. Unfortunately for the story, however, the power of these reigning queens really falls away after Elizabeth I, and the stories of the latter queens suffers for it.

In Sovereign Ladies, Maureen Waller looks at the unique challenges and sacrifices each of these women faced. A rich, engaging narrative that explores their political triumphs and failures, revealing the reigning queens as shrewd enough to succeed in a realm that had no place for woman. Waller also examines the personal compromises each monarch faced, as they struggled to balance the traditional duties of wife and mother with the demands of holding the most powerful position in the nation. Waller's take is refreshingly feminist.

Sovereign Ladies - Maureen Waller.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In this richly compelling narrative of royalty, Maureen Waller delves into the intimate lives of England's queens regnant in delicious detail, assessing their achievements from a female perspective. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Macmillan PublishersReleased: Nov 26, 2013ISBN: 9781466858022Format: book. Sovereign Ladies - Maureen Waller. Sovereign Ladies contains facts you may not know. Even if you're well versed with the history of the queens in this book, you will learn something new about each one. If you love the British monarchy you will want to read this book. The British Weekly and Hollywood Today.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In the bestselling tradition of authors Antonia Fraser and David Starkey, Maureen Waller has written a fascinating .

In the bestselling tradition of authors Antonia Fraser and David Starkey, Maureen Waller has written a fascinating narrative history--a brilliant combination of drama and biographical insight--of the six women who have ruled England in their own names. In the last millennium there have been only six English female sovereigns: Mary I and Elizabeth I, Mary. II and Anne, Victoria and Elizabeth II, who celebrated her eightieth birthday in 2006. In this richly compelling narrative, Maureen Waller delves into the intimate lives of England's queens regnant in delicious detail, assessing their achievements from a female perspective.

Maureen Waller has written a fascinating narrative history---a brilliant combination of drama and biographical insight on the British monarchy---of the six women who have ruled England in their own names.

In the last millennium there have been only six English female sovereigns: Mary I and Elizabeth I, Mary II and Anne, Victoria and Elizabeth II. With the exception of Mary I, they are among England's most successful monarchs. Without Mary II and Anne, the Glorious Revolution of 1688 might not have taken place. Elizabeth I and Victoria each gave their name to an age, presiding over long periods when Britain made significant progress in the growth of empire, prestige, and power. All of them have far-reaching legacies. Each faced personal sacrifices and emotional dilemmas in her pursuit of political power. How to overcome the problem of being a female ruler when the sex was considered inferior? Does a queen take a husband and, if so, how does she reconcile the reversal of the natural order, according to which the man should be the master? A queen's first royal duty is to provide an heir to the throne, but at what cost?

In this richly compelling narrative of royalty, Maureen Waller delves into the intimate lives of England's queens regnant in delicious detail, assessing their achievements from a female perspective.

Whitebeard
History is one of those subjects that endlessly fascinates me. And one of my favourite times and places is England. So it was pretty much a given that I would pick up Maureen Waller's latest study on the six women who have ruled as monarchs in their own right.

The six women here enjoy a unique position in history, ruling alone (with one exception) and helping to shape what we now know as England. Each one had a very different personality and would help to provide plenty of legend and mythology to what we think of as a Queen. One of them is still living, and several have become icons in the modern mind.

Mary I, Elizabeth I, Mary II, Anne, Victoria and Elizabeth II, are probably better known than their male counterparts. They have been the subjects of innumerable books and films, and have inspired the arts, social custom and were often the catalysts for change in the time that they ruled.

I have to say, I was not that impressed by this book. Each queen is covered in a series of vignettes, most of them rather scanty and feeling rushed, despite the attempt of the author to provide some historical and personal details. If that wasn't enough, Waller also tries to include some psychological insights, and also some medical theories as to why each woman behaved the way she did. The result is a thin narrative that doesn't really satisfy.

Technically, the stories are written in a bland, matter-of-fact way that left me feeling rather bored by the stories, despite quite a bit of drama that occurs in each life. What I was hoping for was something new -- after all, how many more biographies of Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria can the market handle? And Waller has already written an outstanding book about Mary II and Anne titled <a href="[...]">Ungrateful Daughters</a>, about James II and the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

Along with the narrative, there are two inserts of colour and black and white photographs, as well as genealogical tables. The bibliography is about the best thing here, giving plenty of ideas for further research.

Summing up, I would recommend this one for someone who doesn't know very much about the subject, but if you've already read biographies about these women, and are looking for something new, it's going to be a pretty dull read. Throughout the book, my attention kept wandering and I found myself bored silly. That's not a good sign, especially with history. Waller has already proved that she can do much better than this, and it's a real disappointment overall.

Three stars overall. Somewhat recommended.
Nakora
Disappointed in the condition of this product! It was misrepresented & is not in pristine condition! Can't give as a gift!
Vudozilkree
Great read.
Tar
interesting and a good adjunct to period books and films and helps to pull together time and personality studies of this place in history.
Wel
great story
Xinetan
AN EXCELLENT BOOK THAT IS INFORMATIVE AND EXTREMELY INTERESTING. ALTHOUGH I AM FAMILIAR WITH EACH SOVEREIGN I LEARNED MUCH MORE THAN I EXPECTED TO. THE INSIGHT INTO THE TIMES MADE EACH SEGMENT RELEVANT. A VERY WORTHWHILE READ.
Mikale
Maureen Waller, British Historian, made what could be dry history interesting to non-historians with this brilliant book covering the 6 women who wore the crown in their own names; Tudor sisters, the Catholic, Mary I and her half-sister the Protestant, Elizabeth I; the descendants of Mary Queen of Scots the Stewart sisters, Mary II (who ruled with her Dutch husband, William III) followed by her sister Queen Anne; Queen Victoria, the longest reigning British monarch; and the current Queen Elizabeth II who may very well surpass Victoria's longevity on the throne.

Without a doubt the most interesting, formidable, educated, politically astute and powerful of all these queens was Elizabeth I. She was an absolute sovereign monarch who not only reigned by ruled; a far cry from her namesake Elizabeth II, who can only suggest, advise, the Prime Minister & parliament who rule the commonwealth in her name. In 1837 when Victoria came to the throne a great many powers still remained in the sovereign's hands, and with the worldwide expansion of the colonial system durng her reign "the sun never set on the British Empire" yet was also during Victoria's reign that powers were slowly but permanently moved to the Parliament.

The Stewarts were fascinating because it was least familiar though their post-reformation reigns took place when Britain fought some of its greatest battles with the French and Protestant England again to to face the religious question for the fist time since the Elizabethan period. Mary & Anne's father, James II, while a widower and heir to his childless brother Charles II's throne, married a Italian Princess and converted to catholicism. James II's reign was cut short when the English with the help of the Dutch in the person of his son-in-law, William of Orange, in the name of the Protestant faith, forced him from the throne and alon with his wife, James II's daughter Mary, ruled in England in the duel Monarchy of William & Mary, although William was said to be the true power to which Mary "as a good wife" quite happily deferred. Queen Anne had an interesting friendship with Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, whose family gained prominence under her reign, and would claim a bigger stake in history with their descendant Winston Churchill serving as Prime Minister during England's greatest hour.

The small portion of the book alloted to the current Queen was not new, just more of the same gossipy material covered for decades in the tabloids. Although Ms. Waller, commends her unwavering dedication to her duty, she is compared less favourably with her predecessors because she in fact does not rule England, rather her reign is more about ceremony & tradition. Personally she is a emotionally stronger version of her great great grandmother Queen Victoria, an unimaginative woman, although great learner and hard worker, with a strained relationship to her eldest son & heir, and takes more delight in her horses & dogs than in engaging her people. Her inability to connect to her people, reached a crisis point upon the death of the Princess of Wales, and the monarchy could have easily yielded to republicanism when the Queen had to be dragged from Balmoral Castle back to London to comfort her people. Fortunately, the young PM Tony Blair much more astute about the body politic in the age of mass media shouldered her through this crisis, and has since regained her popularity.

In an age when monarchy is a quaint but archaic ideology, the English may quite possibly be seeing the last of it with Elizabeth II. Yet even in the most modern of societies we still long for pomp & circumstance that royalty are so good at. Brilliantly stated by Walter Bagehot author of the classic treatise "The English Constitution" "The more democratic we get the more we shall get to like state and show, what have ever pleased the vulgar,".