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Memoris and Biographies
Author: Anthony Levi
ISBN: 0786709316
Subcategory: Historical
Pages 352 pages
Publisher Da Capo Press; First edition (unstated) edition (January 9, 2002)
Language English
Category: Memoris and Biographies
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 298
ePUB size: 1915 kb
FB2 size: 1290 kb
DJVU size: 1162 kb
Other formats: lit docx mbr rtf

eBook Cardinal Richelieu: And the Making of France download

by Anthony Levi


I'm grateful for that, despite the book's onerous flaws - sometimes incoherent writing, an at times merciless academic posture, and some unnecessary repetition.

I'm grateful for that, despite the book's onerous flaws - sometimes incoherent writing, an at times merciless academic posture, and some unnecessary repetition.

minence: Cardinal Richelieu and the Rise of France Paperback. Jean-Vincent Blanchard. Under Richelieu, France became more than a mere geographic expression. He launched efforts to enforce linguistic unity and effectively fought the centrifugal tendencies of the great feudal lords. He created the French Academy, and a national theater, and initiated state domination of the educational system. Of course, in foreign affairs, his statecraft made France the greatest power in continental Europe.

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I found Anthony Levi's biography on Cardinal Richelieu to be quite readable and informative. The author definitely appears to know his subject well and the complex personality of Richelieu comes out with clarity and understanding. A man of contradiction and contrast. com User, August 1, 2003. This is a good work of popular history.

The story of Cardinal Richelieu is one of high drama, ruthless ambition and political intrigue.

Читать бесплатно книгу Cardinal Richelieu and the making of France. Полное библиографическое описание. Историческая литература (Levi . и другие произведения в разделе Каталог. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. На сайте вы можете найти издание, заказать доставку или забронировать. Возможна доставка в удобную библиотеку. Cardinal Richelieu and the making of France : историческая литература, A. Levi. London : Robinson, 2001. XXIII, 327 p. : il, map. This book is written without frills and with Richelieu-esque discipline

The story of Cardinal Richelieu is one of high drama, ruthless ambition and political intrigue. This book is written without frills and with Richelieu-esque discipline. Yet so colourful is the material and so shrewd Levi’s eye for detail that this is an assured and enjoyable introduction to the cardinal that succeeds in its aim of showing how he made France. – Sunday Times, Sept. The study of history brings with it two great pleasures.

Cardinal Armand Jean du Plessis, Duke of Richelieu (French pronunciation: ; 9 September 1585 – 4 December 1642), commonly referred to as Cardinal Richelieu (UK: /ˈrɪʃəljɜː, ˈriːʃ-/, US: /ˈrɪʃəl(j)uː, ˈriːʃ-/; French: Cardinal de . .

Cardinal Armand Jean du Plessis, Duke of Richelieu (French pronunciation: ; 9 September 1585 – 4 December 1642), commonly referred to as Cardinal Richelieu (UK: /ˈrɪʃəljɜː, ˈriːʃ-/, US: /ˈrɪʃəl(j)uː, ˈriːʃ-/; French: Cardinal de Richelieu (listen)), was a French clergyman and statesman. He was consecrated as a bishop in 1607 and was appointed Foreign Secretary in 1616

Levi, Anthony, Cardinal Richelieu and the Making of France, London, Constable, 2000.

Levi, Anthony, Cardinal Richelieu and the Making of France, London, Constable, 2000. Lindemann, Albert . The Jew Accused: Three Anti-Semitic Affairs (Dreyfus, Beilis, Frank), 1894–1915, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1991. McManners, John, Church and State in France, 1870–1914, London, SPCK, 1972.

In an extraordinary drama sweeping across seventeenth-century France, this probing biography of Cardinal Richelieu explores how a man of steely intelligence and ruthless ambition not only fulfilled his dreams of social prestige, personal wealth, and political power but at the same time realized his vision of a France unified as much by its culture as by its king.
Alsardin
This book was written by a former Jesuit, which is advantageous because Jesuits are renown for their intelligence and scholarship and secondly because he deals at some length with the religious aspect of the Cardinal which other biographers pay lip service to. The Cardinal's influence on French literature is also dealt with at length. Having said that, the author is frankly enamored of his subject. To be sure, there is no question that Richelieu was a fascinating historical character. As a major player in the 30 Years' War, Richelieu should be roasting in hell for a long time to come. I wonder if his constant maladies may have been psychosomatic in character (he aided Protestants against Catholics).

There is a lot of detail here, some of it tedious to be sure, and the narrative is labyrinthic to the point that one needs a scorecard. Particularly irritating was the prevalence of treason among the aristocracy; this was the time before the French monarchy became absolute. Some of the treason involved sex, always a fun subject.

In reading this book, one should also read a companion piece, a biography of the Cardinal's right hand man, Father Joseph, who ran an international spy network. I suggest Huxley's Grey Eminence.
Madis
I believe that most contemporary folks only know of Cardinal Richelieu from two sources: 1. As the scheming villain of countless "Three Musketeers" films, or 2. As the surprise witness at the parking ticket trial in the famous Monthy Python sketch. Both these portrayals, of course, are incorrect, and the author of this fine work has endeavored mightily to correct any wrong impressions we may have about this justly famous, but reviled, man. Levi's Richelieu was a churchman of true faith and belief who spent his life trying to consolidate the French people and sovereign into a modern nation state, and succeeded, more or less, by the time of his death. It is a fascinating read, marred only by the changing names of some of the players, and a light going over of French history that often leaves the lay reader confused as to what was happening where and by whom. It's worth finishing, though, to give insight into the mind and actions of a man who had a goal, and stayed with it in a single-minded way during his entire career in public service to his king and country.
Kriau
This is a good work of popular history. As he wrote it, Levi was probably thinking of people like me who know their knowledge of French history in the 17th century is inadequate but don't want to spend months in the library filling in the gaps. The book is full of important figures like Marie de Medici, Anne of Austria, and Gaston of Orleans, but Richelieu and his career are at the center of the whole story. The author is at his best when analyzing Richelieu psychologically and morally, but he seems to value those of his subject's virtues that might place him closer to the Homeric moral universe than to ours. He praises the cardinal for his bravery, tenacity, and ruthlessness rather than looking for signs of compassion, tenderness, or justice. Of course Richelieu was intensely loyal to the king, Louis XIII, but he was equally loyal to his own quest for power, prestige, and possessions, three realms in which he met with overwhelming success. One of the interesting side issues in the book is the king's inability to relate sexually to women and his dalliances with several men, most notably with Cinq-Mars, who betrayed him. Richelieu did his best to protect the king's reputation even in this area. The more important question Levi works with is how Richelieu almost single-handedly changed France from a collection of separate areas, princedoms and duchies, with their various customs, laws, traditions and loyalties, into a modern nation-state under the absolute authority of the monarch. He also did much to promote culture, art, and literature. But he achieved all this at the cost of unendurable suffering among the common people, who were over-taxed, underfed, and who lived in general misery. Naturally, he was generally despised.
Ndlaitha
I agree with another reviewer that a lot of unnecessary wandering in the wilderness makes this book a tiring effort to enjoy, but some of the reviews seem to miss utterly the author's intense perspective which is nothing less than a fervent glance at Richelieu unscourged. Levi's historical take is often speculative, or is it? Perhaps it's more an unsolicited testament of things from the vantage point of those whom many historians have decided, in their churning quest to install an egalitarian privilege, are easily brushed aside, their subject's particular paradigm having been in their view eclipsed.

Richelieu himself, master of detail, would likely find himself more readily in Levi's book than in most textbooks and any number of insufficient biographies. You'll need a comprehensive understanding of the royal houses of Europe and the intricate volleying and snuggling between them to make sense of quite a bit of this book. Nor will you find a wholesale dismissal of the Roman Church's temporal politics here, and rightly so. This, after all, is history, not a fairyland for the democracy besotted. Even an Irish Times review on the back of the book can't help referring to "an allegedly devout mystery..." I suspect there are already too many allegedly brave biographies whose principle recommendation is a tawdry bias.

Levi's book gives an unindicted account of the Cardinal and his world. I'm grateful for that, despite the book's onerous flaws - sometimes incoherent writing, an at times merciless academic posture, and some unnecessary repetition. Four solid stars, but then, I'm a stickler for the real thing.