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Memoris and Biographies
Author: Linda Hogan
ISBN: 0393323056
Subcategory: Arts & Literature
Pages 224 pages
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company; 4/17/02 edition (May 17, 2002)
Language English
Category: Memoris and Biographies
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 751
ePUB size: 1764 kb
FB2 size: 1619 kb
DJVU size: 1969 kb
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eBook The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir download

by Linda Hogan


This memoir takes you on a frank and honest journey into the world of Linda Hogan. Linda Hogan is one of the best authors I've read with her transcendent flowing stories of such beauty they bring tears to my eyes and leave me admiring her and her characters

This memoir takes you on a frank and honest journey into the world of Linda Hogan. Her personal spirituality vis-a-vis her Chickasaw background is a foundation for much of her way of looking at the world. It has clearly been a source of strength and resilience for the difficult times she has faced and overcome. Linda Hogan is one of the best authors I've read with her transcendent flowing stories of such beauty they bring tears to my eyes and leave me admiring her and her characters. Her novels make me want to be a better person.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

com User, June 13, 2003. A few years ago, I had a phase where I read memoirs seeking insights into how to live a full meaningful life. To my innocent surprise, I instead found that many people write their memoirs as versions of the lives they WISH they had lived rather than the real thing.

item 1 & Linda& Woman Who Watches Over The World (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -& Linda& Woman . Pam Houston, O Magazine.

item 1 & Linda& Woman Who Watches Over The World (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -& Linda& Woman Who Watches Over The World (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW. £1. 5. item 2 The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir by Linda Hogan (English) P -The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir by Linda Hogan (English) P. 2.

Other articles where The Woman Who Watches Over the World is discussed: Linda Hogan. orld (1995) and the memoir The Woman . orld (1995) and the memoir The Woman Who Watches Over the World (2001). World", "title": "The Woman Who Watches Over the World", "documentGroup": "TOPIC PAGINATED INDEX","gaExtraDimensions": {"3":"false"} } }. The Woman Who Watches Over the World.

Hogan's lyrical work is considered to have a voice of literary activism and in. .2008) and a book of new and selected poetry containing work from the 1970s until 2014. The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir.

Hogan's lyrical work is considered to have a voice of literary activism and in it is Native spirituality and indigenous knowledge systems of all genres She considers her work politically centered because it is about a world view that cannot be separated from the political. Her most recent books are The Book of Medicines (1993) and Rounding the Human Corners.

A Chicksaw woman blends her personal history of struggle with the stories of native women who participated in key events during the Indian Wars more than a century ago. show more.

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Top 10 most dangerous airports in the world 2019 - Продолжительность: 10:23 World Top ONE Recommended for you. 10:23. Дамасская сталь из Шариков от подшипника. 20 Greatest video of Ships Crashing and Beaching Around the World, it's CRAZY!!! - Продолжительность: 12:39 Captain Captain Recommended for you. 12:39.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Woman Who Watches Over the World . Linda Hogan was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for her novel Mean Spirit. Her other honors include an American Book Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Linda Hogan was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for her novel Mean Spirit. She lives in Tishomingo, Oklahoma. Country of Publication.

The Chickasaw poet and novelist Hogan (Power, 1998) offers a personal and family memoir that is neither poem nor novel, but more like a series of journal entries. The snippets, as it were, of Hogan’s life are extraordinarily revealing, telling of a relationship with an older man that began-with her parents’ acceptance-when she was only 12, of her years of drunkenness, of the tragic failure to heal the deep psychic scars of her two adopted daughters (love isn’t always enough, she notes), of the debilitating.

"A deeply courageous account of Hogan's personal and tribal history...staggering."―Pam Houston, O Magazine

"I sat down to write a book about pain and ended up writing about love," says award-winning Chickasaw poet and novelist Linda Hogan. In this book, she recounts her difficult childhood as the daughter of an army sergeant, her love affair at age fifteen with an older man, the legacy of alcoholism, the troubled history of her adopted daughters, and her own physical struggles since a recent horse accident. She shows how historic and emotional pain are passed down through generations, blending personal history with stories of important Indian figures of the past such as Lozen, the woman who was the military strategist for Geronimo, and Ohiesha, the Santee Sioux medical doctor who witnessed the massacre at Wounded Knee. Ultimately, Hogan sees herself and her people whole again and gives an illuminating story of personal triumph. "This wise and compassionate offering deserves to be widely read."―Publishers Weekly, starred review
Iphonedivorced
She is one of the greatest writers that ever wrote on this world. I'm reading now his novel Power and can't believe the depth, subtlety and style of this master. The Woman... is a transforming book. If you are going to read a book in the rest of your life, make it this one.
JoJolar
This memoir takes you on a frank and honest journey into the world of Linda Hogan. Her personal spirituality vis-a-vis her Chickasaw background is a foundation for much of her way of looking at the world. It has clearly been a source of strength and resilience for the difficult times she has faced and overcome. I was awestruck at the beauty of the language, yet found myself reading faster and faster just to find out how Hogan survived the many events. Brilliantly executed and crafted, this is a wonderful book by one of the country's leading writers.
Gholbirius
Linda Hogan's prose is simply beautiful. Her book of essays, Dwellings, is one I've read a number of times because it is wise and elegant, so when I saw that she'd written a memoir, I was eager to read it, but doubted it could rise to that level of excellence. It does. Not only do we receive her story, which honestly includes years drinking , a youthful love affair, current painful illness, and her devastating injury on a horse, but it is delivered in crafted language. The result is difficult stories carried in lovely phrases, evocative images, and profound reflections.
Diab
This book is characterized by beautiful writing and deep insight. Hogan is a brave writer, not afraid to go where experience takes her. Enjoy. I did.
Fordrellador
i'm mixing them all together and forgetting which is which. this has good parts and intense parts. Mean Spirit is the best. she does say amazing things and i am reading them all.
Nothing personal
Linda Hogan finds peace in a world of spiritual and physical pain through her relationship with the world around her. Her Native American world view, the fact that we are all connected, informs her search.
Granijurus
I enjoyed this very much in the early chapters, but found the last few rather tedious. But still worth reading. I am a big Hogan fiction fan--I think her Mean Spirit is my favorite. The first part reaches that level of interest and insight, in my opinion, but the ending does not.
Linda Hogan is one of the best authors I've read with her transcendent flowing stories of such beauty they bring tears to my eyes and leave me admiring her and her characters. Her novels make me want to be a better person. Interested to know about her life, and imagining her to be at least partly Navajo due to her last name, I breathlessly opened "The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir" to be deeply disappointed. The introduction was as lyrical and magical as one would expect. Having read in other places that she is one of the mixed bloods who grew up in the cities, I was horrified to read what she described as a love story, a "marriage" of living with an adult man while her father was stationed in Germany, from age 12 to 15. I'd call that child abuse. She implied earlier that she'd grown up in Oklahoma which almost felt like Wannabes exaggerated claims, as her time in Oklahoma seemed to have been brief visits, but I don't know the details of her life and have no right to decide her perceptions.

Her father was mostly Chickasaw, his grandfather having obtained property by marrying an Indian woman; her mother "Pennsylvania Dutch" read German. The family was so strained with three wars isolating a young mother with children, that silences were strained and the kids were left acting out pain. Her mother sounds like she was clinically depressed. Linda Hogan describes how history caused the alcoholism that so many Indians suffer and calls her own drinking years "the lost years". Her own marriage gets a sentence or two, another mystery.

Later, she adopted two sisters and described giving one up who had been too damaged by her life before adoption to keep. Didn't see that one coming. In constant physical pain since a fall riding horseback that she attributes to behaviors by men, either before or during the ride, she says she thought she was writing about pain, but was really writing about love. Family and friends surely did take care of her. She loves nature and animals clearly, but I wasn't convinced about the rest.

Like all of us, the author sees herself responding to life in a relatively blameless manner while others have caused her pain and behaviors. It could be that historic pain, alienation, being left too much alone to cope with too much did cause each mistake and misstep she's made?

Perhaps it is her writing style of mixing myth, history, and reality that left me struggling to understand who she is, more puzzled than ever. Perhaps the fault is me and my expectations. Think I'll read another novel she's written and give up trying to know the author.