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eBook The Drug Trial: Nancy Olivieri and the Science Scandal that Rocked the Hospital for Sick Children download
Medical Books
Author: Miriam Shuchman
ISBN: 0679313672
Subcategory: Medicine
Pages 464 pages
Publisher Vintage Canada; Reprint edition
Language English
Category: Medical Books
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 253
ePUB size: 1712 kb
FB2 size: 1944 kb
DJVU size: 1822 kb
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eBook The Drug Trial: Nancy Olivieri and the Science Scandal that Rocked the Hospital for Sick Children download

by Miriam Shuchman


The attempt muzzle Nancy Olivieri was simply wrong, just plain wrong, clearly wrong, and she has been vindicated on that point. What led up to that event, and the how and why of the surrounding and subsequent events, is anything but plain and simple. The ensuing battle was breathtakingly nasty. Olivieri was not the physician in charge of the mistreated case of the sickle cell patient.

The first was commissioned by the Hospital. It singled out Olivieri for special criticism but was quickly shown to be based upon misinformation. Next, the Canadian Association of University Teachers commissioned a report from three eminent academics. Their book exonerates Olivieri, while sharply criticizing the conduct of Apotex, the U of T, and Sick Kids. Then spy novelist John le Carre joined the fray with a murder mystery, The Constant Gardener, casting Olivieri as heroic victim of drug company.

Winner of the Writers' Trust of Canada's Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for.

A charismatic young doctor named Nancy Olivieri, working with young people who suffered from a rare blood . In August 1998, a medical scandal erupted in the national and international media whose consequences still reverberate.

In August 1998, a medical scandal erupted in the national and international media whose consequences still reverberate.

The story of Dr. Nancy Olivieri, a Canadian whistle-blower, was a chilling reminder of the power that drug companies can wield over the release of unfavorable data.

Nancy Olivieri and the Science Scandal That Rocked the Hospital for Sick Children, by Miriam Shuchman. Bibliographic Citation.

Toronto: Random House Canada, 2005. An article from journal Scientia Canadensis (Natural Science in the New World: The Descriptive Enterprise), on Érudit. Volume31, Issue1–2–2008, p. 217–220 Natural Science in the New World: The Descriptive Enterprise.

Winner of the Writers' Trust of Canada's Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing and the Canadian Science Writers' Association's Science in Society Book Award.Poison-pen letters, possible medical misconduct and a swirl of competing accusations that led to two inquiries – the Olivieri affair ended careers and shook the international research establishment. A riveting anatomy of Canada’s most controversial drug trial, by the medical journalist who helped break the story.In August 1998, a medical scandal erupted in the national and international media whose consequences still reverberate. A charismatic young doctor named Nancy Olivieri, working with young people who suffered from a rare blood disorder, stated that she had discovered serious problems with an experimental drug manufactured by Canada’s largest drug company, Apotex. Though her research contract required her to remain silent, she decided she had no choice but to warn the patients enrolled in her trials. Apotex retaliated by cancelling her research and slamming her reputation. In the aftermath, Olivieri became a whistleblower applauded in academia and the media for standing up to powerful corporate interests.The Olivieri affair spawned two inquiries and multiple lawsuits, but the full story of Canada’s biggest science scandal has never been told – until now. In the hands of psychiatrist and medical journalist Miriam Shuchman, the debacle over the pill called L1 is revealed as a modern morality play in which every crack in the system of scientific research, corporate financing and peer review stands out in stark relief.By talking with the people whom both Olivieri and Apotex wanted to heal – the young men and women struggling to have normal lives despite debilitating treatment – Shuchman also brings us the moving story of the toll on patients’ health when battles break out among the physicians and researchers aiming to heal them.From the Hardcover edition.
MrDog
The book was written very details but with easy-reading style. I think it will help you to understand various aspects of scientific research and bioethics.
Faezahn
The book tells a compelling story, with much reference to comtemporary correspondence as source material, and includes interviews with many of the people directly involved. It stays close to the timeline of events, with comment where appropriate to put behaviour into the context of the times. It includes a lot of material that never made it into the contemporary news stories, and paints a picture of the central figure as a formidible person to chose to have as an enemy. It is a case study of a Darwinian struggle for hierarchy within the medical research institutions, and how far smart people were willing to go in responding to impossible situations.

The attempt muzzle Nancy Olivieri was simply wrong, just plain wrong, clearly wrong, and she has been vindicated on that point.

What led up to that event, and the how and why of the surrounding and subsequent events, is anything but plain and simple. The ensuing battle was breathtakingly nasty. One consequence of that struggle, may have been a cost in human life.

All in all, it is a comprehensive history of events, well referenced and made all the more useful with the inclusion of an index.

Steve Thomas

Ontario

Canada
Bumand
The David vs Goliath story that came out of the saga of the trials of the iron chelating drug, deferiprone, may have made for good reading and good newspaper sales, but just being the smaller guy, or girl in this case, does not make you anymore right than Goliath. The stubbornness exhibited by Dr. Oliveri in this case may have endeared her to the press and public, but it unfortunately may also have cost many thalassemia patients their lives. This book exposes the inner goings-on that tarnish the aura of Dr Oliveri and her David-like stand against the drug company, Apotex.

Deferiprone was a new iron chelator developed by Apotex, to remove the deadly excess iron that accumulates in the blood of thalassemia patients who must receive regular blood transfusions to stay alive, as their own bone marrow cannot create a sufficient supply of functional red blood cells. If not removed, this iron will eventually destroy the organs and kill the patients. Until deferiprone was developed, there was only one other medicine that could be used to remove iron and it involved painful nightly subcutaneous injections that went on for 10 or more hours each night. Because of the pain of the long injections and side effects of the drug, many patients do not comply fully with the treatment, leading to iron overload and eventual death. Deferiprone is an orally administered drug and showed the promise of much better chelation compliance.

Dr Oliveri was commissioned by Apotex to run trials on deferiprone to determine both its effectiveness and any possible side effects. After her early trials, Oliveri became concerned that deferiprone was not safe and began the fight that would lead to it never being approved in Canada and the US, even as it has been approved throughout most of the rest of the world.

Shuchman's book gives in great detail, the inner workings of this process and no one comes out smelling like roses. Neither side behaved in the most ethical of manners but while Apotex was roasted in the press, Oliveri was treated like a champion of the little guy. What we find in Shuchman's book is that this is not so much the story of a champion as it is the tale of stubbornness. In spite of what appeared to be serious flaws in her research, Oliveri has refused to revisit her research and has instead, stood in the way of the approval of the drug. With her stature enhanced by her fight against the drug Goliath, Oliveri has wielded much influence.

The main winner in this case was the competing drug company, who coincidentally, recently released their own oral chelator, which reached the market in swift fashion once the patent on their subcutaneous chelator expired. The losers then and now, are the patients who have been deprived of this medicine because of a dispute that would never have happened if a doctor would have been willing to revisit her trials and admit to the inherent flaws in her research. Study after study was done elsewhere and never were her findings repeated. Some researchers write off Oliveri's research into deferiprone as having a too small group of participants, many of whom already had liver damage from iron overload. The result has been that deferiprone has been approved and is used in many countries. Studies have shown that deferiprone is a superior chelator in terms of removing iron deposits from the heart and since heart failure is the number one cause of death among thalassemics, this is quite significant. When I attended the International thalassemia conference in Dubai in January of 2006, I was somewhat amazed at the matter of fact acceptance that deferiprone has gained among doctors and researchers throughout most of the world. here in North America, people are still under the impression that the drug is not safe, while in most other places it is a key part of the arsenal of drugs being used to treat thalassemia.

For years Oliveri has been treated as a hero in her fight against Apotex and portrayed as the victim. She is not. The real victims are the patients who have been deprived of this drug and have died as a result, my best friend among them. Dr. Shuchman has done a great service reminding us that the little guy is not always in the right. Each case should be judged on its own merits and the media should have the responsibility to fully investigate the truth just as Shuchman has done here.
Elildelm
If anyone still thinks that scientists are dispassionate, idealistic seekers of truth had better read this book. Those who believes that the government unnecessarily regulates research done on humans subjects should read this book. Most of all, Shuchman shows how any scientist can have biases and conflicts of interests, that open discourse and objective analysis are the public's best protection and that when there processes break down, people die.

Alma Moon Novotny
Chinon
When Miriam Shuchman first broke the story on CBC and started researching her book, she found that the usual story of "drug companies misbehave" didn't quite explain all of the facts. She *does* document plenty of that, though -- but in this book, pretty much *everyone* misbehaves.

Dr. Shuchman deserves a lot of kudos for coming forward with this book. Many of the quotes are anonymously attributed (but were fact-checked by the publisher), an unsettling indication of the chilling atmosphere surrounding the whole affair. Where egos are concerned, no one is safe from legal action and other retaliatory measures.

This book's contribution to the literature on conflicts of interest is to show that conflicts of interest can be more than simply financial. Publicly funded academic researchers can be motivated by personal rivalries and the drive to achieve academic success just as much as commercially driven drug company researchers can be motivated by money. I hope this book obtains a wide reading.