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eBook Welcome to Britain: The Caravan Gallery download
Humor
Author: Chris Teasdale,Jan Williams
ISBN: 3832792813
Subcategory: Pop Culture
Pages 159 pages
Publisher teNeues (August 15, 2008)
Language English
Category: Humor
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 730
ePUB size: 1154 kb
FB2 size: 1733 kb
DJVU size: 1701 kb
Other formats: txt lrf mobi rtf

eBook Welcome to Britain: The Caravan Gallery download

by Chris Teasdale,Jan Williams


The Caravan Gallery is a mobile exhibition venue and visual arts project run by artists Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale who are on a mission to record the ordinary and extraordinary details of life in 21st century Britain. This is the imagery you won't find in a tourist brochure.

The Caravan Gallery is a mobile exhibition venue and visual arts project run by artists Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale who are on a mission to record the ordinary and extraordinary details of life in 21st century Britain. From tacky seaside signage and risqué double entendres.

Город: Portsmouth & Liverpool et. одписчиков: 9 ты. себе: Artists and photographers Jan Williams . .

Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale from The Caravan Gallery spent time in Belfast as part of Woodvale Festival .

Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale from The Caravan Gallery spent time in Belfast as part of Woodvale Festival, where images from their time on Shankill were shown in Woodvale Park. From tacky seaside signage and risqu? double entendres, to the just plain weird, these tongue-in-cheek vignettes chronicle the perplexities of modern British life. From tacky seaside signage and risque double entendres, to the just plain weird, these tongue-in-cheek vignettes chronicle the perplexities of modern British life. Their focus is everyday eccentricity and the often overlooked. This fresh approach shows just how funny modern "art" can be.

The Caravan Gallery exhibits at an eclectic range of locations, rural, urban and suburban, from .

The Caravan Gallery exhibits at an eclectic range of locations, rural, urban and suburban, from small-scale community events to major festivals and venues. scope for interaction with an extremely diverse audience is enormous, the inevitable feedback (including enthusiastic recommendations of places worthy of investigation) making a valuable contribution to the project. ary and extraordinary details of life in 21st century Britain.

Welcome to Britain book. The Caravan Gallery is a mobile exhibition venue and visual arts. The Caravan Gallery is a mobile exhibition venue and visual arts project run by artists Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale who are on a mission to record the ordinary and extraordinary details of life in 21st century Britain.

2: The Caravan Gallery by Williams, Jan 0956390102 The Cheap -Is Britain Great? . 2: The Caravan Gallery By Chris Teasdale, Jan Williams. The Fast 800 by Michael Mosley Paperback Book 3 Day Express Delivery.

2: The Caravan Gallery by Williams, Jan 0956390102 The Cheap -Is Britain Great? 2: The Caravan Gallery by Williams, Jan 0956390102 The Cheap. item 2 Is Britain Great? 2: The Caravan Gallery By Chris Teasdale, Jan Williams -Is Britain Great? 2: The Caravan Gallery By Chris Teasdale, Jan Williams. item 3 Is Britain Great? 2: The Caravan Gallery by Williams, Jan 0956390102 The Cheap -Is Britain Great? 2: The Caravan Gallery by Williams, Jan 0956390102 The Cheap.

The Caravan Gallery is a mobile exhibition venue and visual arts project run by artists Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale who are on a mission to record the ordinary and extraordinary details of life in 21st century Britain. This is the imagery you won't find in a tourist brochure. From tacky seaside signage and risqué double entendres, to the just plain weird, these tongue-in-cheek vignettes chronicle the perplexities of modern British life. Their focus is everyday eccentricity and the often overlooked. This fresh approach shows just how funny modern "art" can be.
Otiel
A welcome reprint of a 2005 edition that takes a very wry and funny look that captures the essence of the real Britain in a few hundred colour photos. Originally on display in the Caravan Gallery, a mustard-colored 1969 home-from-home that tours the country and presents, to whoever feels like stepping inside, an affectionate look at the endearing shabbiness of the country.

The two authors have scoured the land for some wonderfully offbeat images including little trains, markets, dogs, bins, derelict garages and shops, seaside, burnt out cars, picnics, toilets, food, litter or graffiti. A spread just called Chicken has eleven photos of premises such as Hentucky Fried Chicken, Chicken 'U' Like, Chicken Cottage and Chick 'O' Land. The chapter on Smut shows two street signs: Canal St. and Morgan Street both missing the first letter of each word.

Scattered throughout the pages are several of the Caravan Gallery parody postcards like AWARD WINNING PORTSMOUTH with four photos including the recently torn down Tricorn Centre, RELAXING BRACKNELL showing four sad looking public benches, GARDENS OF ENGLAND: predictably suburban flagstone and concrete gardens and don't forget the dead conifers.

Wonderful though these photos are I thought it was unfortunate that they were let down by the book's design (so four stars). Magnum photographer Martin Parr in his book Martin Parr took a similar photographic take on the cliché of Englishness but in his book the images work so well because they were presented in the formal format of the photo book. I think Williams and Teasdale's fascinating photos deserve a much better presentation than the bland layouts and dull typography in 'Welcome to Britain'. It is sort of ironic that these two brilliantly capture the ordinariness of British life only to have it presented in a very ordinary looking book.

Since the first edition of the book in 2005 Williams and Teasdale's published, in 2007, a book of similar photos: Is Britain Great?: The Caravan Gallery which I thought looked so much better because the photos were large and one to a page in a landscape shaped book.

Both books brilliantly capture an aspect of Britishness that you'll see everywhere if you visit the country.

***SEE SOME INSIDE PAGES by clicking 'customer images' under the cover.
Samulkis
In "Welcome to Britain: A Celebration of Real Life", Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale have produced an alternative to the glossy blue-sky, soft-focus photo-guides which line the travel shelves of bookshops throughout the land and are designed to lure tourists into the more photogenic of this country's tourist traps. The intention in this little book is to highlight -- and also, as the title claims, celebrate -- the more real, everyday features of life in Britain today. As a caravan-based touring exhibition of photographs and postcards (which is how this collection began life) the project probably works well; as a book, it fails miserably, I'm afraid. The presentation in small book format leaves the images very cramped so that they fail to deliver any significant impact. The book's organisation doesn't help either; divided into sections, with images grouped into themes, there are unfortunately rather too few photographs within each section -- and those that appear are too similar to each other -- to really carry each theme anywhere at all. At times it's less of a theme than a caption. And again, few of the images carry any real message. Just occasionally there is an effective grab-shot of some mildly amusing aspect of British behaviour but by and large this book is so weighed down with views of the gross, the sordid, the shoddy and the shabby that it ultimately makes neither point nor impact. It is just a depressing survey of the things that most people see every day and which I for one see far too much of already.

There are many aspects of the under-belly of modern Britain that would make for an interesting and informative photographic study and indeed, which are badly neglected and yet provide very real reason for celebration. Sadly, Williams and Teasdale don't seem to have found (or noticed) very many of them and have presented us instead with a series of mundane images which are so unbalanced in their selection that at times they appear even more unreal and artificial than the air-brushed make-believe which they claim they set out to correct. I can't help feeling that a little more observation and a lot more sensitivity would have worked wonders here and produced something much more worthwhile. As it is, this is a very disappointing production indeed.