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eBook The Story of Film download
Humor
Author: Mark Cousins
ISBN: 1862057605
Subcategory: Movies
Publisher Pavilion Books (September 28, 2006)
Language English
Category: Humor
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 856
ePUB size: 1236 kb
FB2 size: 1853 kb
DJVU size: 1483 kb
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eBook The Story of Film download

by Mark Cousins


With that said, the book is not an entirely successful venture, primarily due to Cousins' frequent references to technological and stylistic innovations which the average reader (even the "intelligent general audience" member he appeals to) will find obscure, and which the more informed reader may quibble with.

The Story of Film book. Mark Cousins’s chronological journey through the worldwide history of film is told from the point of view of filmmakers and moviegoers. Weaving personalities, film technology, and production with engaging descriptions of groundbreaking scenes, Cousins uses his experience as film historian, The Story of Film presents the history of the movies in a way never told before.

The Story of Film by Mark Cousins. It was directed and narrated by Mark Cousins, a film critic from Northern Ireland, based on his 2004 book The Story of Film. Written by. Mark Cousins. Directed by. Narrated by. The series was broadcast in September 2011 on More4, the digital television service of UK broadcaster Channel 4. The Story of Film was also featured in its entirety at the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival, and it was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in February 2012. It was broadcast in the United States on.

A Story of Children and Film is a personal and poetic essay by Mark Cousins which explores what cinema tells us. .The Story of Film is a feast for cinema lovers. Mark Cousins adapts his celebrated book of the same title into this audacious fifteen-hour project

A Story of Children and Film is a personal and poetic essay by Mark Cousins which explores what cinema tells us about childhood, and what childhood tells us about cinema, by reference to movies from all around the world. A Story of Children and Film is a personal and poetic essay by Mark Cousins which explores what cinema tells us about childhood, and what childhood tells us about cinema, by reference to movies from all around the world. Mark Cousins adapts his celebrated book of the same title into this audacious fifteen-hour project.

Film critic, producer and presenter, Mark Cousins shows how film-makers are influenced both by the historical events of their times, and by each other. He demonstrates, for example, how Douglas Sirk's Hollywood melodramas of the 1950s influenced Rainer Werner Fassbinder's despairing visions of 1970s Germany; and how George Lucas' Star Wars epics grew out of Akira Kurosawa's The Hidden Fortress

Film critic, producer and presenter, Mark Cousins shows how film-makers are influenced both by the historical events of their times, and by each other

Film critic, producer and presenter, Mark Cousins shows how film-makers are influenced both by the historical events of their times, and by each other. He demonstrates, for example, how Douglas Sirk's Hollywood melodramas of the 1950s influenced Rainer Werner Fassbinder's despairing visions of 1970s Germany; and how George Lucas' Star Wars epics grew out of Akira Kurosawa's The Hidden Fortress.

Motion pictures, Motion picture producers and directors, Cinematography. New York : Thunder's Mouth Press.

Written by film-maker, critic and one-time television presenter Mark Cousins, The Story of Looking is certainly .

Written by film-maker, critic and one-time television presenter Mark Cousins, The Story of Looking is certainly timely. It roams freely across history, art, film, photography, science and technology. For students of art and film, The Story of Looking may well prove indispensable as a reference book, but it seems a rather well-mannered and all too forgiving response to the turbulent times we live in., The Story of Looking by Mark Cousins is published by Canongate (£25). com or call 0330 333 6846. Art and design books.

Very Good!
Goldenfang
When I set out to understand - nearly from scratch - the history of film, this loving, passionate, erudite, surprising and absolutely essential book was my main guide and inspiration. After dog-earing it and watching the accompanying film twice, I went forth with a camera and made my first film, which went on to win the Sundance Grand Jury Prize for World Documentary in 2015.

I love the fact that Cousins lingers in little known parts of the world and with lesser known filmmakers (of course, Hollywood, etc., get their proper due). And most importantly, the unifying theme of INNOVATION is an extremely helpful lens through which to organize a book, and assess new work.
ME
Mark Cousins' impressive overview of the last 100+ years in world cinema is both engaging and meticulously researched. Unlike the frustrating collective anthology "1,001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", "Story" is very much a personal project; as Cousins writes, his goal is to "open a door to the world of cinema and describe *a* reliable path through it" (emphasis mine). He's quick to point out that many beloved films and directors are missing from the text, and it seems pointless to try to quibble with his selections -- indeed, omissions seem inevitable in such a massive undertaking.

With that said, the book is not an entirely successful venture, primarily due to Cousins' frequent references to technological and stylistic innovations which the average reader (even the "intelligent general audience" member he appeals to) will find obscure, and which the more informed reader may quibble with. On page 482, for instance, he references "the unflattering honesty with which [Nan Goldin] films people and her habit of non colour-correcting sodium lighting" -- the majority of readers will have no idea what "sodium lighting" refers to, while photography buffs will argue that the available natural lighting Goldin relies on is likely tungsten, not sodium. Similarly, on pages 250-251, Cousins mentions that the lens used to film several sequences in Bresson's "Pickpocket" was "50 mm, which approximates human vision"; this estimation is only accurate for 35 mm still photography, but, more importantly, his point will likely be lost altogether on most readers. Ironically, I believe Cousins' explanations would benefit from *less* detail and more strategic scaffolding of the basic ideas he'd like to get across to interested readers.

Keeping in mind once again that Cousins very clearly stipulates that he's taking a "certain path" through world cinema, readers should note that many of the selections in his book will not necessarily be enjoyable to the average (again, even the average "intelligent") cinephile. Cousins' appreciation is more that of an art historian than a moviegoer. With that said, it's undeniably refreshing to see the more obscure gems of "third world" cinema given their due, even if most viewers will never find copies to rent.

In sum, this meticulously crafted book (albeit one full of typos, which should be addressed before a second printing) will excite and inspire most readers to watch -- and re-watch -- literally hundreds of diverse films. Years after taking my first film appreciation course in college, I've been reminded about the meta-narrative of movies over the ages, about how cinema often reflects diverse sociological concerns, and about how directors tend to build upon (or diverge from) their predecessors. It's an exciting story, and Cousins is a worthy, dedicated storyteller.
Kaim
We usually have to learn about film history from books, which can only show stills. This has always seemed to fall short of doing justice to the subject. The film series from Mark Cousins allows us to see the moving clips, which I consider essential. It was a thrill to see the earliest work that is not available elsewhere to most of us. The narration was insightful and well-written. The advantage of the companion book is that we can read it rather than listen to it, which became annoying at times. The narrator ends every sentence with an upward tilt, as if all of it is a question. There is no question that this series finally covers the globe. We get to see film from Africa, Asia, Latin America--this is not just Hollywood. It treats film as art, covering innovations in form as well as content.
Jediathain
The remarkable thing about this book is just how many must see movies it added to my list. It's coverage is genuinely global and covers the entire history of film world wide. I am not so sure about how well it fits film into the national histories of the countries concerned but any weakness in this area is more than made up with its focus on technique, scene analysis and simply throwing new light on familiar and unfamiliar films. An eye opener and it also has a good bibliography to assist further study. The related DVD documentary by Mark Cousins seems equally interesting from the four episodes I have so far seen.
Abandoned Electrical
It's a very good and comprehensive history of world cinema. Now I sure know why I dislike some kind of films. Unfortunately I've found few minor mistakes about some facts but it's a must for those who are interested to know the story of cinema around the world.
Cells
In terms of content, this book is a gem. However, the number of typos are very distracting.
It seems like it could have used another sweep by an editor.
Unh
To all film lovers, The Story of Film is a must. An invaluable learning set and a tool for research. Got to get it.
I enjoyed this visual history of Hollywood from the silent and golden eras of the studio system. Some pre-Hollywood and post studio events are also revealed.