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eBook Uncle Rudolf download
Humor
Author: Paul Bailey
ISBN: 1841157597
Subcategory: Humor
Pages 192 pages
Publisher HarperCollins Publishers; UK ed. edition (July 7, 2003)
Language English
Category: Humor
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 193
ePUB size: 1424 kb
FB2 size: 1940 kb
DJVU size: 1664 kb
Other formats: docx lit mobi azw

eBook Uncle Rudolf download

by Paul Bailey


Uncle Rudolf Paul Bailey For Norman and Cella Manea Epigraph ‘A wand’ring minstrel I, A thing of shreds and . I woke up yesterday morning with the old words on my tongue

Uncle Rudolf Paul Bailey For Norman and Cella Manea Epigraph ‘A wand’ring minstrel I, A thing of shreds and patche. Sung by Nanki-Poo in The Mikado. I woke up yesterday morning with the old words on my tongue. There they were again, for the third time this year.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The haunting new novel from Paul Bailey, whose work has been short-listed twice for the Booker Prize. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far.

Uncle Rudolf - Paul Bailey. He showed me my healthy molars on a closed circuit television screen as proof. You have taken good care of yourself, Mr Peters. I did not tell him, or his wife, the hygienist who disposed of the plaque, that I had to thank Uncle Rudolf for my strong teeth. The story would have struck them as absurd.

Paul Bailey (born 16 February 1937) is a British novelist and critic, as well as a biographer of Cynthia Payne and Quentin Crisp. Paul Bailey attended Sir Walter St John's Grammar School For Boys in Battersea, London

Paul Bailey (born 16 February 1937) is a British novelist and critic, as well as a biographer of Cynthia Payne and Quentin Crisp. Paul Bailey attended Sir Walter St John's Grammar School For Boys in Battersea, London. He won a scholarship to the Central School of Speech and Drama in 1953 and worked as an actor between 1956 and 1964. He became a freelance writer in 1967.

Stevie Davies on Paul Bailey's beautifully understated fictional memoir of exile, Uncle Rudolf

Stevie Davies on Paul Bailey's beautifully understated fictional memoir of exile, Uncle Rudolf. The novel is suffused with a kind of fastidious tenderness, emanating from Uncle Rudolf. A heroic opera singer reduced to operetta vulgarities, Rudolf, seen through Andrew's young gaze, is himself cloven.

Название книги: Uncle Rudolf. But Uncle Rudolf’s furniture was of a kind I could not even dream of, and had no words to describe until I became the English nephew he wanted me to be. Although I was tired and confused, my eyes took in the vast sofa, the shining mahogany table, the chaise longue, the grand piano, the chandelier, and the paintings and drawings that covered every wall.

The haunting new novel from Paul Bailey, whose work has been short-listed twice for the Booker Prize.

In Uncle Rudolf, two-time Booker-Prize finalist Paul Bailey has crafted an exquisite, profoundly moving portrayal of a charismatic and popular performer in World War II-era Europe, and the orphaned nephew he takes under his wing. Seventy-year-old man Andre reflects back on his life, beginning with his Jewish childhood in Romania on the eve of World War II.

The haunting novel from Paul Bailey, whose work has been short-listed twice for the Booker Prize. At the age of seventy, Andrew Peters looks back across the years to remember life with his doting Uncle Rudolf, who rescued him from fascist Romania as a child. Vivid, often hilarious, stories of Rudolf’s brilliant but blighted singing career are intertwined with the slow unfolding of secrets that have shadowed Andrew’s otherwise happy life.

The haunting new novel from Paul Bailey, whose work has been short-listed twice for the Booker Prize.
Gavidor
Paul Bailey writes about past times and dead societies but he does it beautifully. He reminds me of Stefan Zweig and other great writers of the years between the two great World Wars. The characters in this novel are lovable, complex human beings obliged to live in a difficult time, sensitive men surrounded by barbarians. Their weaknesses are very human and we can easily understand why they do what they do.
The language is beautiful and the tension all along the narrative keeps going up to the very end.
A most interesting and entertaining book that deals delicately and elegantly with passion and feelings.
Bloodhammer
Not a patch on 'Gabriell's Lamet'
Cogelv
After reading Bailey's "Kitty and Virgil" and "Gabriel's Lament", I found this novel a total disappointment. I suppose it was intended to be charming and sad. To me, it was a slight book (in impact as well as length) which relies on interesting plot devices to make the story readable.
Malodor
Andrew Peterson was born Andrei Petrescu in Romania, and he tells his story at the age of 70. His maternal grandfather was Jewish, and that is enough to imperil the family in 1937 Romania when Codreanu, the founder of the antisemitic Iron Guard, was on the ascendant and violence was already on the rampage. Andrei's father decided to send his seven year old son to England to be looked after by his paternal uncle Rudolf Peterson (born Rudi Petrescu), who had made a name for himself there and in other European capitals as a singer in operettas. Rudolf had seen some time ago that how Romania was becoming increasingly fascist, had become a voluntary exile in London, and had urged his brother and sister-in-law - in vain - to leave "the beastly country" of their birth. (The miasma of antisemitism in Romania had not even disappeared when Andrew revisited his ancestral home after 1989.)

Andrew never saw his parents again, and though he was very comfortable with his beloved Uncle Rudolf in the day-time, his dreams at night were haunted by his absent parents. Rudolf loved his nephew dearly, worked hard to turn him into an Englishman, and tried to protect him from suffering - so it is not until Andrew is eighteen that he learnt of the fate of his parents.

Much of the book, as its title suggests, is a rich portrait of the uncle who was the key figure in Andrew's life: of his ambitions and disappointments, of his relationships with a number of women, of his generosity, of his charismatic, amusing and carefree exterior covering up a deeper melancholia, grief, anger and self-contempt. Back in the 1920s he had ignored the urging of his teachers (the historical figures of Jean de Reszke and Georges Enescu) to aim higher than operettas: he had the talent to become a famous singer in grand opera. In time - too late to change course - he had himself come to despise operettas, whose frivolity and easy sentimentalism had been so enjoyed in Vienna, Bucharest and Budapest "by those who brought about Europe's destruction".

The novel moves backwards and forwards in time. What happened to Andrew's parents is touched on several times; and the full story, when it comes near the end of the novel, is intensely moving.

A subtle story interweaving the personal, the cultural and the political.