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eBook Criminal Macabre download
Humor
Author: Ben Templesmith,Steve Niles
ISBN: 1840238739
Subcategory: Humor
Pages 144 pages
Publisher Titan Books Ltd (May 21, 2004)
Language English
Category: Humor
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 765
ePUB size: 1368 kb
FB2 size: 1115 kb
DJVU size: 1179 kb
Other formats: azw txt lit azw

eBook Criminal Macabre download

by Ben Templesmith,Steve Niles


In 2003 Steve Niles, creator of the 30 Days of Night comic series, launched a series of occult detective stories featuring the monstrously hard-boiled Cal McDonald. Book 1 of 2 in the Criminal Macabre Series.

In 2003 Steve Niles, creator of the 30 Days of Night comic series, launched a series of occult detective stories featuring the monstrously hard-boiled Cal McDonald. A pill-popping alcoholic reprobate.

Criminal Macabre: A Cal McDonald Mystery is a comic book series starring Cal McDonald, an antihero American comic book character created in 1990 by writer Steve Niles. The character's adventures have been published by Dark Horse Comics and later IDW Publishing. Cal himself is akin to John Constantine, a DC Comics paranormal detective. He takes illicit drugs, and befriends a network of ghouls to assist him in his cases. Policemen do not really care to be involved with Cal.

Steve Niles (born June 21, 1965) is an American comic book author and novelist, known for works such as 30 Days of Night, Criminal Macabre, Simon Dark, Mystery Society and Batman: Gotham County Line

Steve Niles (born June 21, 1965) is an American comic book author and novelist, known for works such as 30 Days of Night, Criminal Macabre, Simon Dark, Mystery Society and Batman: Gotham County Line.

Criminal Macabre book. steve niles is an awesome comic book artist, and this series was one of his best

Criminal Macabre book. steve niles is an awesome comic book artist, and this series was one of his best. Mar 10, 2012 Lucy Werner rated it really liked it.

Steve Niles has other Cal McDonald detective graphic novels if you venture around. As of yet although there does not appear to be a sequel to this comic at this time of writing (even though is on the side) there is obviously maybe a future Templesmith Niles Cal McDonald collaboration, however right now they are cooking up other themes to check out - "30 Days of Night" and "Dark Days". Ben Templesmith's art style doesn't work quite as well here in Niles' more strictly horrific "30 Days of Night," but it still conveys the story well enough and creates a suitably creepy mood. All things told, this was a great graphic novel and I can't wait for whatever Niles has next.

What others are saying. Horror Art by Ben Templesmith. W) Steve Niles (A/CA) Alison Sampson SERIES PREMIERE An American family traveling on vacation finds themselves stranded in a small town with a sinister secret

What others are saying. CRIMINAL MACABRE cover by Ben Templesmith. All Horror Movies Horror Art Horror Icons Horror Films Horror Posters Scary Movies Film Posters Comic Book Characters Comic Books Art. It's A Dan's World. W) Steve Niles (A/CA) Alison Sampson SERIES PREMIERE An American family traveling on vacation finds themselves stranded in a small town with a sinister secret. Summer Scares: 13 Horror Comics to Keep You Spooked Until Halloween. ComicList: The New Comic Book Releases List.

Город: Online store:Подписчиков: 24 ты. себе: Australo-American. Writer, artist, fashion designer, rider of the Squid. Made career out of Werewolf sodomy and dead fetus powered robots.

Steve Niles is the writer of the hit comic 30 Days of Night and the Cal McDonald horror/noir novels, Savage . Book in the Criminal Macabre: A Cal McDonald Mystery Series). by Ben Templesmith and Steve Niles.

Book in the Criminal Macabre: A Cal McDonald Mystery Series).

From acclaimed masters of the monstrous, Steve Niles and Ben Templesmith, comes a dark mystery, gas-bloated with black humour and blood-red action! Werewolves stealing. Vampires mugging. Ghouls beaten in their own sewers. A man murdered by monsters - with a letter opener. The connection? Private investigator Cal McDonald is damned (literally) if he knows. But, like a raging fever, the heat is building on Cal to come up with answers, and there'll be a lot more blood and sweat spilt before he can unveil the horrific truth! A witches' brew of crime noir and modern horror, and bristling with crackerjack humour, Criminal Macabre is the new must-read for any child of the Dark One!
Butius
Hellboy meets Magnum P.I. meets Army of Darkness with a dash of John Constantine (Hellblazer)

If optioned for a movie, I'd cast either Timothy Olyphant or Aaron Ekhardt as Cal McDonald and Steve Buscemi as Mo'lock
Nikojas
Private detective Cal McDonald is a magnet for the bizarre, the supernatural, and the creepy. His appearances in various comics are collected in this volume.

In "Hairball," Cal investigates some college kids who are bringing home parts from dismembered bodies. Cal encounters a friendly ghoul and decidedly unfriendly werewolves. Both Steve Niles' story and the art, by Casey Jones/Bruce Patterson, are fairly ordinary.

"Criminal Macabre: A Cal McDonald Mystery" starts as a vampire tale but evolves into a story about a variety of monsters and a plague and a dead etymologist. Monsters are in the tunnels, they're running the transit system, and they're making Cal's life hell. Niles injects humor into the story at exactly the right moments. Humor also permeates "Love Me Tenderloin", a story in which meat in a packing plant becomes animated by the spirit of a dead guy. Those two stories, and a lesser entry -- "A Letter from B.S.," about a dead guy who hires Cal to find his dead girlfriend -- feature very cool, edgy artwork by Ben Templesmith that often looks like photoshopped faces have been enhanced with an etch-a-sketch. Other panels look like cave drawings. Still others look like Picasso drew them after smoking some extra-strong reefer.

The art in the last two stories, by Kelley Jones, is less striking but more realistic, if drawings of demons can be called realistic. It doesn't blow me away like Templesmith's, but it does justice to the series. In "Last Train to Deadsville", Cal saves a town full of white trash from demons and fiends and a seriously hot babe. "Supernatural Freak Machine" finds Cal battling a possessed '73 Chevy Nova (or maybe he's just having a bad acid trip ... or both) before taking on a villain who makes Hannibal Lecter look like a girl scout. The story might be the goriest in the bunch but it's also the most poignant, contrasting Cal's sick humor with his very human, very broken heart.

A text story called "Savage Membrane" takes up quite a few pages but really, who buys a graphic novel to read a text story?

While I wasn't equally impressed with all the stories, I consistently admired Niles' writing style. He skillfully blends humor, horror, and noir. If I could, I would give this collection 4 1/2 stars.
Shakar
Hellboy meets Magnum P.I. meets Army of Darkness with a dash of John Constantine (Hellblazer)

If optioned for a movie, I'd cast either Timothy Olyphant or Aaron Ekhardt as Cal McDonald and Steve Buscemi as Mo'lock
TheJonnyTest
Private detective Cal McDonald is a magnet for the bizarre, the supernatural, and the creepy. His appearances in various comics are collected in this volume.

In "Hairball," Cal investigates some college kids who are bringing home parts from dismembered bodies. Cal encounters a friendly ghoul and decidedly unfriendly werewolves. Both Steve Niles' story and the art, by Casey Jones/Bruce Patterson, are fairly ordinary.

"Criminal Macabre: A Cal McDonald Mystery" starts as a vampire tale but evolves into a story about a variety of monsters and a plague and a dead etymologist. Monsters are in the tunnels, they're running the transit system, and they're making Cal's life hell. Niles injects humor into the story at exactly the right moments. Humor also permeates "Love Me Tenderloin", a story in which meat in a packing plant becomes animated by the spirit of a dead guy. Those two stories, and a lesser entry -- "A Letter from B.S.," about a dead guy who hires Cal to find his dead girlfriend -- feature very cool, edgy artwork by Ben Templesmith that often looks like photoshopped faces have been enhanced with an etch-a-sketch. Other panels look like cave drawings. Still others look like Picasso drew them after smoking some extra-strong reefer.

The art in the last two stories, by Kelley Jones, is less striking but more realistic, if drawings of demons can be called realistic. It doesn't blow me away like Templesmith's, but it does justice to the series. In "Last Train to Deadsville", Cal saves a town full of white trash from demons and fiends and a seriously hot babe. "Supernatural Freak Machine" finds Cal battling a possessed '73 Chevy Nova (or maybe he's just having a bad acid trip ... or both) before taking on a villain who makes Hannibal Lecter look like a girl scout. The story might be the goriest in the bunch but it's also the most poignant, contrasting Cal's sick humor with his very human, very broken heart.

A text story called "Savage Membrane" takes up quite a few pages but really, who buys a graphic novel to read a text story?

While I wasn't equally impressed with all the stories, I consistently admired Niles' writing style. He skillfully blends humor, horror, and noir. If I could, I would give this collection 4 1/2 stars.