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eBook The Fall download
Humor
Author: Albert Camus
ISBN: 0394424247
Subcategory: Humor
Pages 148 pages
Publisher Knopf (June 15, 1957)
Language English
Category: Humor
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 878
ePUB size: 1918 kb
FB2 size: 1566 kb
DJVU size: 1459 kb
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eBook The Fall download

by Albert Camus


The fall/Albert Camus; translated from the French by Justin. Other Books by This Author.

The fall/Albert Camus; translated from the French by Justin. Some were dreadfully insulted, and quite seriously, to have held up as a model such an immoral character as A Hero of Our Time; others shrewdly noticed that the author had portrayed himself and his acquaintances.

The Fall (French: La Chute) is a philosophical novel by Albert Camus. First published in 1956, it is his last complete work of fiction. Set in Amsterdam, The Fall consists of a series of dramatic monologues by the self-proclaimed "judge-penitent" Jean-Baptiste Clamence, as he reflects upon his life to a stranger. In what amounts to a confession, Clamence tells of his success as a wealthy Parisian defense lawyer who was highly respected by his colleagues.

Albert Camus — The Fall. Some were dreadfully insulted, and quite seriously, to have held up as a model such an immoral character as A Hero of Our T i me; others shrewdly noticed that the author had portrayed himself and his acquaintances

Albert Camus — The Fall. Some were dreadfully insulted, and quite seriously, to have held up as a model such an immoral character as A Hero of Our T i me; others shrewdly noticed that the author had portrayed himself and his acquaintances. A H e r o o f O u r T i m e, gentlemen, is in fact a portrait, but not of an individual; it is the aggregate of the vices of our whole generation in their fullest expression. 3. Albert Camus — The Fall.

In a eulogy to Albert Camus, existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre described the novel as "perhaps the most beautiful and the least understood" of Camus' books.

Albert Camus (1913-60) is the author of a number of best-selling and highly influential works, all of which are published by Penguin. They include The Fall, The Outsider and The First Man. Awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957, Camus is remembered as one of the few writers to have shaped the intellectual climate of post-war France, but beyond that, his fame has been international. An irresistibly brilliant examination of modern conscience' The New York Times

The Fall by Albert Camus is a short, disturbing work about the "fallen" life of Jean-Baptiste Clamence, the narrator of the story.

The Fall by Albert Camus is a short, disturbing work about the "fallen" life of Jean-Baptiste Clamence, the narrator of the story. The entire work is actually Clamence's own narrative, which makes reading it more like listening to a type of confession; at the very least it is like being on the recieving end of a conversation. As the title indicates, this books plays off of Christian themes heavily.

Albert Camus’ The Fall is not so much a narrative, as it is a set of monologues - or maybe one long monologues divided into different times and geographies, which originate in the novel’s protagonist, Clamence.

Albert Camus’ The Fall is not so much a narrative, as it is a set of monologues - or maybe one long monologues divided into different times and geographies, which originate in the novel’s protagonist, Clamence, and are directed at an invisible listener - maybe the readers themselves. It begins in a bar at the centre of Amsterdam, called Mexico City - an actual bar at the time this novel was published, in which Clamence finds a willing listener.

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The Fall (1956), La Chute in the original French, is Albert Camus’s last completed novel, and one of his most challenging

The Fall (1956), La Chute in the original French, is Albert Camus’s last completed novel, and one of his most challenging. In the fog of Amsterdam, Jean-Baptiste Clamence meets an unnamed stranger in a small bar and, falling into a solipsistic monologue, begins to tell the story of his own personal fall. Clamence claims that he was once, like the narratee, a magistrate in Paris, where he lived a fine and self-satisfied life, believing himself a model citizen.

A man's confessions reveal his perception of justice and his own downfall
Vetitc
Listen here you bastards, this print looks like a 10 year old made it in school. The typography is garbage, and the whole book looks like a cheap little turd. It's impossible to read because the print is so small, I'm assuming to save on paper costs, but that's bulls*** because the margins are terribly set. I'm 24 with good eyesight and I can't read this book, looks like it has windows 99 "arial" font. I'll get back to you when I get a microscope for further study.
I was gonna gripe to the publisher, or the person who made it, but there's no information in here at all. This is a bootleg of a real book.
Mitynarit
"The Fall" is a novel, which tells the story of Jean-Baptiste Clamence, a judge residing in Amsterdam. Throughout "The Fall" the reader witnesses Clamence turn from a respected Parisian lawyer and champion of noble causes, into a man whose history haunts him around every turn. Essentially, the reader witnesses a good mans progress thwarted by blemishes of his past.

The central idea behind this novel is to show the reader that they mustn't draw conclusions on those around them, because everyone has faults and blemishes of their own.

Meanwhile, the progression of "The Fall" is rapidly thrown at you through dense and often times vague sequences of events, which, explores the themes of innocence, non-existence, and truth.

The most interesting aspect of "The Fall" was Camus's ability to make the reader into a character in the novel, he does this through the perspective of second person, yet he used a first person present tense. In doing so, Jean-Baptise Clamence is directly talking to the reader.

In short, "The Fall" is something that I recommend to people who are looking for a literary challenge of sorts. I say this because the book is far from a page turner, there are times often within the first 60 pages where you will wonder why you are reading such a book, however, if you finish the novel it will leave you thinking way after the last sentence. I give it 4 out of 5 stars.
lucky kitten
Excellent read, beautiful prose but it's also pretty dense. As short as it is, it still takes some time to get through because it's tough to absorb more than 20-30 pages at a time. Some brilliant quotes though. "The lowest man in the social scale still has his wife or his child. If he’s unmarried, a dog. The essential thing, after all, is being able to get angry with someone who has no right to talk back." I personally enjoyed Camus' novels better such as "The Stranger" and "The Plague."
BroWelm
Great essay on the vanity embedded at the core of the human and how even after a very thorough trip of self discovery a person can still manage to put himself before others as a means of self idealization.... I realized I am rotten, but having the realization makes me better than you who have not even realized it....
Felhann
As others have stated so far this is an interesting and deep novel, one that drags you into its questionable and illusory narration through the use of the first person monologue. With this in mind, the novel becomes necessarily more complex and demands the reader's attention at all times. Nothing should be taken for granted - not the speaker's ideologies, professed history, and certainly not the way in which he is talking to another character. The manner in which the tone and companionship moves throughout the novel is as important as anything else - do not for a second fall into the persistent trap of thinking that Monsieur Clamence is speaking to you, the reader.

The novel requires no extensive knowledge of philosophic topics in order to be appreciated, however, having that knowledge will only enrich the experience. Anyone with an interest in ethics, social roles, confession or simple artistic capability will enjoy this short, but dense novel.

On a final note, the novel presents a startling insight into the nature and power of confession, which is ultimately what Clamence is performing (reliable or not). Foucault's the History of Sexuality Part 1 speaks to this matter, one which is every bit as pertinent to the content and experience of *The Fall* as is any other philosophic or artistic reference, and one that is consistently relevant.
MrRipper
This is not reflection on the book. This is a home-produced photocopy. The print is grey, and almost illegible. It is a cheaply produced knock-off with no publishing information on the inside cover.
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
Camus was writing soon after WWll: much of this novel is referencing that horrific event, so there is an historical perspective to take into consideration.
However, universal truths are present and the narrator is vividly real and contemporary and the writing powerful.
One reads Camus for the lucidity of the absurd.