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History
Author: Julia Epstein
ISBN: 0252024389
Subcategory: World
Pages 256 pages
Publisher University of Illinois Press (April 9, 2001)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 194
ePUB size: 1974 kb
FB2 size: 1735 kb
DJVU size: 1956 kb
Other formats: lrf txt doc mbr

eBook Shaping Losses: CULTURAL MEMORY AND THE HOLOCAUST download

by Julia Epstein


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Contributors discuss artistic efforts to "preserve the rawness" of memory, to resist redemptive closure in Holocaust narratives and public memorials, and to prevent the Holocaust from being sealed in "the cold storage of history. Epstein and Lefkovitz have collected an admirable mix of essays on Holocaust memory that are critically honest, intensely personal, and courageously reflective about the scope and meaning of unbearable tragedy.

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Choose file format of this book to download . X, 239 S. : Ill. ;, 23 cm. Personal Name: Epstein, Julia Hrsg.

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Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Cultural Memory Studies: An Introduction. In Cultural Memory Studies: An International and Interdisciplinary Handbook, ed. Astrid Erll, Ansgar Nünning, and Sara B. Young, 1–15. New York: Walter de Gruyter. Facing History Facing Ourselves.

This eloquent volume examines how memoirs, films, photographs, art, and literature, as well as family conversations and personal remembrances, embody the impulse to preserve what is destroyed.

Purchase and read your book immediately

Purchase and read your book immediately. The Holocaust took place far from the United States and involved few Americans, yet rather than receding, this event has assumed a greater significance in the American consciousness with the passage of time.

More urgently and passionately, those of us working on memory and transmission have argued over the ethics and the aesthetics of remembrance in the aftermath of catastrophe

More urgently and passionately, those of us working on memory and transmission have argued over the ethics and the aesthetics of remembrance in the aftermath of catastrophe. How, in our present, do we regard and recall what Susan Sontag (2003) has so powerfully described as the pain of others? What do we owe the victims? How can we best carry their stories forward without appropriating them, without unduly calling attention to ourselves, and without, in turn, having our own stories dis-placed by them? How are we implicated in the crimes? Can the memory of genocide be transformed into action.

Shaping Losses explores how traumatic loss affects identity and how those who are shaped by loss give shape, in turn, to the empty place where something--relationships, family, culture--was and is no longer. Taking the example of the decimation of European Jewry during the Nazi era, Shaping Losses confronts the problem of transforming trauma into cultural memory.   This eloquent volume examines how memoirs, films, photographs, art, and literature, as well as family conversations and personal remembrances, embody the impulse to preserve what is destroyed. The contributors -- all distinguished women scholars, most of them survivors or daughters of survivors--examine classic memorializations such as Claude Lanzmann's film Shoah and Roman Vishniac's photographs of prewar Jews as well as several less-well-known works. They also address ways in which children of survivors of the Holocaust--and of other catastrophic traumas--struggle with inherited or vicarious memory, striving to come to terms with losses that centrally define them although they experience them only indirectly.  Shaping Losses considers the limitations of Holocaust representations and testimonies that capture shards of the experience but are necessarily selective and reductive. Contributors discuss artistic efforts to "preserve the rawness" of memory, to resist redemptive closure in Holocaust narratives and public memorials, and to prevent the Holocaust from being sealed in "the cold storage of history." The authors probe the nature of memory and of trauma, studying the use of language within and outside a traumatic context such as Auschwitz and pinpointing the qualities that make traumatic memory ineffable, untransmittable, and perhaps unreliable. Within the "haunted terrain of traumatized memory" that all Holocaust testimonies inhabit, the impulse to give form to emptiness--to shape loss--emerges as a necessary betrayal, a vital effort to bridge the gap between history and memory.