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History
Author: Robert Blair Kaiser
ISBN: 0826413846
Subcategory: World
Pages 304 pages
Publisher Continuum; F First Edition, First Printing Used edition (March 11, 2002)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 499
ePUB size: 1651 kb
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eBook Clerical Error: A True Story (Handbooks of Catholic Theology) download

by Robert Blair Kaiser


Robert Blair Kaiser, who brilliantly made his mark as the principal Time correspondent covering the First Session of the Second Vatican Council (Vatican II), describes his memoir as coming-of-age stories, his own and that of the Catholic Church at Vatican II. Sadly, as much a. .

Robert Blair Kaiser, who brilliantly made his mark as the principal Time correspondent covering the First Session of the Second Vatican Council (Vatican II), describes his memoir as coming-of-age stories, his own and that of the Catholic Church at Vatican II. Sadly, as much as Kaiser has grown up, and moved on with his life despite personal tragedy, the institutional Church might be characterized as stuck in arrested development, still mired in sexual scandals that have bankrupted dioceses and tarnished the image of the priesthood and religious life.

Robert Blair Kaiser is the author of 8 books. Clerical Error: A True Story Handbooks of Catholic Theology. He currently writes for Newsweek from Rome, where he also pens his periodical e-mail letters on the Vatican, which are enjoyed by thousands of persons around the world.

Find sources: "Robert Blair Kaiser" – news · newspapers · books · scholar . From 1981 until 1983, Kaiser was the Chairman of the University of Nevada's Journalism Department in Reno. Clerical Error: A True Story (2002).

Find sources: "Robert Blair Kaiser" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (May 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Contents.

The memoirs of Robert Blair Kaiser's teens and twenties in the Jesuits, and of his early thirties as a star correspondent at Vatican II. Twenty -nine years old, newly married, and fresh from the Society of Jesus, where he had spent ten years as a novice and scholastic, Bob Kaiser was picked as "Time" reporter at the Second Vatican Council. Much of inner story of the Council - its personalities, machinations, maneuverings between progressive forces and the old guard - was told in Bob Kaiser's book of the early sixties "Pope, Council, and World".

A True Story (Handbooks of Catholic Theology). by Robert Blair Kaiser. Published April 2002 by Continuum International Publishing Group.

Informationen zum Titel Clerical Error von Robert Blair Kaiser aus der Reihe Handbooks of Catholic Theology [mit Kurzbeschreibung und . Clerical Error A True Story (Handbooks of Catholic Theology). Handbooks of Catholic Theology.

Informationen zum Titel Clerical Error von Robert Blair Kaiser aus der Reihe Handbooks of Catholic Theology Clerical Error A True Story (Handbooks of Catholic Theology).

The Times of London withheld the unfortunate cleric's name but. reported that he held a curacy in a "prosperous London suburb. A pretty female parishioner had made her interest in the handsome curate quite plain but seeing that he would not bend, she asked, before they parted forever, could she have one kiss?

Recommend this journal.

Recommend this journal. Volume 29, Issue 2. Fall 2002, pp. 373-374. Clerical Error: A True Story. New York: Continuum, 2002.

Journalist and inveterate church lover and critic Robert Blair Kaiser died April 2, Holy . Four decades after the episode, he wrote about it in a personal book called Clerical Error.

Journalist and inveterate church lover and critic Robert Blair Kaiser died April 2, Holy Thursday, at the age of 84 in a hospice center in Phoenix, with daughter, sons, and grandchildren at his bedside. Janet Hauter, co-chair of the American Catholic Council, a church reform group, wrote in a newsletter that Kaiser was "a courageous man with the biggest heart of any (church) reformer I ever met; he was dauntless in pushing, prodding and confronting injustice in the church. A half-dozen of his books were to focus on the post-conciliar church and the council's unfulfilled vision of church.

Twenty-nine years old, newly married, and fresh from the Society of Jesus, where he had spent ten years as a novice and scholastic, Bob Kaiser was picked for one of the most exciting jobs in journalism of his era: Time's reporter at the Second Vatican Council. In the words of Michael Novak: "No reporter knew more about the Council; had talked with more of the personalities, prominent or minor; had more sources of information to tap. Sunday evening dinner parties at his apartment became a rendezvous of stimulating and informed persons. In the English-speaking world, at least, perhaps no source was to have quite the catalytic effect as Time on opinion outside the Council and even to an extent within it." Much of inner story of the Council-its personalities, machinations, maneuverings between progressive forces and the old guard-was told in Bob Kaiser's bestseller of the early sixties Pope, Council, and World. This is a different story, one so raw and personal that it could only be told some forty years later in a very different church and by a much matured Bob Kaiser. The heart of the story is how Bob's wife was seduced by his friend, the Jesuit priest Malachy Martin, and how Martin ("a man who could make people laugh in seven languages)" persuaded Kaiser's other clerical friends (including notable bishops and prominent theologians) to send him to a sanitorium. The story is at once hilarious (Martin was one of the great clerical con men of all time) and sobering. The "clerical error"--the refusal to see what Martin was up to--was as much Kaiser's as that of his older clerical friends who defended their fellow priest simply because he was a member of the club. Their naivete and their blindness only mirrors the church's inability to deal realistically with any issue touched by sex: birth control, remarriage after divorce, priestly celibacy, clerical child abuse, or the ordination of women. Bob Kaiser did eventually grow up. He knows the official church has a long way to go.

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Robert Blair Kaiser, who brilliantly made his mark as the principal Time correspondent covering the First Session of the Second Vatican Council (Vatican II), describes his memoir as coming-of-age stories, his own and that of the Catholic Church at Vatican II. Sadly, as much as Kaiser has grown up, and moved on with his life despite personal tragedy, the institutional Church might be characterized as stuck in arrested development, still mired in sexual scandals that have bankrupted dioceses and tarnished the image of the priesthood and religious life. This book directs trenchant criticism of the Church on matters of sexuality.

The first two parts of Kaiser's book take enjoyable excursions, first through the life of a Jesuit novice and scholastic in the 1950s--considerably different, I can tell you, from my experience as a Jesuit novice in the early 1980s. Kaiser was a Jesuit for ten years, leaving before being ordained a priest. He describes what it was like to undergo Jesuit formation in the years before Vatican II, some of his experiences being quite humorous, and some of them darkly foreshadowing later crises. The second part of the book details Kaiser's post-Jesuit foray into journalism, eventually leading him to Rome as a Time correspondent just as Vatican II is called. Kaiser's religious background, social skills, and curiosity prepare him well to deliver the inside story of Vatican II to readers in the United States and United Kingdom; only The New Yorker's pseudonymous Xavier Rynne (Francis X. Murphy) had as much if not greater impact on the English-speaking world's encountering the revolutionary spirit of the Council.

The third and greater part of the book tragically recounts the dissolution of Kaiser's marriage. As Kaiser becomes increasingly absorbed with the Council and with his related personal successes (his book on the Council wins high acclaim), and so abandoning his young family for days and weeks at a time, his wife Mary turns to one of his friends, the Jesuit priest Malachi Martin, for solace and companionship. In time, Kaiser begins to suspect that Mary and Martin are having a sexual relationship. Some of Kaiser's other friends, however, feel that Kaiser is paranoid, that he has been overworking and is losing his grip on reality. They go so far as to direct Kaiser to a psychiatric hospital for evaluation. In time, Kaiser (who, as the narrative makes clear, has his own moral failings) finds evidence that Mary has been using birth control pills during his long absences; later he obtains copies of Martin's scandalous letters to his wife. He is finally vindicated when Martin's superiors begin to accept, all too late, Martin's culpability in the affair.

If this sounds like a pot boiler, it certainly reads like one. The emotions are raw, and Kaiser's actions almost vindictive. (Mary, who is as culpable, fares better than Martin.) Indeed, if not for Kaiser's impeccable credentials as a journalist, and the independently raised concerns about Martin's morals and ethics in other situations, one might be tempted to shrug off this account as simply Kaiser's biased personal perspective at best and fantasy at worst. Kaiser's story rings all too true to let Martin and, for that matter, those who protected him, off the hook.

Apart from this sordid affair, Kaiser's account raises troubling questions about the institutional Church's ability to grapple reasonably and effectively with matters involving sexuality. From the tragic and harmful effects of repressed sexuality among some clergy and religious to its controversial handling of the birth control issue in the 1960s the institutional Church has been desperate to uphold its bulwark of moral certitude in matters of sexuality. Meanwhile, for decades, the People of God have largely been drifting from a Church that has been prone to just say "No" on most matters of sexuality while appearing widely and flagrantly hypocritical when it comes to the sexual failings of the clergy and religious.

In Kaiser's view, the institutional Church discourages the People of God from thinking for itself. It was his ability to recognize that for himself that allowed Kaiser to finally grow up. (The reader notes with caution, though, that Kaiser's view of women in this book has usually to do with their sexual attributes and not much more. This does a disservice to his claim.) But encouraging the People of God to think for themselves is only half the answer (and is happening anyway, with deleterious effect as far as religion is concerned); the other, more difficult challenge ahead for the Church is moving towards a more positive embracing of sexuality, to become a Church that says "Yes" on matters of sexuality and of love in a healthy and responsible environment. Ultimately this will mean deeply reexamining, in the light of contemporary science and the actual, lived experiences of heterosexual and homosexual men and women, basic questions about sexual orientation, sexual behaviors, and marriage and sexual expression in the context of faith and morality. The Church will also need to review current proscriptions that currently serve as barriers to people's exercising their faith in the context of the Church. Finally, the Church will need to do a better job at communicating its message, following up on positive statements made by Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI.
Inabel
While in many ways this is a fascinating book, it will appeal most to those interested in the Catholic Church’s Vatican II and/or to those who lived/live in religious community.

Kaiser offers a privileged insight into the political and interpersonal dimensions to that historic Vatican II Council. He knew anyone who was anyone in those heady days of Church reform.

The book, though, is also an accounting first of his time as a member of the religious order of Jesuits and then later (after he left the Order) of how a famed nefarious Jesuit sabotaged his marriage. This drama is tragic and reads at times like a soap opera – once again proving that life is stranger than fiction!

The real poignancy to the story, though, is Kaiser’s journey from Jesuit to husband and father to crusading journalist all the while struggling to understand what it means to be an “adult” – a man with a voice of his own. His story makes vivid the all-too-common cruelty of how religious life, as known in the Catholic Church, can infantilize its priests.

Without intending to, Kaiser actually offers insight into how the horrors of sex abuse could go un-remediated in the Church. And his accounting of Vatican Council II also offers insight into the still lingering hierarchical feuds that currently rack St. Peter’s.
Jark
The actual book is terrible . condition of the book good enough.
Vrion
Clerical Error is a very interesting book. There is not a single Catholic interested in Vatican II that would not love it. Kaiser either met or knew every person of note involved in Vatican II.
He tells all about himself as a young pre-Vat II husband and he admits to being somewhat less than noteworthy. Indeed, he was a wretch. His knowledge of how to love and how to show love to the beloved was sorely lacking. He was pitiful. He does not deny this fact. It is no wonder that his wife, Mary, took up with the odios priest, Fr. Malachy.
Kaiser was undeniably naive. He was also undeniably self-confident and cocky. His note-worthy friends were equally naive regarding the feminine gender. How pitiable it is to realize that men such as they rule the Catholic Church and they are the ones who make the rules for the rest of us to live by. What a farce. They preach as though they know the mind of God. Yet, they know nothing of love, in depth love, intimate love. And they do not even realize that they know nothing except what they read. How scary that is!
I do not know how much Kaiser has learned over the ensuiing years. I would enjoy discussing his present beliefs
regarding love and marriage with him.
from earth
Svengali, Rasputin, Martin. If what Mr. Kaiser says in this book is true, then it's too bad that Malachi (why does Kaiser spell it Malachy?) Martin died before INTERPOL, and whatever other law enforcement agencies should be interested, got to him.

I'm not Catholic and I don't think the story in Mr. Kaiser's book is Vatican II at all. The story is about a master con-man and even a cult master of international proportions.

Malachi Martin is connected so much like a spider to so many people and "things" that someone ought to do a really IN DEPTH rundown on the man. I live in a little, out-of-the-way midwestern state, I'm not Catholic, and even I know of people connected in a bizarre, almost cult-like way to Martin and perhaps a mysterious, grissly, unsolved murder or two.

I don't think that Martin was incapable of it, assuming that what Mr. Kaiser says in this book is indeed "a true story."
Ericaz
Riveting!