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History
Author: Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis
ISBN: 1580233759
Subcategory: World
Pages 160 pages
Publisher Jewish Lights; 1 edition (September 15, 2008)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 627
ePUB size: 1840 kb
FB2 size: 1858 kb
DJVU size: 1280 kb
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eBook Conscience: The Duty to Obey and the Duty to Disobey download

by Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis


Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis, one of the most respected spiritual leaders and teachers of his generation, has been a rabbi at Valley Beth Shalom in Encino, California, for close to forty years

Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis, one of the most respected spiritual leaders and teachers of his generation, has been a rabbi at Valley Beth Shalom in Encino, California, for close to forty years. He is the founding chairman of the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, an organization that identifies and offers grants to those non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews threatened by the agents of Nazi savagery. He is also the founder of Jewish World Watch, which aims to raise moral consciousness within the Jewish community.

by Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis. Books related to Conscience: The Duty to Obey and the Duty to Disobey. From Abraham to Abu Ghraib, from the dissenting prophets to Darfur, Rabbi Harold Schulweis probes history, the Bible and the works of contemporary thinkers for ideas about both critical disobedience and uncritical obedience. By questioning religions capacityand willto break from mindless conformity, Rabbi Schulweis challenges us to counter our current suppressive culture of obedience with the culture of moral compassion, and to fulfill religions obligation to make room for and carry out courageous moral dissent.

Conscience: The Duty to Obey and the Duty to Disobey, (2008). a b Tom Tugend, "Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis, ‘Rabbi of Rabbis’ and world-renowned Jewish leader, dies at 89", Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles, December 18, 2014. Uncomfortable Questions for Comfortable Jews, Meir Kahane, p. 40. ^ Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis Biography from Valley Beth Shalom Archived 2006-10-25 at the Wayback Machine. Springfield Nuclear Power Plant:Episodes:8F05 Archived 2012-09-09 at Archive.

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Jewish Lights (2008). Similar books and articles. Theological Implications of the Shoah: Caesura and Continuum as Hermeneutic Paradigms of Jewish Theodicy. From Abraham to Abu Ghraib, from the dissenting prophets to Darfur, he probes history, the Bible and the works of contemporary thinkers for ideas about both. Conscience Judaism Obedience Judaism Prayer Judaism Faith (Judaism Jewish ethics.

Rabbi Harold Schulweis is one of the greatest living rabbis. His insights on human behavior, morality and G-d are valuable for Jew and Gentile alike. This slim book is a pleasure to read. I am privileged to call him my rabbi and have a signed copy of his great book. Teen and Young Adult. Literature & Fiction. Mystery & Thriller.

Rabbi Harold M. Rabbi Harold Schulweis argues that Judaism accepts a type of morality that transcends the Torah’s laws, and indeed mandates that the Jew set aside the law when a greater morality is at stake. National Jewish Book Awards Winner 2008. Jewish Lights Publishing, 2009. Using examples such as Abraham, he shows that biblical prophets stood up to God, when they felt that His actions were unjust. The author carries his assertions about higher levels of morality to other arenas, including contemporary issues of Jewish life and examples of those who disobeyed human laws, such as those who rescued Jews during the Holocaust.

From Abraham to Abu Ghraib, from the dissenting prophets to Darfur, Rabbi Harold Schulweis probes history, the Bible and the works of contemporary thinkers for ideas about both critical disobedience and uncritical obedience. By questioning religion's capacity-­and will-­to break from mindless conformity, Rabbi Schulweis challenges us to counter our current suppressive culture of obedience with the culture of moral compassion, and to fulfill religion's obligation to make room for and carry out courageous moral dissent.

American rabbi and theologian. For Moses, that God should "visit the iniquity of the fathers upon the children to the third and fourth generation" (Exod. The God of the sages does not merely ordain; God also listens. 20:5) is an unacceptable form of group punishment akin to the morally indiscriminate punishment of Sodom. Challenging God's pronouncement of the punishment of the sons for the sins of the fathers, Moses argues with God, against God, and in the name of God. Moses engages God with fierce moral logic

In 1986, Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis established The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous (JFR) to fulfill the traditional Jewish commitment to hakarat hatov . Conscience: The Duty to Obey and the Duty to Disobey, (2008). We Dare Not Murder Memories of Genocide.

To this end, the JFR is committed to assisting those Righteous Gentiles who are in need. They are often reluctant to ask for help; they acted without expecting reward then or now. However, as Rabbi Schulweis realized, it is our duty to honor and support them. The JFR started out funding eight rescuers, and that number quickly grew, reaching 1,750.

A Profound and Stirring Call to Action in Our Troubled World―from One of America's Great Religious Leaders

"Conscience may be understood as the hidden inner compass that guides our lives and must be searched for and recovered repeatedly. At no time more than our own is this need to retrieve the shards of broken conscience more urgent."―from the Introduction

This clarion call to rethink our moral and political behavior examines the idea of conscience and the role conscience plays in our relationships to government, law, ethics, religion, human nature and God―and to each other. From Abraham to Abu Ghraib, from the dissenting prophets to Darfur, Rabbi Harold Schulweis probes history, the Bible and the works of contemporary thinkers for ideas about both critical disobedience and uncritical obedience. He illuminates the potential for evil and the potential for good that rests within us as individuals and as a society.

By questioning religion's capacity―and will―to break from mindless conformity, Rabbi Schulweis challenges us to counter our current suppressive culture of obedience with the culture of moral compassion, and to fulfill religion's obligation to make room for and carry out courageous moral dissent.

Bloodhammer
Drawing on Scripture, Talmud, history and literature, Rabbi Harold Schulweis has written a short book that celebrates the role of conscience as the essence of religion -- both in Judaism, specifically and religion, generally.

Highly readable with short chapters and "pull quotes" (those boxes with a quotation from the text set in the margin of a page), the book seems designed for faith-based study groups in synagogues. Schulweis writes very clearly and uses quotations thoughtfully -- even a group with people of different ages and from very different walks of life would be able to read it together easily.

Schulweis argues emphatically against a literal reading of Scripture. Specifically, he shows how Judaism has a rich tradition of reading the Bible that is willing to challenge even the words on the page in the name of the values that God stands for. Even explicit laws can be retired in the name of deeper principles.

The challenge for faithful people, he argues, is to seek to live under the direction of those deeper principles, and to build a world that is based upon them.

It is a good book, but not a great one. Simply, it is too short, and it leaves the reader wanting more...actually, a little too much more.

Nevertheless, fans of Schulweis' work, especially the magnificent "For Those Who Can't Believe," will be glad to have another useful, thought provoking volume to add to their libraries.
Samugul
This is a serious discussion on Jewish attitudes toward obeying and disobeying Torah commandments. It covers the bases very thoroughly and without any particular bias. It's eclectic and well documented. Best of all, it's clear and concise. However, it doesn't offer any fresh point of view or much in the way of modern viewpoints. If your looking for a survey of attitudes, this does the job. If you are looking for guidelines for spiritual actions, this is the wrong book.
Mustard Forgotten
If you just wish to know simple straightforward halakha (Jewish law) then don't bother with this book. If you wish to see ways that conscience can play a role then read this book. It draws from traditional Jewish sources as well as others. It is a bit too short and I wished the early sections were more fleshed out. Still, definitely worth reading if this subject interests you.
Bloodray
Rabbi Harold Schulweis is one of the greatest living rabbis. His insights on human behavior, morality and G-d are valuable for Jew and Gentile alike. This slim book is a pleasure to read. I am privileged to call him my rabbi and have a signed copy of his great book.