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eBook Buddhist Teaching in India (Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism) download
History
Author: Johannes Bronkhorst
ISBN: 0861715667
Subcategory: World
Pages 264 pages
Publisher Wisdom Publications; 1st edition (December 22, 2009)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 362
ePUB size: 1299 kb
FB2 size: 1541 kb
DJVU size: 1267 kb
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eBook Buddhist Teaching in India (Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism) download

by Johannes Bronkhorst


Johannes Bronkhorst's Buddhist Teaching in India is a most welcome addition to the growing literature on early Indian Buddhism. Its structure is clear and precise, and the text is thorough, highly readable, and accurate

Johannes Bronkhorst's Buddhist Teaching in India is a most welcome addition to the growing literature on early Indian Buddhism. Its structure is clear and precise, and the text is thorough, highly readable, and accurate. It will have useful application for both scholars and students and can easily be incorporated into classroom us. (Charles Prebish, Redd Chair in Religious Studies, Utah State University, and co-author of Introducing Buddhism).

The decline of Buddhism in the Indian subcontinent refers to a gradual process of dwindling and replacement of Buddhism in India, which ended around the 12th century

The decline of Buddhism in the Indian subcontinent refers to a gradual process of dwindling and replacement of Buddhism in India, which ended around the 12th century. According to Lars Fogelin, this was "not a singular event, with a singular cause; it was a centuries-long process.

Johannes Bronkhorst here tracks the development of Buddhist . Buddhist Teaching in India Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism.

Johannes Bronkhorst here tracks the development of Buddhist teachings both within the larger Indian context and among Buddhism's many schools, shedding light on the sources and trajectory of such ideas as dharma theory, emptiness, the bodhisattva ideal, buddha nature, formal logic, and idealism. Библиографические данные.

Buddhist Teaching in India book. Buddhist Teaching in India (Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism). by. Johannes Bronkhorst. The earliest records we have today of what the Buddha said were written down several centuries after his death, and the body of teachings attributed to him continued to evolve in India for centuries afterward across a shifting cultural and political landscape.

Tibetan Buddhism (also Indo-Tibetan Buddhism) is the form of Buddhism practiced in Tibet where it is the dominant religion. It is also found in the regions surrounding the Himalayas (such as Bhutan, Ladakh, and Sikkim), much of Chinese Central Asia,. It is also found in the regions surrounding the Himalayas (such as Bhutan, Ladakh, and Sikkim), much of Chinese Central Asia, the Southern Siberian regions such as Tuva, as well as Mongolia. Tibetan Buddhism is a form of Mahayana Buddhism stemming from the latest stages of Indian Buddhism (and so is also part of the tantric Vajrayana tradition).

by Johannes Bronkhorst. series Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. Books related to Buddhist Teaching in India. Johannes Bronkhorst here tracks the development of Buddhist teachings both within the larger Indian context and among Buddhism's many schools, shedding light on the sources and trajectory of such ideas as dharma theory, emptiness, the bodhisattva ideal, buddha nature, formal logic, and idealism.

Over time, Tibetan Buddhism developed to become a major force not just in. .They decided to hold a large debate between an Indian monk and a Chinese monk, to see which tradition the Tibetans should adopt.

Over time, Tibetan Buddhism developed to become a major force not just in Tibet, but throughout the Himalayas, Mongolia, and China. This article is a brief introduction to the history of Buddhism in Tibet, its early development, and how the four main schools came about. More teachers were sent to study in India, and other teachers came from India to teach in Tibet.

After initial studies of Mathematics and Physics with Astronomy at the Free University in Amsterdam (Kandidaats/B. in 1968), Johannes Bronkhorst took up the study of Sanskrit and Pali, first at the University of Rajasthan (Jaipur, India), then at the University of Pune (India). In Pune he obtained an .

Series: Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Series: Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. File: PDF, . 3 MB. Читать онлайн. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The unbinding of Isaac : a phenomenological midrash of Genesis 22.

Chronology of Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. ter of the Tibetan Buddhist exile community in India and the home of the. Dalai Lama. Lexicon of Buddhist Terms krit Glossary Select Bibliography Indexes. Technical Terms Proper Names Titles of Works Mentioned Locations.

The earliest records we have today of what the Buddha said were written down several centuries after his death, and the body of teachings attributed to him continued to evolve in India for centuries afterward across a shifting cultural and political landscape. As one tradition within a diverse religious milieu that included even the Greek kingdoms of northwestern India, Buddhism had many opportunities to both influence and be influenced by competing schools of thought. Even within Buddhism, a proliferation of interpretive traditions produced a dynamic intellectual climate. Johannes Bronkhorst here tracks the development of Buddhist teachings both within the larger Indian context and among Buddhism's many schools, shedding light on the sources and trajectory of such ideas as dharma theory, emptiness, the bodhisattva ideal, buddha nature, formal logic, and idealism. In these pages, we discover the roots of the doctrinal debates that have animated the Buddhist tradition up until the present day.
Alsardin
This book is a first rate study of the earliest structuring of the Buddha's teachings. This is a foundational book, but a scholarly work best approached with a basic understanding of Buddhism and Buddhist terminology. It discusses dharmas, the building blocks of Buddhism, the stages of meditation, the Jhanas as higher mental consciousness, the four noble truths, the importance of the concept of anatta or not self, and emptiness as developed through Theravadin and Mahayana teachings. It gives the reader the basic goals of understanding necessary along the path. And where does this path begin and end? "It is without origin and end, uncreated and unchanging, and has not entered existence at all. It is unthinkable, imponderable, immeasureable, unaccountable, and without equal......" at page 131. Reading this book over a period of a month, there were points where it was necessary to stop and re-read, reflect and meditate. When you decide you're serious and want to go beyond the many popular books now available on Buddhism you're ready to read and savor this book.
Clandratha
While much of the Buddha's teaching transcends specific cultures, there is a lot to be gained by the serious student through understanding the cultural context that nurtured the teachings we have received. It takes nothing away from the value of these teachings to know that complex cultural and philosophical currents have shaped the texts that have come down to us. In seeking the gnosis, or wordless knowing, that lies at the heart of these texts, understanding the philosophical history of India is crucial. Bronkhorst's book provides an excellent and reasonably concise primer on these subjects.
Defolosk
Perhaps the best introduction to Buddhist teachings. Bronkhorst is a great scholar and writes with great clarity. He really has a knack for presenting the most important parts of the teachings in a very insightful way. In only 60 pages he presents the Buddha’s original teachings with many excerpts from the suttas that makes the text really come alive. He is clear that the central teachings of the Buddha are the four noble truths (though this ‘title’ may be late) and the practices culminating in the four Jhanas. (Though sometimes he seems to forget this and states that the Buddha searched for liberation from rebirth, instead of from suffering.) He is also clear that the 12-link chain of Dependent Origination was not a part of the Buddha’s teaching, but is a later effort to unite the belief in some kind of liberating insight with the original teaching. The next part is a good overview of how the Abhidhamma came to be and how influential it became, especially the Sarvastavadins so-called ‘dharma theory’. The last chapter is a short overview of the ideas of early Mahayana.