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eBook Hiroshima’s Shadow download
History
Author: Lawrence Lifschultz,Kai Bird
ISBN: 0963058746
Subcategory: Military
Pages 584 pages
Publisher Pamphleteer's Press (January 1, 1998)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 552
ePUB size: 1333 kb
FB2 size: 1384 kb
DJVU size: 1754 kb
Other formats: docx mbr lit azw

eBook Hiroshima’s Shadow download

by Lawrence Lifschultz,Kai Bird


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Hiroshima's Shadow book.

Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsonian Controversy. An exhaustive, controversial, and moving volume that has its origins in the Smithsonian Institution’s cancellation of a planned exhibition in 1994-95 of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. To be included in the exhibition’s script were several scholarly studies and a number of historical documents that questioned the military necessity and moral legitimacy of that act.

To the contrary, it is a book of of essays written by a dozen different authors representing in equal number both sides of the controversy. The essays contained therein are equally divided between supporters and critics of the bombing of Hiroshima.

by. Bird, Kai; Lifschultz, Lawrence. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Lawrence Lifschultz, Kai Bird. Essays and memoirs discuss the decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan in 1945 show more.

Kai Bird, Book Author, American Author, Columnist, Pulitzer prize winner, biographies of political figures, Crossing . Kai Bird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist. In January 2017 he was appointed Executive Director and Distinguished Lecturer of CUNY Graduate Center's Leon Levy Center for Biography. He is currently writing a biography of President Jimmy Carter's White House years, under contract to Crown books (Random House). His most recent book, The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames, was a New York Times best-seller.

oceedings{, title {Hiroshima's shadow}, author {Michael J. Hogan and Kai Bird and Lawrence Lifschultz}, year {1998} }. Michael J. Hogan, Kai Bird, Lawrence Lifschultz.

Kai Bird (born September 2, 1951) is an American author and columnist, best known for his biographies of political figures. He won a Pulitzer Prize for American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer

Kai Bird (born September 2, 1951) is an American author and columnist, best known for his biographies of political figures. Robert Oppenheimer. Bird was born in 1951 in Eugene, Oregon. Foreign Service officer, and Bird spent his childhood in Jerusalem, Beirut, Dhahran, Cairo, and Mumbai. His father named him after Kai-Yu Hsu, a refugee from Communist China he met at the University of Oregon.

Kai Bird is the co-author with Martin J. Sherwin of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, American Prometheus: The . Sherwin of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (2005), which also won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography and the Duff Cooper Prize for History in London. He wrote The Chairman: John J. McCloy, the Making of the American Establishment (1992) and The Color of Truth: McGeorge Bundy & William Bundy, Brothers in Arms (1998)

Essays and memoirs discuss the decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan in 1945
Defolosk
Excellently written and obviously researched... Extremely revealing and informative...
HeonIc
Slanted against dropping the bomb. End formerly secret US documents highly informative about the decision to drop the bomb...
Quellik
Hiroshima's Shadow is a great book which contrary to what one reviewer claims, is not "revisionist history". To the contrary, it is a book of of essays written by a dozen different authors representing in equal number both sides of the controversy.

The essays contained therein are equally divided between supporters and critics of the bombing of Hiroshima. How is including in equal number, the viewpoints of both sides of a controversy, "revisionist" History-except in the eyes of zealous and possibly slightly insecure jingoists?

After reading all the pro-Truman, and pro-bombing advocates, the most persuasive to me, was the essay by journalist, and Wall Street Journal writer, Al Hunt, whose father served in WW-2 in the Pacific. Hunt spoke far more persuasively to me personally than any of the excellent essays of the various distinguished historians whose essays are also included in this book.

Hiroshima's Shadow is must reading for all who would like to read the best arguments from both sides of this controversial episode of American history. The book is well worth the money regardless of where you come down on this issue.
Grotilar
Here is an extract from my review of 'Hiroshima's Shadows', that appeared in 'New Politics', no. 25 (Summer 1998):
'Hiroshima's Shadow: Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsonian Controversy' is an enormous, and aesthetically handsome work, bringing together nearly 50 essays between between 1945 and 1997 by scholars, military, political and religious leaders, independent intellectuals, and survivors of the atomic bombings. The book is unusual in that, though it has a strong editorial point of view, the editors unflinchingly present voices from all sides of the argument.
The contribors include Albert Camus, Dwight Macdonald, Lewis Mumford, Mary McCarthy, A.J. Muste, among others. Defenders of the bomb include Charles Krauthammer who says that we should "let the Japanese commemorate the catastrophe they brought on themselves" (rather than mourn the use of the bomb), and Paul Fussel, an English professor and ex-front line combatant, who raises the slogan, "thank god for the atomic bomb." An even wider range of ideological positions is represented on the side of the critics: Lifschultz and Bird have recovered an anti-bomb editorial from the paleo-right-wing 'Human Events' and placed it alongside the observations of Mahatma Gandhi and Norman Thomas. As the editors put it, "the usual distinctions of left and right on economic and social issues were not reliable guides which could accurately predt what people thought about Hiroshima."
A substantial section of the book contains memoirs of a few survivors. These memoirs underscore the enduring reality that it was civilians, not military objectives, who were then, and remain, the prime target of nuclear weapons.
Thomand
Here is an extract from my review of 'Hiroshima's Shadows', that appeared in 'New Politics', no. 25 (Summer 1998):
'Hiroshima's Shadow: Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsonian Controversy' is an enormous, and aesthetically handsome work, bringing together nearly 50 essays between between 1945 and 1997 by scholars, military, political and religious leaders, independent intellectuals, and survivors of the atomic bombings. The book is unusual in that, though it has a strong editorial point of view, the editors unflinchingly present voices from all sides of the argument.
The contribors include Albert Camus, Dwight Macdonald, Lewis Mumford, Mary McCarthy, A.J. Muste, among others. Defenders of the bomb include Charles Krauthammer who says that we should "let the Japanese commemorate the catastrophe they brought on themselves" (rather than mourn the use of the bomb), and Paul Fussel, an English professor and ex-front line combatant, who raises the slogan, "thank god for the atomic bomb." An even wider range of ideological positions is represented on the side of the critics: Lifschultz and Bird have recovered an anti-bomb editorial from the paleo-right-wing 'Human Events' and placed it alongside the observations of Mahatma Gandhi and Norman Thomas. As the editors put it, "the usual distinctions of left and right on economic and social issues were not reliable guides which could accurately predict what people thought about Hiroshima."
A substantial section of the book contains memoirs of a few survivors. These memoirs underscore the enduring reality that it was civilians, not military objectives, who were then, and remain, the prime target of nuclear weapons.