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History
Author: Jeremy Paxman
ISBN: 0141012226
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 384 pages
Publisher Penguin UK; UK ed. edition (October 30, 2007)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 999
ePUB size: 1216 kb
FB2 size: 1981 kb
DJVU size: 1419 kb
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eBook On Royalty download

by Jeremy Paxman


In On Royalty Jeremy Paxman delves deep into Britain's royal past. Jeremy Paxman is used to making politicians explain themselves - but royalty has always been off limits.

In On Royalty Jeremy Paxman delves deep into Britain's royal past. What is the point of Kings and Queens? What do they do all day? And what does it mean to be one of them? Jeremy Paxman is used to making politicians explain themselves - but royalty has always been off limits. Until now. He takes a long hard look at our present incumbents to find out just what makes them tick.

BBC journalist Jeremy Paxman takes a very interesting look at European royalty and the interesting question .

BBC journalist Jeremy Paxman takes a very interesting look at European royalty and the interesting question of why do some fail, and others have managed to endure for centuries? Most of his story is, naturally, centered around the British monarchy, which has, more or less, survived for nearly a thousand years, except for one very brief break during the seventeenth century. But for a balanced look, this book isn't too bad at all. Paxman manages to keep a sense of humour about the topic, slides in a few great jokes, and comes up with some truly remarkable stories - both good and bad - about our continued fascination and questions about the monarchs among us.

On Royalty – Ebook written by Jeremy Paxman. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read On Royalty. What do they do all day? And what does it mean to be one of them? Jeremy Paxman is used to making politicians explain themselves – but royalty has always been off limits. In On Royalty he delves deep into the past and takes a long hard look at our present incumbents to find out just what makes them tick. Along the way he discovers some fascinating and little-known details. He takes a long hard look at our present incumbents to find out just what makes them In On Royalty Jeremy Paxman delves deep into Britain's royal past

Jeremy Paxman thinks we're neglecting the history of the British empire That will come as a surprise to the authors of the dozen fat books about it that have appeared over the last few years.

Jeremy Paxman thinks we're neglecting the history of the British empire. But, by and large, no one has much to say about empire. That will come as a surprise to the authors of the dozen fat books about it that have appeared over the last few years. If Paxman thinks his Empire is filling a gap, he's mistaken. British imperial history is highly contested territory

Jeremy Paxman’s affable book looks at monarchies, in Britain and elsewhere.

Jeremy Paxman’s affable book looks at monarchies, in Britain and elsewhere. He became the prime minister of Bulgaria, not its president. His most recent book is God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything. Continue reading the main story. We’re interested in your feedback on this page. Tell us what you think.

Jeremy Paxman is used to making politicians explain themselves – but royalty has always been off limits. Such as:, how Albania came to advertise in England for a king, which English queen gave birth in front of 67 people, how easy it is to beat up future kings of England, and how meeting the Queen is a bit scary – whoever you are. What is the point of Kings and Queens? What do they do all day? And what does it mean to be one of them?

In On Royalty Jeremy Paxman delves deep into Britain's royal past. Such as: How Albania came to advertise in England for a king. Which English queen gave birth in front of 67 people

Jeremy Dickson Paxman (born 11 May 1950) is a British broadcaster, journalist, author, and television presenter.

Jeremy Dickson Paxman (born 11 May 1950) is a British broadcaster, journalist, author, and television presenter. At Cambridge, he was a member of a Labour Party club and described himself as a socialist, although in later life described himself as a one-nation conservative

In On Royalty Jeremy Paxman delves deep into Britain's royal past. What is the point of Kings and Queens? What do they do all day? And what does it mean to be one of them? Jeremy Paxman is used to making politicians explain themselves - but royalty has always been off limits. Until now. He takes a long hard look at our present incumbents to find out just what makes them tick. Along the way he discovers some fascinating and little-known details. Such as: how Albania came to advertise in England for a king which English queen gave birth in front of 67 people how easy it is to beat up future kings of England and how meeting the Queen is a bit scary - whoever you are ... No other book will tell you quite as much about our kings, queens, princes and princesses: who they are and what they're for. 'Paxman's book is everyhing that royalty is not allowed to be - witty, stylish, intelligent, pugnacious and political. The Times 'On Royalty is an absorbing, well-researched book, part serious enquiry, part rollicking anecdote' Evening Standard 'Action-packed and entertaining' Sunday Telegraph Jeremy Paxman is a journalist, best known for his work presenting Newsnight and University Challenge. His books include Empire, On Royalty, The English and The Political Animal. He lives in Oxfordshire.
Grarana
I read books for one of two reasons -- to educate myself and for entertainment. Every now and then I get lucky, and a book will provide both of my needs at the same time. And I confess to a certain liking for reading about royalty, usually because if the book is set in the past, the life of a royal person is usually going to be the most informative -- and have the most documentation -- of the period that I'm reading about.

BBC journalist Jeremy Paxman takes a very interesting look at European royalty and the interesting question of why do some fail, and others have managed to endure for centuries? Most of his story is, naturally, centered around the British monarchy, which has, more or less, survived for nearly a thousand years, except for one very brief break during the seventeenth century. I figured I was going to get not much more than a scandal sheet along with a few historical bits and pieces in On Royalty: A Polite Inquiry into Some Strangely Related Families. Was I in for a surprise!

Paxman dishes up plenty of salacious little tales, but most of all he explores just what monarchs do -- and what they don't. Or rather, shouldn't be doing if they want to continue to occupy a throne.

After a brief preface and introduction, Paxman takes a very logical and orderly fashion to his study of that rare species of human, that known as royalty. He starts with the most obvious of tasks, that of finding a throne to occupy, and establishing an heir or two to help secure things. And after all, there is an art to being and acting royal without looking like a fool -- or worse, an imposter. If you don't already have a heir, the best way to get one is to marry someone suitable, preferably just as royal as yourself, and produce an heir and with luck, a spare.

After these basics, the more subtle aspects of royalty are examined. One of the most interesting chapters went into the idea that a monarch is indeed God's annointed, able to cure the sick, despense justice to those who can't get it, and overseeing charity. And often these abilities were recognized by the panoply of a coronation -- out of all of the western monarchies, the only one that seems to have hung onto this practice is the British one. But divine favour it seems, can vanish just as quickly, and Paxman uses the story of England's Charles I, whose death shocked Europe at the time, and produced England's only time without a king -- which only lasted for about twelve years, and when Charles I's son, another Charles, came to the throne, there was a great deal of rejoicing for everyone concerned.

But as time passed, the powers of monarchs were steadily trimmed -- the last of the autocratic rulers were swept away in the revolutions after World War I, and most monarchies these days are constitutional ones, where the ruler, whether King or Queen, is a figurehead. It's here, in the final section of the book, that Paxman shows why certain monarchs have survived, and others haven't. Most of his concentration is on Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and her family, showing how they've provided stability in a world that has ever changing politicians -- there may be a change in prime ministers, but the Queen remains, and has remained so for more than fifty years now. There's also some talk about how her parents, George VI and the late Queen Mother, gave Britain the emotional and symbolic support that was needed in the face of the Blitz and World War II, the turmoil of Edward VIII's very brief reign and that Simpson woman, and finally the modern crises that her family has weathered.

Not everyone will be pleased at the way that Paxman shows the late Princess Diana, and the Duchess of York, two upper-class commoners that married the Queen's elder sons. Diana, especially, is shown in her far from regal moments, including a vicious verbal swipe at her husband that was the closest that I've seen to public castration, and the infamous 'toe-sucking' incident that heralded Fergie's fall from royal favour. And there is a bit of a replay of the mass hysteria that followed Diana's sudden death as well.

The author does raise some interesting questions as to whether or not there is a future for royalty in the new century. But he's also wise enough to let the reader answer that question for themselves as well.

And it's pretty certain to be the summer of royalty both on television and in the bookstores -- after all, 2007 marks ten years since Princess Diana was killed in a Paris car crash. There's certain to be plenty of memorials about her, and yet another rehash of the conspiracy theories.

But for a balanced look, this book isn't too bad at all. Paxman manages to keep a sense of humour about the topic, slides in a few great jokes, and comes up with some truly remarkable stories -- both good and bad -- about our continued fascination and questions about the monarchs among us.

Recommended.
santa
Jeremy Paxman excels in turning out books which, while they might challenge and annoy you, always entertain. Here he turns his spotlight on Royalty, primarily on the House of Windsor with a few excursions to Denmark, Albania, and some other monarchical or formerly monarchical areas. Paxman is absolutely not a royalist. He finds the Windsors fusty, dull, uncouth, and implausible. He cannot see a reason why a modern government or society should have room for inherited power or position. Yet he acknowledges that, at least under Queen Elizabeth II, the system works fairly well most of the time for Britain.

I am an American of primarily British ancestry, and even though many of my forebears came to the New World to get away from the Windsors' forebears, I nevertheless feel a strong sympathy for and admiration for the British Royal Family. Paxman sometimes sets my teeth on edge when he's being particularly condescending to them, but nevertheless I chuckled and snickered much of my way through it. Occasionally he makes an error, particularly in his rush to condemn King George V for being afraid to allow his cousin Tsar Nicholas II into England after the 1917 Revolution. Others have also found fault with the King for this, which did eventually lead to the Tsar and his family's murder, but they forget or choose not to remember that when the King said no he was leaving his cousin in the hands of a democratic Russian government, not the Bolsheviks who didn't take power until months later, when it was too late to help the Tsar. There was no way George V could have known what was coming.

Despite errors like this I really enjoyed On Royalty. Paxman has a flair for fine writing, and he can turn a phrase with the best of them. By the end he admits that despite the illogic of monarchy, the system works and continues to hold great appeal. I suppose my favorite section dealt with the Stauntons, a family of gentry who have held the same land for centuries and who have always been firm monarchists. Like them, even though the Royal Family disappoints me from time to time, I stand ready to "defend the castle" if the call ever comes.