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eBook THE Eighth Battalion the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment 1914-1919 download
History
Author: H. J. Wenyon
ISBN: 1843426714
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 358 pages
Publisher Naval & Military Press (October 15, 2015)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 461
ePUB size: 1340 kb
FB2 size: 1963 kb
DJVU size: 1777 kb
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eBook THE Eighth Battalion the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment 1914-1919 download

by H. J. Wenyon


The Battalion was formed on 12th September 1914 at Maidstone and allocated to 72nd Brigade, 24th . Both authors served in the battalion, Wenyon commanded it from December 1917 and was awarded the DSO and Bar, Brown became 2IC in April 1918 and was awarded an MC.

The Battalion was formed on 12th September 1914 at Maidstone and allocated to 72nd Brigade, 24th Division, one of Kitchener's Third New Army divisions, with which it served throughout the war on the Western Front, having landed in France on 30th August 1915. One officer, Lieut . Dean, was awarded the VC in September 1918 for gallantry near Lens.

The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment was a line infantry regiment of the British Army based in the county of Kent in existence from 1881 to 1961. The regiment was created on 1 July 1881 as part of the Childers Reforms, originally as the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment), by the amalgamation of the 50th (Queen's Own) Regiment of Foot and the 97th (The Earl of Ulster's) Regiment of Foot

Between 1914 and 1919 the Regiment gained 70 Battle Honours, including Afghanistan 1919, and 5 Victoria Crosses .

Between 1914 and 1919 the Regiment gained 70 Battle Honours, including Afghanistan 1919, and 5 Victoria Crosses – 3 to serving members and 2 to ex-members. At least 1 Officer and 3 ORs are also known to have been recommended, but do not receive the award. History History of the 8th Bn The Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment, 1914-19, Lt Col Wenyon, DSO & Maj HS Brown, MC, Hazell, Watson & Viney, 1921 9th (Reserve) Bn. Summary 24 Oct 1914 - Formed at Chatham on as a Service battalion for K4; 93rd Brigade, 31st Division.

British Army, Royal West Kent Regiment, 8th Battalion. armies, infantry regiments. The history of the Eighth Battalion The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment 1914-1919. UK. Associated subjects. british army, infantry regiments, regiments of the line. royal west kent regiment. The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment, 1914-1919.

By H. J. Wenyon H. Wenyon  .

Specialised books for the serious student of conflict Both authors served in the battalion, Wenyon commanded it from December 1917 an. .

Specialised books for the serious student of conflict. No products in the basket. The Battalion was formed on 12th September 1914 at Maidstone and allocated to 72nd Brigade, 24th Division, one of Kitchener’s Third New Army divisions, with which it served throughout the war on the Western Front, having landed in France on 30th August 1915.

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Between 1919 and 1921, 2nd Battalion was stationed in Germany and Ireland, before settling . Explore the history and collections of The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment by visiting the regimental museum in Maidstone.

Between 1919 and 1921, 2nd Battalion was stationed in Germany and Ireland, before settling down to British garrison duty. In 1937, it moved on to Palestine. Aside from three years in Britain from 1937, 1st Battalion spent the inter-war years on the Indian sub-continent, including service in the Third Afghan War (1919). The 2nd Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) on manoeuvres, India, 1912.

Rothstein A. (1980) From War to Peace. In: The Soldiers’ Strikes of 1919. Palgrave Macmillan, London.

S. W. Wenyon, History of the 8th Battalion, Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment, 1914–1919 ( London and Aylesbury: 1921 ) p. 25. oogle Scholar. 4. E. Wyrall, The Somerset Light Infantry, 1914–1919 ( London: 1927 ) p. 34. 5. Seymour, History of the Rifle Brigade in the War of 1914–1918, II ( London: 1936 ) P. 35. Rothstein A.

1922 - Name change - Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment . to form the Queen's Regiment which was also amalgamated with the Royal Hampshire Regiment, on 9 September 1992, to form the Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment (Queen's and Royal Hampshires), see Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment was popularly and operationally known as the Royal West Kents. Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment. Egypt 1882, Nile 1884-85, South Africa 1900-02.

The Battalion was formed on 12th September 1914 at Maidstone and allocated to 72nd Brigade, 24th Division, one of Kitchener’s Third New Army divisions, with which it served throughout the war on the Western Front, having landed in France on 30th August 1915. Both authors served in the battalion, Wenyon commanded it from December 1917 and was awarded the DSO and Bar, Brown became 2IC in April 1918 and was awarded an MC. One officer, Lieut D.J Dean, was awarded the VC in September 1918 for gallantry near Lens. There is no overall casualty figure though in many cases figures are given for definite actions or over certain periods; Soldiers Died shows total dead close to 800.'The book is divided into ten phases, arranged chronologically, each phase covering a specific period described in the list of contents, though for some reason the dates for Phase IV are omitted in the contents list but given in the text - September 1916 to April 1917. So this is a continuous narrative, based on the War Diary supplemented by written and spoken contributions of particiants. It begins with the formation of the battalion, training, the move to France and the Battle of Loos (September 1914-September 1915), which was the battalion’s first major action in which the casualties were appalling. Of the twenty-five officers who went over the top twenty-four were hit (thirteen killed) and of other ranks over 550 out of some 900 became casualties. The maps are good and include copies of two trench maps, the Ypres Salient and Lens. The account ends with the list of Honours and Awards