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eBook Ask the Fellows Who Cut the Hay download
History
Author: George Ewart Evans
ISBN: 0571086489
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 262 pages
Publisher Faber and Faber; New Impression edition (July 3, 1972)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 804
ePUB size: 1400 kb
FB2 size: 1317 kb
DJVU size: 1904 kb
Other formats: rtf lrf lit mobi

eBook Ask the Fellows Who Cut the Hay download

by George Ewart Evans


Born in the mining town of Abercynon, South Wales, George Ewart Evans (1909-88) was a pioneering oral historian

Ships from and sold by RAREWAVES-IMPORTS. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Born in the mining town of Abercynon, South Wales, George Ewart Evans (1909-88) was a pioneering oral historian. In 1948 he settled with his family in Blaxhall, Suffolk, and through conversing with his neighbours he developed an interest in their dialect and the aspects of rural life which they described. Many were agricultural labourers, born before the turn of the century, who had worked on farms before the arrival of mechanisation.

A classic picture of the rural past in a remote Suffolk village, revealed in the conversations of old people who recall harvest customs, home crafts, poetic usages in dialect, old farm tools, smugglers' tales, and rural customs and beliefs going back to the time of Chaucer.

Faber & Faber, 1965 - History - 262 pages. A classic picture of the rural past in a remote Suffolk village, revealed in the conversations of old people who recall harvest customs, home crafts, poetic usages in dialect, old farm tools, smugglers' tales, and rural customs and beliefs going back to the time of Chaucer.

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BBC blurb - In this week's Archive On Four, historian Alan Dein celebrates the centenary of his mentor George Ewart Evans, collector of Suffolk farming tales

Best Books About Nineteenth Century History. BBC blurb - In this week's Archive On Four, historian Alan Dein celebrates the centenary of his mentor George Ewart Evans, collector of Suffolk farming tales. Evans began by chatting to his neighbours over the fireside in the 1950's and transcribing stories about poaching shepherding, smuggling and ditching.

George Ewart Evans (1 April 1909 – 11 January 1988) was a Welsh-born schoolteacher, writer and folklorist who .

George Ewart Evans (1 April 1909 – 11 January 1988) was a Welsh-born schoolteacher, writer and folklorist who became a dedicated collector of oral history and oral tradition in the East Anglian countryside from the 1940s to 1970s, and produced eleven books of collections of these materials. This work (Ask The Fellows Who Cut The Hay) was, after many rejections, published by Faber and Faber in 1956, and the same house published the ten further books of similar character which Evans wrote over the next three decades.

Many were agricultural labourers, born before the turn of the century, who had worked on farms before the arrival of mechanisation.

A few pictures from Saturday's official launch of the book 'Ask the fellows who cut the coal' George Ewart Evans of Abercynon and the commemorative street plaque for him in Abercynon unveiled by the Mayor of RCT. Event and presentation held at Llancaich Fawr with Abercynon Male. Event and presentation held at Llancaich Fawr with Abercynon Male Voice Choir. Author - Gareth Williams Produced by David Maddox Published by Keelin Publications Designed by Seer Design Illustrated by David Gentleman.

George Ewart Evans (author), David Gentleman (illustrator). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

George Ewart Evans was in many ways one of the pioneers of oral history. These people had memories which went back well into the 19th century. Our most recommended books. Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell.

Ndlaitha
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A farm worker in the featured village of Blaxhall on the Suffolk Coast of England sums up the theme of this book nicely: "The trouble with farming today is, it's such a lonely job. When I started as a back'us boy about thirty years ago at least you had plenty of company."

I love this book about the old hand-tool, hands-on, methods of farming and its author's focus on the importance of oral history in understanding the past.

Many years it when I was a student at Cooperstown, this book was required reading. I have recommended it to many in the intervening years and its title has almost become my mantra.

I am delighted to have this reprint!

Kim Burdick
Stanton, Delaware
MrRipper
my mother was born in Blaxhall, and I spent a lot of time there as a child. I knew some of the people in the book and things were still done in the old ways. Some today still are ! What a wonderful history of a time gone by !!