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History
Author: Anthony Goodman,James Gillespie
ISBN: 0198201893
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 312 pages
Publisher Clarendon Press; 1 edition (May 20, 1999)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 642
ePUB size: 1732 kb
FB2 size: 1646 kb
DJVU size: 1728 kb
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eBook Richard II: The Art of Kingship download

by Anthony Goodman,James Gillespie


ISBN-13: 978-0199262205. Why is ISBN important? ISBN. Richard II gives scholars and advanced students a good overview of the current state of debate, and our long wait has proved worthwhile. mportant and worthwhile.

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Anthony Goodman (1936-2016) was an English professor emeritus of medieval and renaissance history at the University of Edinburgh. His main field of interest was late medieval England, and he published books on subjects such as John of Gaunt and the Wars of the Roses.

Anthony Goodman, James L. Gillespie. Richard II (1377-1399) was deposed and probably murdered at the end of a dramatic kingship characterized by the struggle between royal authority and the power of the great magnates of the land

Anthony Goodman, James L. Oxford University Press, 2003 - History - 312 pages. Richard II (1377-1399) was deposed and probably murdered at the end of a dramatic kingship characterized by the struggle between royal authority and the power of the great magnates of the land. Richard faced down the leaders of the Peasant Revolt of 1381 when aged only 14 but found the magnates much harder to vanquish. 1399 saw the nadir of his royal power in the Merciless Parliament.

The re-assessment of the character and practice of medieval kingship is a lively academic subject. 1. Introduction 2. Richard II in the Chronicles 3. The Kingship of Richard II 4. Richard II's Councils 5. Richard II and the Church 6. Richard II and the Higher Nobility 7. Richard II and London 8. Finance and Trade under Richard II 9. Richard II and the Wider Realm 10. Richard II and the House of Luxembourg 11. Richard II and the Literary Arts 12. Richard II and the Visual Arts Bibliography Contributors. Richard II: The Art of Kingship.

Doing Things beside Domesday Book. The Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction.

Anthony Goodman and James L. Gillespie, eds. New York: Oxford University Press. Recommend this journal. Journal of British Studies.

George B. Stow, James L. Gillespie, Anthony Goodman. Published: 1 January 2000. Albion, Volume 32; doi:10.

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Similar books and articles. Eric Fernie, An Architectural History of Norwich Cathedral. Clarendon Studies in the History of Ar. New York and Oxford: Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1993.

Richard II (1377-1399) was deposed and probably murdered at the end of a dramatic kingship characterized by the struggle between royal authority and the power of the great magnates of the land. Richard faced down the leaders of the Peasant Revolt of 1381 when aged only 14 but found the magnates much harder to vanquish. 1399 saw the nadir of his royal power in the Merciless Parliament. This attempt to oust power from the king seems to have spurred Richard into recovering the royal prerogative but the king went so far beyond 'good governance' that his final two years in power became known as the 'tyranny'.The record of his reign was muddied by hostile chroniclers such as Walsingham and the anonymous monk of Evesham, and these distortions went on to be propagated by Shakespeare, leading Henry Hallam to write, in 1818, that 'the reign of Richard II is, in a constitutional light, the most interesting part of our earlier history; and it has been the most imperfectly written.' This collection of essays by leading historians aims to redress this balance and present a more accurate version of the king's 'governance'.Drawing on scholarship from both sides of the Atlantic, the re-evaluation of Richard's reign begins by deconstructing the distortions of chroniclers and the myth of the king's insanity. It goes on to examine the personal rule of the king, the role of his council and the court, and his relations with Londoners and the provinces, with the Church and the higher nobility. Other essays go beyond England's borders to look at the European perspective on trade and warfare, and on the marriage alliance between Richard and the house of Luxembourg. Finally, scholars of literature and the fine arts examine Richard's role as the chivalrous royal patron of culture. The combined result gives a rounded portrait of this fascinating and much maligned king.
FLIDER
This is an excellent book that gives a very different view to the common perspection of Richard II. It is a bit advanced and is intended for people with a good background knowledge of the subject. The icing on the cake was the article by Caroline Barron. Highly recommended.
Fesho
This book is a collection of academic articles, so it is not for the general reader. The Amazon “look inside” feature gives the table of contents, so I don’t have to recreate it here. The contributors are established historians, so you know you are getting well-researched material. I would say the general history is pre-supposed, so here we are getting down to the nitty-gritty. For instance, I learned a lot of useful tidbits in the “Richard II and London” chapter which is generally glossed over elsewhere. As one would expect, some of the articles are more interesting than others, depending on the reader’s level of interest. I made a lot of bookmarks, so I did find this volume useful but I didn’t particularly enjoy reading it.