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History
Author: Oliver Lubrich,Kenneth J. Northcott,Sonia Wichmann,Krouk Dean
ISBN: 022600645X
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 336 pages
Publisher University of Chicago Press; Reprint edition (September 27, 2012)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 956
ePUB size: 1480 kb
FB2 size: 1436 kb
DJVU size: 1508 kb
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eBook Travels in the Reich, 1933-1945: Foreign Authors Report from Germany download

by Oliver Lubrich,Kenneth J. Northcott,Sonia Wichmann,Krouk Dean


Oliver Lubrich is professor of German and comparative literature at the University of Berne in Switzerland. This volume performs the feat of looking at Nazi Germany in a new way. TRAVELS IN THE THE REICH, 1933-1945: FOREIGN AUTHORS REPORT FROM GERMANY is an anthology of the letters, diaries, personal reflections and excerpts from published works by authors such as Virginia Woolf, Thomas Wolfe, William Shirer, Samuel Beckett and others, who visited or lived in Germany between the years 1933 and 1945. Some of these entries will make you cringe, some are just first-rate writing.

Translated by Kenneth J. Northcott, Sonia Wichmann, and Dean Krouk. Even now, wrote Christopher Isherwood in his Berlin Diary of 1933, I can’t altogether believe that any of this has really happened. Three years later, W. E. B. DuBois described Germany as silent, nervous, suppressed; it speaks in whispers.

Sonia Wichmann (Translator). Krouk Dean (Translator).

Bibliographic information. Kenneth J. Northcott, Sonia Wichmann, Krouk Dean.

Written in the moment by writers such as Virginia Woolf, Isak Dinesen, Samuel Beckett, Jean-Paul Sartre, William Shirer, Georges Simenon, and Albert Camus, the essays, letters, and articles gathered here offer fascinating insight into the range of responses to Nazi Germany. Bibliographic information. Travels in the Reich, 1933-1945: Foreign Authors Report from Germany. Translated by.

From the publisher: ‘Even now’, wrote Christopher Isherwood in his Berlin Diary of 1933, ‘I can’t altogether believe that any of this has really happened’. DuBois described Germany as ‘silent, nervous, suppressed; it speaks in whispers’. In contrast, a young John F. Kennedy, in the journal he kept on a German tour in 1937, wrote, ‘The Germans really are too good-it makes people gang against them for protection’.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2010, Oliver Lubrich and others published Travels in the Reich, 1933–45. Book · January 2010 with 2 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Publisher: University of Chicago Press. Cite this publication.

Northcott, Kenneth . Lubrich, Oliver, Wichmann, Sonia.

University of Chicago Press. Northcott, Kenneth .

Written in the moment by writers such as Virginia Woolf, Isak Dinesen, Samuel Beckett, Jean-Paul Sartre, William Shirer, Georges Simenon, and Albert Camus, the essays, letters, and articles gathered here offer fascinating insight into the range of responses to Nazi Germany

Given the glut of books about Nazism that rehash familiar ground, Oliver Lubrich's Travels in the Reich achieves .

There is undoubtedly much that we can learn from these essays, letters and articles.

An anthology of travel writing about Nazi Germany doesn't sound very promising, but the well-chosen extracts in this .

An anthology of travel writing about Nazi Germany doesn't sound very promising, but the well-chosen extracts in this collection are both powerful and poignant. The 24-year-old Martha Dodd, daughter of the American ambassador, met Hitler in 1933.

“Even now,” wrote Christopher Isherwood in his Berlin Diary of 1933, “I can’t altogether believe that any of this has really happened.” Three years later, W. E. B. DuBois described Germany as “silent, nervous, suppressed; it speaks in whispers.” In contrast, a young John F. Kennedy, in the journal he kept on a German tour in 1937, wrote, “The Germans really are too good—it makes people gang against them for protection.”Drawing on such published and unpublished accounts from writers and public figures visiting Germany, Travels in the Reich creates a chilling composite portrait of the reality of life under Hitler. Written in the moment by writers such as Virginia Woolf, Isak Dinesen, Samuel Beckett, Jean-Paul Sartre, William Shirer, Georges Simenon, and Albert Camus, the essays, letters, and articles gathered here offer fascinating insight into the range of responses to Nazi Germany. While some accounts betray a distressing naivete, overall what is striking is just how clearly many of the travelers understood the true situation—and the terrors to come.Through the eyes of these visitors, Travels in the Reich offers a new perspective on the quotidian—yet so often horrifying—details of German life under Nazism, in accounts as gripping and well-written as a novel, but bearing all the weight of historical witness.

Kagaramar
This is quite a distinctive and interesting view of life in the Third Reich. The editor has combined a number of contemporary accounts, several by familiar names one does not usually associate with Nazi Germany, which offer some fascinating perspectives on what was occurring during this period. The editor puts the material into helpful perspective with some introductory discussion of the sources of the accounts, identifies some of the more perceptive pieces, discourses upon the reactions of some of the contributors to what they saw, and offers previews of nearly every excerpt in the collection. One of the most interesting aspects of the collection is how some of the most insightful pieces are writen by some surprising authors. For example, W.E.B. Dubois offers one of the most cogent explanations for why the German people embraced Hitlerism; Thomas Wolfe, who spent a good deal of time in Germany, uses a railway journey to explore various themes; and Karen Blixen (Isak Dinesen) recounts her impressions during a wartime visit. There are also some more familiar contributors as well: Christopher Isherwood; Howard K. Smith; Sartre; William Shirer, and a very youthful JFK.

Each piece has a very brief introduction to establish its context, with a bit about the often unfamiliar authors (e.g., there are several Scandinavian journalists represented). Some pieces run a page or so; others, such as those of Dubois and Wolfe, are somewhat longer. The translations are uniformly effective. The collection is organized chronologically, so I found the most poignant selections appeared at the end of the book. These pieces deal with living in (principally) Berlin during the allied bombing that was so destructive. One can only wonder why the Nazis did not sue for peace as early as 1943. One contributor suggests, and I think this is the core of the matter, that the leadership feared what would happen to them because of their record of atrocities both before and during the war, especially in connection with the horrors inflicted on the Jews.

The editor has included some additional material at the end of the book which is quite helpful: a chronology; an author-by-author listing of where each selection was drawn from; and a 16-page bibliography of some published material about each contributor. It is often said that there is no substitute for personal on-site observation of historical events. This book certainly validates that statement, but also demonstrates that personal observations of everyday life (railroad journeys; shopping for food; eating in a restaurant or going to a bar) also add a vital perpective on such events.
Galanjov
This volume performs the feat of looking at Nazi Germany in a new way. TRAVELS IN THE THE REICH, 1933-1945: FOREIGN AUTHORS REPORT FROM GERMANY is an anthology of the letters, diaries, personal reflections and excerpts from published works by authors such as Virginia Woolf, Thomas Wolfe, William Shirer, Samuel Beckett and others, who visited or lived in Germany between the years 1933 and 1945.

Some of these entries will make you cringe, some are just first-rate writing. But what is surprising is how much these foreigners were aware of the turn Germany had taken when Hitler came to power in 1933. As Christopher Isherwood put it: "I can't altogether believe that any of this has really happened."

Speaking for myself, I discovered two authors I had not known before. I loved getting to know Martha Dodd, the daughter of the U.S. Ambassador to Berlin from 1933-1937, as she described various incidents she witnessed, including the Night of Long Knives in June 1934, which occurred on a hot, beautiful day in Berlin. I was in awe of the power of the writing of Thomas Wolfe, whom I had never heard of before. Here he is describing a train journey that he took when he left Berlin for the last time. At the Belgian border, a fellow passenger runs into difficulties:

"They marched him right along the platform, white as a sheet, greasy looking, protesting volubly, in a voice that had a kind of anguished lilt. He came fight by us. I made a movement with my arms. The greasy money sweated in my hand and I did not know what to do. I started to speak to him. And at the same time I was praying that he would not speak. I tried to look away from him, but I could not look away. He came toward us, still protesting volubly that everything could be explained, that all of it was an absurd mistake. And just for a moment as he passed us, he stopped talking, glanced at us, white-faced, smiling pitiably, his eyes rested on us for a moment, and then, without a sign of further recognition, he went on by."

Five stars.
Hellstaff
An absolutely fascinating collation of impressions of contemporary vistors to the Germany of the Third Reich. In reading this book , I almost felt the fear and tension that Germans must have felt during this period of time, when opposition to the system was heavily punished and life was ruled by a heavy handed bureaucracy. The stark reality of everyday living comes through very clearly in some of the extracts of the commentators featured in this work. For those interested in the social history of life in the Third Reich , this book is a fascinating read.