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History
Author: David Remnick
ISBN: 0670852368
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 608 pages
Publisher Random House; 1st edition (1993)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 293
ePUB size: 1770 kb
FB2 size: 1458 kb
DJVU size: 1628 kb
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eBook Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire download

by David Remnick


Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire is a book by American author David Remnick. Often cited as an example of New Journalism, it won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1994.

Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire is a book by American author David Remnick.

David Remnick’s book Lenin’s Tomb. is a gem; thorough, informative and instructive

David Remnick’s book Lenin’s Tomb. is a gem; thorough, informative and instructive. He traveled the length and breadth of former Soviet Union countries, interviewed leaders of science, industry, trade workers, farmers, dissidents, and advocates who provided personal views of the Soviet political machine and its impact on their lives.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Электронная книга "Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire", David Remnick

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In 1997, Remnick published a follow-up work, Resurrection, dealing with the creation of a new Russian state.

David Remnick is a journalist and writer. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1994 for his book Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire. Before joining The New Yorker, Remnick was a reporter and the Moscow correspondent for The Washington Post. He also has served on the New York Public Library board of trustees. In 2010 he published his sixth book, The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama.

Remnick paints like Seurat. MORE BY Robert Legvold. September/October 1993. Rather than depict reality in straightforward analytical terms, he lets the shape of the Soviet Union's passing emerge from a mass of variously subtle and vivid dots of paint. The dots are the people he came to know during his assignment to Moscow as the Washington Post's correspondent from 1985 to 1991. Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire.

Acclaim for. David remnick’s. Remnick has written what may be the definitive narrative of the last days of the Soviet Union. This book, after all, chronicles the last days of one of the cruelest regimes in human history. Lenin’s tomb . An eloquent and riveting oral history of an epochal moment of change. is a history that combines old-fashioned narrative of great events with the more fashionable approach of describing common lives. And having lived through those final days, having lived in Moscow and traveled throughout the republics of the last empire, I am convinced that for all the difficulties ahead, there will be no return to the past.

A moving illumination. We have added thousands of books to our CLEARANCE SALE!

A moving illumination. Remnick is the witness for us all. ? Wall Street Journal. We have added thousands of books to our CLEARANCE SALE! Go check it out and see what great deals you can find! Russia.

His journalistic experience, from 1988 to the end of 1991 (with a trip back in mid-1992) formed the basis of his 1993 book, but he doesn’t skimp on historical scholarship, taking readers through the 75-year period of Communist rule.

In the tradition of John Reed's classic Ten Days That Shook the World, this bestselling account of the collapse of the Soviet Union combines the global vision of the best historical scholarship with the immediacy of eyewitness journalism. "A moving illumination . . . Remnick is the witness for us all."--Wall Street Journal.From the Trade Paperback edition.
Steep
This is an impressive narrative history covering a critical period in Russian history that haunts the world to this day.It provides context for Vladimir Putin's attempt to build a new (arguably evil) empire. The book has the content and context supported by the author's observations of living in Russia in those fateful years along with amazing first person interviews of key players from the decades the Soviet Union existed.

All of this is brought to life through Remnick's persuasive and entertaining writing style. Consider his indictment of the Soviet Union's leaders in the Communist Party, KBG, and military who were culpable in an ideological and decades long lie, "the truth challenged their existence, their comfort and privileges. Their right to a decent office, a cut of meat, the month vacation in the Crimea - it all depended on a colossal social deception, on the forced ignorance of 280 million people."

His overriding thesis is based on the deception the leaders perpetuated, "When history was no longer an instrument of the Party, the Party was doomed to failure. For history proved precisely that: the Party was rotten to the core." He compares it to Oz, "a colossal mistake, and the only way to endure it was the perfection of irony." Irony, black humour, resigned acceptance and dicey alcoholism. In proving the latter he draws on Yerofeyev's novel, Moscow Circles, which drew on real life, "His greatest relief is in the mastery of the binge. He is an artful mixologist." This mixologist is the everyman of the Soviet Union who would drink nail varnish and lavender water (or bathtub gin, hair tonic, bug spray) in a pinch just to survive the grey, monolith that was the empire.

In order to maintain the totalitarian system, its leaders used the regular and secret police along with judges to maintain control. If that was threatening enough, your neighbor or own child may inform on you. All the while you spent your day waiting in line for bread and meat and years for an apartment, a phone, and a burial plot. Meanwhile, the leaders and party functionaries are labeled by Remnick as the largest and most abusive Mafia the world has ever seen. Even in far flung outposts of the Empire like Azerbaijan, these shameless officials live on vast estates. One fake Communist mucky-muck built his castle with thousands of slave labourers. The grounds eventually filled with peacocks and thoroughbred horses while the bedrooms held concubines.

The Gorbachev and Yeltsin saga is well-laid out and sadly farcical. I remember watching the news of the 1991 coup attempt. It was a surreal as they come. Yet, the Soviet Union was surreal in that 280 million people lived for decades as peasant hostages. A surreal Oz run by a ruthless Mafia who had the benign approval of millions. Even the most talented dystopian novelist could not invent the Soviet Union.
invasion
This book tells the story of the struggle of Russia to reclaim it's history from the tissue of lies the Communist Party packaged and sold in place of the truth. Remnick, who was an American journalist in Moscow, brings a host of information together detailing how people, at great risk to themselves, investigated the bloody facts of the history of the USSR which the Communists wanted to paint over. The slow admissions to the Katyn Massacre, the Red Terror under Lenin and the truely brutal Purges of Stalin were forced into the open and helped to discredit the Soviet regime and hastened it's collapse. "Lenin's Tomb" is a book of many stories that are all well told. This book is sadly prophetic in it's warning of the danger of another dictator/oligarchy taking power before a democratic Russia could be established. Enter Vladimir Putin.
Kajishakar
David Remnick’s book “Lenin’s Tomb…” is a gem; thorough, informative and instructive. He traveled the length and breadth of former Soviet Union countries, interviewed leaders of science, industry, trade workers, farmers, dissidents, and advocates who provided personal views of the Soviet political machine and its impact on their lives. The interviews with key political figures, journalists and ordinary citizens also provided stories of neglect and physical abuse amid those who blatantly disregarded basic human needs and others who didn’t seem to care.

Remnick’s fascinating book contained detailed historical accounts from those who witnessed the chain-of-events of Stalinism.These person to person contacts were very moving. Stalin’s brutal regime was hard and ugly. It was difficult to understand and discouraging to read comments of admiration, living under this system, rather than scores of condemnation.

History enthusiasts should read this book for an in-depth knowledge of Stalinism and how it dramatized and excoriated the “soul” of its peoples and, what life was like under a despotic Communist ruler. I could not put this book down. It’s readable, interesting and tells a good story; chocked full of events from people who were “drivers” of the Communist world and of those who orchestrated its demise.

An extraordinary revelation of a perverted political system perpetrated upon the innocent. A very impressive book; should rank with the best. Strongly recommend.

Bruce E. McLeod, Jr.
Las Vegas, Nevada
11 April 2014
Raniconne
"Lenin's Tomb" is without a doubt the definitive account of the internal machinations of the Communist Party that led to the coup to end Gorbachev's reign as Soviet Premier, the ensuing chaos that followed and the collapse of the Soviet Union with the coup against Gorbachev and the conditions that led to the rise of Yeltsin. Remnick's role as the USSR correspondent for the Washington Post positioned him to be the perfect eyewitness to this history and his gifts as a writer makes the story eminently accessible, something that probably would be inaccessible in the hands of less gifted historians. Almost 25 years later, this is a masterpiece and provides keen insights for the subsequent evolution of post-Soviet Russia under Yeltsin and subsequently Putin.
Eigonn
Brilliant writing. Long book, but a page turner. Remnick is to be congratulated for a remarkable book. Problem - keeping all those long Russian names in mind. But hey, they were real people to him. Things you thought you knew about the Soviet Union, and things you never suspected. Most interesting 'Lenin made Stalin look like a lamb'. Lenin saw the Bolshevik Revolution as a re-play of the French Revolution, complete with reign of terror, his Red Terror.