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eBook Spain's Men of the Sea: Daily Life on the Indies Fleets in the Sixteenth Century download
History
Author: Pablo E. Perez-Mallaina
ISBN: 0801881838
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 304 pages
Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press (March 31, 2005)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 468
ePUB size: 1783 kb
FB2 size: 1983 kb
DJVU size: 1622 kb
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eBook Spain's Men of the Sea: Daily Life on the Indies Fleets in the Sixteenth Century download

by Pablo E. Perez-Mallaina


In the sixteenth century, Spain's control over its vast New World empire depended on the sailors and officers who . Pérez-Mallaína writes in an easily read style, often humorous and wry, that makes this book, unlike many a dry history tome, a pleasure to read.

In the sixteenth century, Spain's control over its vast New World empire depended on the sailors and officers who manned the galleons and merchant vessels of its Atlantic fleets. Pérez-Mallaína supports his colourful narrative with ample examples of cases found in the archives, cases of human frailty, human greed, and human resilience.

Pérez-Mallaína paints a bleak picture of life at sea and its physical and mental effect on seamen and passengers alike. They enjoyed surprising power for common men, but the world was changing. The seafaring life was defined by cramped quarters, abominable food, seasickness, vermin infestation, and disease. More frightening still was the threat of shipwreck and assault by corsairs and pirates that accompanied all sea voyages.

Pablo E. Perez-Mallaina. Spain's Men of the Sea: Daily Life on the Indies Fleets in the Sixteenth Century. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. Perez, the director of the Department of American Studies at the University of Seville, wrote this work on the occasion of the quincentenary celebration of Christopher Columbus's 1492 voyage of discovery, intending it for a Spanish-speaking audience knowledgeable with the broad outlines of the age.

Spain's Men of the Sea: Daily Life on the Indies Fleets in the 16th Century, Pablo E. Pérez-Mallaína^Bueno. John Hopkins University Press, Mönchhaldenstr. 28, Stuttgart 70191 (1998), 0-8018-5746-5. cle{O, title {Spain's Men of the Sea: Daily Life on the Indies Fleets in the 16th Century, Pablo E. P{'e}rez-Malla{'i}na^Bueno. John Hopkins University Press, M{"o}nchhaldenstr. 28, Stuttgart 70191 (1998), 0-8018-5746-5}, author {Francisco Contente Domingues}, journal {International Journal of Nautical Archaeology}, year {1999}, volume {28} }.

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Parker, Geoffrey, 2000. By Pablo E. Pérez-Mallaína. Translated by Carla Rahn Phillips. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

The sea also looked more promising to the oppressed, the rejected, and the .

The sea also looked more promising to the oppressed, the rejected, and the persecuted. Ironically, PÆ'rez-Malla'na reports that the seaman of Spain had more rights than the English sailor of a later period. The boomtown Spanish seaport of Seville in the 16th century is the subject of this colorful study. Seville attracted adventurers, shipbuilders, tradesmen, and mariners from Iberia and elsewhere to exploit the known Atlantic route to the New World often favored by fair winds and currents. In Spain's Men of the Sea, Pablo E. Perez-Mallaina paints a stunning portrait of daily life aboard the ships of the Spanish Main.

In the sixteenth century, Spain's control over its vast New World empire depended on the sailors and officers who manned the galleons and merchant vessels of its Atlantic fleets. In Spain's Men of the Sea, Pablo E. Pérez-Mallaína paints a stunning portrait of daily life aboard the ships of the Spanish Main. With a novelist's eye for both detail and drama, Pérez-Mallaína evokes the golden age of seafaring in this thoroughly researched and generously illustrated account.

Spain's Men of the Sea begins in Seville, the gateway to the New World. One of Europe's most cosmopolitan cities, Seville attracted people and goods from around the world. From Seville, Pérez-Mallaína follows the Spanish fleets to the West Indies ports of San Juan de Ulda, Veracruz, Cartagena, Nombre de Dios, Portobelo, and Havana. He profiles the men and boys who went to sea―from the scions of seafaring dynasties and fugitives from justice to the orphans and destitute children apprenticed into service as cabin boys. Some signed on because of family tradition, more signed on because of the lure of New World treasure or simply to obtain free passage to the Americas. Most sailors were poorly paid, but the more enterprising among them supplemented their meager wages by small-scale trade or smuggling. Pérez-Mallaína also describes relations among the ship owners, officers, and crews, and traces the intervention of the Spanish government in disputes over pay and cases of insubordination and mistreatment.

Pérez-Mallaína paints a bleak picture of life at sea and its physical and mental effect on seamen and passengers alike. The seafaring life was defined by cramped quarters, abominable food, seasickness, vermin infestation, and disease. More frightening still was the threat of shipwreck and assault by corsairs and pirates that accompanied all sea voyages. Not surprisingly, most sailors were highly superstitious, and Pérez-Mallaína closes his vivid study with an exploration of their unorthodox religious beliefs, which combined Christian and pagan elements. A significant contribution to maritime history, Spain's Men of the Sea also succeeds as a compelling tale of everyday life and death in the maritime community.

"Pérez-Mallaína writes well and has an engaging sense of humor. The work is richly illustrated, and the illustrations, including many color plates, are well chosen... This book should appeal to all aficionados of the romance of the sea as well as to specialists in Spanish and Latin American colonial history."―Benjamin Keen, author of A History of Latin America

Malarad
No, it's not about the latest hybrid economy car. This is an excellent, scholarly, yet quite readable, study of sailors during the Age of Discovery. Covers every aspect of life at sea: who the sailors were, what they ate, where they slept, what they wore and more. If you can't find an answer to your question about anything maritime in this book you won't find it anywhere. A great companion to stories about Columbus, Magellan, the Armada, conquistadors, even pirates or the sea dogs of the Tudor fleet.
Bele
This is a Must-Read for re-enactors and historians in the USA with an interest in the maritime history of the Caribbean, Gulf Coast, and our Southeast Atlantic sea frontiers. Most of the time, we hear and read the seapower struggles of the colonial era told from the British imperial point of view, or from the view that canonizing pirates. But what if it were you, trying to figure out a system to protect your territories and trade from rivals and scurrilous sea-raiders? Here are the fascinating day-to-day details, given from the Other Side of the Story -- that of the empire of Spain, now accessible to folks who only read English. A great read!
elektron
A well translated edition of an interesting and entertainingly researched book on a world largely ignored by American schools. The last chapters could use some editing to tighten the prose.
Onnell
If you're on this page, this is the book you're looking for, period. Excellent translation, lots of pictures, touches every conceivable subject, has enough gore for the most morbidly curious soul. I took off a star only because it was so expensive!

(Sensitive people might want to skip the punishments for poor homosexuals, though there are some heroic tales.)
Opilar
I rarely read about naval history, but I got the book after it was recommended to me. I did not regret it; actually I think it was one of the best buys I did during the year. One of those few books that you read and when you are done you hoped it had 100 more pages, not because something it's missing, but because you don't want the fun to be gone.
Tar
This is one of my favorite references books on 16th century Spain. Since I gave mine to someoneI ordered a replacement copy. It not only details life aboard ship but also offers glimpses of how women financed and participated in the expeditions to the new world. Highly recommend this book for those interested in the history of American conquest and colonization.
Ballalune
To every person that wishes to know more about other cultures, times and people, this book is going to be very refreshing. When Spain was on its way to be the first nation of the world, it is funny to realize how they did not care about the infraestructure, and even though the author does not say in a direct way, one can see why the british empire and later the american had a better and longer success. You learn about all the legal problems people found to travel to the new world when they belong to the Spanish Kingdom compare with the benefits of travelling that british and people from the Lower Countries had. The lack of interest in achieving improvements in the ships and ports even though the business was running away from Spain more and more. The lack of preparation, studies and developing a good infraestructure in the new world to be able to handle all the commerce and traffic that ironicaly was reporting high benefits for them (remember everybody was jellous and afraid of Spain's growing power)and would have made them a very powerful empire had they just care a little bit and organize it some more. Nonetheless, the book is very informative about and era and the people who lived in it. Details and anecqdotes are well research. One gets the feeling of what it was like living in those times. The book is also good when it does the description of the ships itself and its inhabitants. The life conditions onboard, nutrition, entertaiment-every kind of entertaiment-, and other that will be of the amusement of the reader. Interesting people on board of the vessels, I might say.
I also learnt about navigation laws and costumes of the times, and it all added to the value of the lecture.
What the book missed-always from my perspective- is a little portray or description of the country, europe and what was happening around those times, and yet, that does not take anything from the book, and one can still see why Spain did not achieve much more than what it actually did.
This book was a good complement of "The Mediterranean and the mediterranean world in Age of Phillip the Second" by Fernad Braudel. That book is soo good, that i wanted to keep reading about it, and wanted to go deep into some areas. When one compare the seamen from Spain and from Engand the difference is so obvious.
A good and entertaining book for every history "lover" like myself.
To the reviewer who says that Spain did not achieve much:

Spain did not accomplish more than it did? Well actually it ran an overseas Empire that remained practically intact from the end of the XV century to the first decades of the XIX century, that is much longer than the French or the Dutch Empires and when it comes to America more than the English Empire ( which lasted just from Jamestown in 1607 to the American war of independence and the Treaty of Paris in 1783) Today more than 400 million people speak Spanish and belong to a cultural area known as the Hispanic world...not a small feat it seems to me.