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eBook Foreign Affections: Essays on Edmund Burke (Critical Conditions: Field Day Essays and Monographs) download
History
Author: Seamus Deane
ISBN: 0268025703
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 216 pages
Publisher University of Notre Dame Press; 1 edition (February 28, 2005)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 357
ePUB size: 1917 kb
FB2 size: 1194 kb
DJVU size: 1770 kb
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eBook Foreign Affections: Essays on Edmund Burke (Critical Conditions: Field Day Essays and Monographs) download

by Seamus Deane


Foreign Affections: Essays on Edmund Burke. Critical Conditions: Field Day Essays and Monographs. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005.

Foreign Affections: Essays on Edmund Burke.

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Critical Conditions: Field Day Essays and Monographs. University of Notre Dame Press.

The issues of liberty and empire, faction and revolution, universality, equality, authority, sectarian vice and democratic virtue are central here. Dominating them all is the question of how traditional feeling and affection can be retained within the revolutionary and colonial worlds that emerged at the close of the eighteenth century.

University of Notre Dame Press in Association with Field Day (2005). Edmund Burke on Government, Politics, and Society. Edmund Burke - 1976 - International Publications Service. This article has no associated abstract. The Portable Edmund Burke. Edmund Burke - 1999 - Penguin Books. Reflections with Edmund Burke. Edmund Burke - 1960 - New York: Vantage Press.

Essays and criticism on Edmund Burke - Introduction

Essays and criticism on Edmund Burke - Introduction. Rejecting revolutionary change predicated on a facile faith in individual will, Burke held a particular disdain for Jean Jacques Rousseau, who argued that all rights and liberties were inherent in individuals in a pre-social state, and that political allegiance was a voluntary exercise that could be revoked if the state no longer served the general will of the people.

Essays on Edmund Burke. Published: February 2005. Present Lasts a Long Time. Essays in Cultural Politics. Aspects of the Concepts of ‘Right’ and ‘Freedom’ in Irish. Published: March 1999. Radicalism, Catholicism, and the Construction of Irish Identity, 1760-1830. Published: December 1998.

Book Condition: Used: Good. This innovative collection of essays views Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the present day, covering a wide range of topics and authors. Synopsis: This innovative collection of essays views Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the present day, covering a wide range of topics and authors. Among the writers are Bishop Berkeley, Thomas Moore, Oliver Goldsmith, Francis Hutcheson, Laurence Sterne, Richard Steele, Edmund Burke, Maria Edgeworth, W. B. Yeats, Samuel Beckett, James Stephens, Charles Lever, Austin Clarke, Kate O'Brien and Francis Stuart. List this Seller's Books.

This intriguing collection of essays is dominated by the figure of Edmund Burke and by accounts of the ways in which he and some of those he influenced understood the revolutionary changes that produced the modern world. The issues of liberty and empire, faction and revolution, universality, equality, authority, sectarian vice and democratic virtue are central here. Dominating them all is the question of how traditional feeling and affection can be retained within the revolutionary and colonial worlds that emerged at the close of the eighteenth century. The answers to these questions emerge from the different interpretations of the American and French Revolutions that were to be so influential for generations after Burke. In addition, he posed the colonial question in Ireland before it was posed more generally. Was liberty compatible with colonial rule? Ultimately, Burke secured his position by his condemnation of colonial as well as revolutionary violence. But in the works of Burke’s contemporaries, especially deTocqueville and Acton, colonial atrocity is condoned or supported while revolutionary violence is condemned out of hand. This, it is argued here, is constitutive of the European anti-revolutionary position which Burke helped to create but to which he nevertheless remains alien.