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eBook Operation Typhoon: Hitler's March on Moscow, October 1941 download
History
Author: David Stahel
ISBN: 1107035120
Subcategory: Europe
Pages 429 pages
Publisher Cambridge University Press; First edition. edition (March 29, 2013)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 379
ePUB size: 1845 kb
FB2 size: 1416 kb
DJVU size: 1147 kb
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eBook Operation Typhoon: Hitler's March on Moscow, October 1941 download

by David Stahel


In October 1941 Hitler launched Operation Typhoon the German drive to capture Moscow and knock the Soviet .

In October 1941 Hitler launched Operation Typhoon the German drive to capture Moscow and knock the Soviet Union out of the wa. Dr. Stahel's latest book Operation Typhoon was released by Cambridge University Press in March 2013 and will be followed by another book focusing on German operations on the eastern front in November and early December 1941. David Stahel completed his undergraduate studies at Monash University and Boston College.

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resistance, or Hitler’s interference. Stahel argues for a more nuanced and comprehensive approach (299)

resistance, or Hitler’s interference. Stahel argues for a more nuanced and comprehensive approach (299). Operation Typhoon follows from two preceding Stahel books detailing the organization and execution of Operation Barbarossa and the battle of Kiev: Operation Barbarossa and Germany’s Defeat in the East (2009), and Kiev 1941: Hitler’s Battle for Supremacy in the East (2011). Stahel’s narrative here is tied primarily to Army Group Centre and its commander, Field Marshal Fedor von Bock, who in the period in question had under his command nearly . million soldiers (300).

Stahel's third book on Germany's 1941 Russian campaign demonstrates that focus on the operational level led to. .

Stahel's third book on Germany's 1941 Russian campaign demonstrates that focus on the operational level led to ignoring strategic considerations. Emphasis on force of will encouraged overlooking material problems.

In October 1941 Hitler launched Operation Typhoon the German drive to capture Moscow and knock the Soviet . Germany's hopes of final victory depended on the success of the October offensive but the autumn conditions and the stubborn resistance of the Red Army ensured that the capture of Moscow was anything but certain.

Электронная книга "Operation Typhoon: Hitler's March on Moscow, October 1941", David Stahel

Электронная книга "Operation Typhoon: Hitler's March on Moscow, October 1941", David Stahel. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Operation Typhoon: Hitler's March on Moscow, October 1941" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Do you want to read the rest of this article?

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Operation Typhoon: Hitler s March on Moscow, October 1941 download pdf myebookpdf.

David Stahel (born 1975 in Wellington, New Zealand) is a historian, author . Hitler's March on Moscow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2013).

David Stahel (born 1975 in Wellington, New Zealand) is a historian, author and senior lecturer in history at the University of New South Wales. Stahel authored several books on the military operations on the Eastern Front, including Operation Barbarossa, the Battle of Kiev (1941) and the Battle of Moscow; all books were published by Cambridge University Press. The Battle for Moscow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2015).

In October 1941 Hitler launched Operation Typhoon the German drive to capture Moscow and knock the Soviet Union out of the war. As the last chance to escape the dire implications of a winter campaign, Hitler directed seventy-five German divisions, almost two million men and three of Germany's four panzer groups into the offensive, resulting in huge victories at Viaz'ma and Briansk - among the biggest battles of the Second World War. David Stahel's groundbreaking new account of Operation Typhoon captures the perspectives of both the German high command and individual soldiers, revealing that despite success on the battlefield the wider German war effort was in far greater trouble than is often acknowledged. Germany's hopes of final victory depended on the success of the October offensive but the autumn conditions and the stubborn resistance of the Red Army ensured that the capture of Moscow was anything but certain.
Rare
The author extends his strategic coverage of his two previous books by covering Operation Typhoon with the same logic, flair and extensive research of those books.
To my surprise this book covers only the fighting and command decisions of October which primarily included the pocket battles of Vyazma and Bryansk while the next book will be devoted to the final advance on Moscow, ending on December 5th.(I'm hoping Mr Stahel will then write about the German defense of Zhukov's counter offensive.)

As a prelude to the main story, a recap of Operation Barbarossa and Guderian's run to Kiev is presented to bring the reader up to speed. A brief historical military summary of Germany going back to the 12th century is also given that includes the influence of Clausewitz Theory has on German commanders. Napoleon's attempts to conquer Russia also plays heavy on Hitler and other key officers. As usual the German perspective concerning operational, strategic and political aspects drive the narrative.

Also as usual, the author has performed a tremendous amount of research for he covers Operation Typhoon on a daily basis and include many battle facts on individual corps and divisions along with their respective commanders as they struggle to close and eliminate the pockets at Vyazma and Bryansk while 3rd PzA heads for Kalinin. In addition to showing the fanatical resistance of the Soviets in trying to escape their doom, Mr Stahel also clearly shows how disgruntled German commanders fought among themselves, a delusional OKH that wouldn't see the severity of fighting for what it was, rainy weather, impossible muddy roads, terrible logistics and lack of fuel would bring the German Army to an abrupt halt by the end of October. The AGC had not fully recovered from the fighting in August and September and with the casualties of October was in no position to tackle Moscow in 1941, especially in the disposition OKH had ordered. Forging a salient from Kalinin to Tula all the way to Moscow was just too unreasonable.

Once again it is shown that regardless of "winning battles", the German Army with its own problems and its inability to see the true cost of those victories were over extending themselves, suffering too many casualties and making too many strategic errors that would prevent the capture of Moscow in 1941 or ever. On the other side of the ledger, its shown how thousands of Russians escaped the pockets to fight another day as well as the stubborn resistance within the pockets that caused the Germans until almost the end of October to eliminate the pockets and devote their full attention on moving on Moscow. This resistance gave Zhukov time to improve defenses and bring reserves up to the line in sufficient levels to stop the Germans in early December. Though the coverage is predominately German, there is still sufficient coverage of Soviet responses, especially when Zhukov is in sector for the reader to have a good understanding of the overall campaign. It is clearly shown that in many local battles at the pockets and at Kalinin that the Soviets actually halted the German advance while causing massive casualties.

I believe the book is further enhanced in describing the operation and the positional stance of the author that the Germans were bleeding themselves white while advancing toward Moscow by the careful selection of excerpts from primary documents and the hundreds of first hand accounts chosen to back up his positions.

In addition to the excellent overview, the author presents 15 detailed maps drawn by David Glantz that show divisional deployments and progress. The series of maps clearly show the quick envelopment of Vyazma and Bryansk in the first week of the operation and then the subsequent slowing of the advance due to a myriad of reasons. The maps will definitely aid the reader in following the narrative and Mr Stahel includes map references on some of the key battles, letting the reader move quickly to the proper map. The book also includes a few tables and photos, a 67 page Notes Section and an impressive Bibliography of primary and secondary sources. The book closes with an Index. This material is invaluable if further study is desired.

Operation Typhoon dovetails logically with the author's two earlier books in both battlefield strategy as well as the economic and political arenas and if you enjoyed those books, you'll definitely enjoy this book. And if you haven't read those earlier books, the first chapter summarizes and will give you sufficient background knowledge so you won't miss a beat reading this book.

I find Mr Stahel's writing style interesting and effective; I find the story development and premise logical and hard to dispute. This book along with the author's earlier books provide key insight into the war and I highly recommend this book to all students of the Russo-German War.
from earth
The title of this book is somewhat misleading. It is really about the Battle of Bryansk-Vyazma in October 1941, a gigantic double encirclement battle which was the second biggest German victory of the war, after the Battle of Kiev in September. The book's title should really have called attention to that fact, because there are very, very few books in English on Bryansk-Vyazma. The book thus fills an important gap in the literature.

I criticized his previous book, on Kiev, for not being tightly focused on its subject, and for having poor maps. I am happy to say this book does NOT have those problems. He sets the stage in his first tightly written chapter by describing what happened in the USSR from June to October, and the majority of the book focuses on October. The maps, once again from David Glantz, cover the battle of Bryansk-Vyazma in close detail (eleven maps for a four week period!) and are of high quality.

Some other reviewers write that Stahel is continuing the same themes from his previous books. This is true to some extent, but there is actually no reason to expect the same Army, under the same leadership, to be radically different in October than it was in August and September. Even given that his view of the fundamental problems of the German Army is much the same in this book as the previous ones, there is certainly enough new material in here on the actual operations in October to justify a new book.

Stahel concludes that the Germans won a tactical and operational victory but could not translate this into strategic success. The German Army won a battle, but could not win the war. He also notes that the Soviets were preparing a defense-in-depth of Moscow itself, meaning that if the Germans had reached the city in October or November, they would not have taken it easily, but would have been bogged down in protracted, draining urban combat.

He notes the German propaganda campaign in October, which announced that "Russia is beaten, and the Red Army is annihilated", only set up the German population for a huge disappointment when the Wehrmacht did not take Moscow after all, and the war continued. Finally, although the main perspective of the book is that of the strategic and operational commanders, he includes perspectives from the front line soldiers (which mainly serves to indicate that the higher headquarters were living in a fantasy world).

In conclusion, this is Stahel's best one yet, and a worthy addition to any collection of books on the Eastern Front.