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eBook Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II download
History
Author: Mark Johnston
ISBN: 0521119952
Subcategory: Australia & Oceania
Pages 240 pages
Publisher Cambridge University Press; Reissue edition (September 24, 2009)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 497
ePUB size: 1802 kb
FB2 size: 1559 kb
DJVU size: 1989 kb
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eBook Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II download

by Mark Johnston


Request PDF On Jan 1, 2002, David Day and others published Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their .

A method was developed during World War II for special military needs, to delay the usual manifestations of staleness brought about by the storage of the plain type of bread used by the British Army. The active ingredient employed was a mixture of paraffin wax and bees-wax added to wheat flour to make a fine powder, which was incorporated into the main body of the flour before making the dough.

Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ; Stanley, Peter (2002). Alamein: The Australian Story. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Fighting the Enemy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Fighting the Enemy is about men with the job of killing each other  . Start by marking Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In the Boer War Britain highly valued the Australians for their ability to fight the Boers on their own terms . In Vietnam the Aussies fought a large battle of Long Tan where they were hugely outnumbered but fought off the enemy.

In the Boer War Britain highly valued the Australians for their ability to fight the Boers on their own terms, that is for their horsemanship, role as mounted infantry and fighting in ‘the bush’. There was also a high profile case of Breaker Morant where POWs were shot (more)Loadin. Other aspects of Australian army tradition are associated with hooliganism, a rough sense of humour, and disrespect for officers.

If you've read at any length about World War II combat this book will have few real surprises for you, though it is a nice little monograph that does bring together an interesting collection of anecdotes and observations. I personally found the chapter dealing with the attitudes of Australian troops towards being in combat with Vichy French forces in the Levant to be of most interest, if only for the relative novelty. Shrike58, August 15, 2008.

oceedings{, title {Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II, Mark Johnston}, author {David French}, year {2001} }. David French.

Johnston makes a novel, interesting and impeccably well-written contribution to the corpus of literature on the .

Johnston makes a novel, interesting and impeccably well-written contribution to the corpus of literature on the Australian soldier's Second World War. He does an excellent job of answering his principal question: rebutting the 'Anzac myth' through detailed examination of contemporaneous attitudes. Cambridge University Press should be commended for producing an attractive volume including a good number of photographs and some decent maps. The book examines the relationships between Australians and their allies and also how they related to the local people: Greeks, Egyptians, Syrians, Lebanese and Palestinians.

This book recounts the organization and deployment of one of the most important fighting armies of World War II. Australian divisions made a large and distinctive contribution to victory both in the deserts of the Middle East and the jungles of the South-West Pacific,earning for the second. Australian divisions made a large and distinctive contribution to victory both in the deserts of the Middle East and the jungles of the South-West Pacific,earning for the second time a unique reputation for aggressiveness, endurance and independence of spirit. The text is illustrated with original wartime photos from all fronts; and with full colour plates showing a wide range of uniforms and gear, together with the complex and colourful Australian system of unit insignia.

Quoted in Mark Johnston, Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000 . In: The Fifth Column in World War II. Palgrave Macmillan, London. 1057/9781137506672 6. oogle Scholar. 29. Lionel Wigmore, The Japanese Thrust ( Canberra: Australian War Memorial, 1957 ), p. 16. 31. Alan Warren, Britain’s Greatest Defeat: Singapore 1942 ( London: Continuum, 2006 ), p. 8. Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, London. Print ISBN 978-1-349-57545-9. Online ISBN 978-1-137-50667-2. eBook Packages Palgrave History Collection.

Mark Johnston, Illustrated by Carlos Chagas At Bardia in Libya in January 1941, soldiers like these men of the Second Australian Imperial Force established a new tradition for the Australian Army.

Mark Johnston, Illustrated by Carlos Chagas. In World War I the all-volunteer Australian Imperial Force had first won fame in the ill-fated Gallipoli campaign of 1915. On the Western Front in 1916–18 the AIF came to be employed as an elite force; it contributed substantially to Allied victory and garnered numerous honours and decorations, but at the cost of appalling losses. At Bardia in Libya in January 1941, soldiers like these men of the Second Australian Imperial Force established a new tradition for the Australian Army.

Fighting the Enemy is about men with the job of killing each other. Based on the wartime writings of hundreds of Australian front-line soldiers during World War II, this powerful and resonant book contains many moving descriptions of high emotion and drama. Soldiers' interactions with their enemies are central to war, and their attitudes to their adversaries are crucial to the way wars are fought. This book is an unprecedented and thorough examination of the way Australian combat soldiers interacted with troops from the four powers engaged in World War II.
Rainpick
The Australian army served on both sides of the world and against a total of four enemies; the Italians, the Vichy French, the Germans and of course the Japanese. While ultimately finishing on the winning side everywhere, there were reverses and disasters. This book explores the Australian soldier’s attitudes to those enemies, across those situations.

It must be remembered that many Australian soldiers were volunteers, who had grown up on the epic stories of their predecessors in the First World War. They were proud, even arrogant and it mattered greatly to them, as to how they ‘went’ against their opponents. Johnston explores this through their letters and accounts in their unit and general histories. The bulk of these concern the desert fighting of the 6th Division against the Italians and the epic battles of Tobruk and Alamain by the 9th against both the Germans and Italians. There is a smattering of material on the brief Greek campaign and slightly more on the battle for Crete and the Syrian campaign against the Vichy French. About half the book looks at battle against the Japanese in the Pacific.

The nature of the book means that there is rather more on actual fighting than usual. Victories were ascribed to Australian soldiery qualities and defeats to opposition quantity and support arms. Ironically, when the tables were turned later in the war, these same considerations were often absent. Interestingly, the most many soldiers saw of the enemy was as POWs, so there is quite a bit on observations made here. There is also more humanity on display. The way the Australians rated their opponents as well as themselves is quite interesting. There is a professional element but also at times a racial or racist aspect, especially concerning the Japanese whose conduct often bewildered or outraged the Australians. There are also brief chapters on how these enemies regarded Australians as soldiers.

The author has researched extensively for this book. Even so, it only numbers about 140 pages of text. This points to the limits of surviving correspondence and primary sources. I wonder whether interviews with surviving veterans might’ve helped extend this to any advantage? Personally I found the material on battle with the Germans most interesting. There is nothing on actions against the 1st SS in Greece but decent chapters regarding the Africa Corps and to a lessor degree the paras on Crete. Altogether though, it is a fascinating subject and I wish it had been twice as long!
Debeme
Fighting the Enemy is a vitally important addition to any historical survey of WW2 in that it focuses specifically on the Australian fighting man and his foe. This superb volume draws in detail from personal accounts of Italian, German, Vichy France and Japanese soldiers, as well as the Australians themselves. The central theme examines the perceptions and attitudes of the Australian soldier by his enemies and likewise those of the Australian soldier towards them.

These accounts are based on the writings of hundreds of Australian front line troops during WWII from North Africa, Middle East, Mediterranean and Pacific theaters. In each chapter we get a break down of the interactions between Axis and Allied Australian forces in battle, often seen through the eyes of POW's from both sides of the conflict.

We find out why the Australians considered the Italian soldier almost ridiculous and why the Italian soldiers were said to be terrified by the reputation of the Aussies. We gain insight into the perceptions of German commanders towards the Australian forces - Rommel himself believed the Australians were the Elite forces of the British Commonwealth and among the Germans the Australian Soldier was greatly feared and respected. What unfolds between the Afrika Korps and the Aussies is a tacit mutual respect and esprit de corps rarely found anywhere else during WW2.

In one passage we hear ...

"An Australian in another battalion reported that a German prisoner he met in 1942 claimed that the Australians had gone home, but that the English troops continued to `dress up as Australians to frighten us'

In another ...

"Early in the siege, the German Commander, Rommel, described Australians as `fighting magnificently' and showing `remarkable tenacity'.

Throughout the book we are treated to moments of great humour and levity between the various forces in spite of the terrible actions they were involved in. Truces between the Germans and Australians to collect the dead and wounded are examined and discussed and quickly forgotten when punctuated with resumed shelling.

While I have featured the Western Desert conflict in this review the section on the Pacific conflict with the Japanese is no less riveting and in some ways far more serious in nature. Australia was now defending it's own nation in the same way Britain was defending itself. One Australian account tells of a soldier who felt respectful ambivalence towards the German soldiers he faced in North Africa, Crete and Greece, but when it came to the Japanese it was outright hatred - knowing he now fought off an invasion.. He comments, "Now I know how the British feel about the Germans".

The writing of Mark Johnston is both powerful in its execution and yet completely accessible for any reader. There is no lack of documentation punctuated by excellent black and white plates and yet the writing never bogs down into dry historical data. I found myself almost through the half the book in one sitting and could hardly put it down.

This is a rare and important work of WW2 history and something that should be on the shelves of all those with a serious interest in understanding the Australian contribution in this war.