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eBook The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe download
History
Author: Chet Raymo
ISBN: 0802714021
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 208 pages
Publisher Walker Books; 1st edition (March 1, 2003)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 176
ePUB size: 1636 kb
FB2 size: 1217 kb
DJVU size: 1700 kb
Other formats: lrf doc azw txt

eBook The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe download

by Chet Raymo


Start by marking The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The least things in Raymo's universe occur on a one-mile path he has walked every day for 37 years between .

The least things in Raymo's universe occur on a one-mile path he has walked every day for 37 years between his home and his office in North Easton, Mass. Along this path that he knows so well, he writes, "every pebble and wildflower has a story to tell"-geological stories, environmental stories, human stories. The path takes me along a street of century-old houses, through woods and fields, across a stream, along a water meadow, and through an old orchard and community gardens. Raymo, professor emeritus of physics and astronomy at Stonehill College and a science writer at the Boston Globe, walks with an observant eye and a ruminative mind.

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For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has walked a one-mile path from his house in North Easton, Massachusetts, to the Stonehill College . A Beautiful Walk Through Life With Prof. Raymo! By Thriftbooks. com User, May 5, 2005.

For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has walked a one-mile path from his house in North Easton, Massachusetts, to the Stonehill College campus where he has taught. Chet Raymo, a physics and astronomy professor at Stonehill College, poetically and lyrically takes us on a "stroll" with him while he walks from his home in North Easton, Massachusetts to the college campus. He has walked this path for 37 years and by careful observation of the forested landscape, he has garnered an eternities worth of insights.

For almost forty years, Chet Raymo has walked a one-mile path from his house to the college where he taught, chronicling the universe he has found through observing every detail of his route with a scientist's curiosity, a historian's respect for the past, and a child's capacity for wonder.

Back to Our Shelves . The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe. Here Raymo seeks-and finds-the laws of nature and the existential problems of man hidden under every leaf and rock, or caught in the murmur of running wate. hat history is hidden outside your front door? -Los Angeles Times For almost forty years, Chet Raymo walked a one-mile path from his house to the college where he taught, chronicling the universe. by observing every detail of his route with a scientist’s curiosity, a historian’s respect for the past, and a child’s capacity for wonder.

A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe. Published March 1, 2003 by Walker & Company. FOR THIRTY-SEVEN YEARS I have walked the same path back and forth each day from my home in the village of North Easton, Massachusetts, to my place of work, Stonehill College.

The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe, by Chet Raymo, is one of the most . Chet Raymo is a scientist, a thinker and a consummate inquirer.

The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe, by Chet Raymo, is one of the most fascinating books you’ll ever read. Everything excites him, draws his attention and I suspect threatens to distract him from his real job as professor emeritus of physics and astronomy at Stonehill College. Every morning, he walks to work along a course that covers approximately one mile. Having the type of mind he has, he can’t help but muse over every building, every smell, each part of his journey. It is in this book that he records his musings.

For nearly forty years, Chet Raymo has walked a one-mile path from his house in North Easton, Massachusetts, to the Stonehill College campus where he has taught physics and astronomy. The woods, meadows, and stream he passes are as familiar to him as his own backyard, yet each day he finds something new. "Every pebble and wildflower has a story to tell," Raymo says.

In The Path, Raymo chronicles the universe he has found by closely observing every detail of his route. He connects the local to the global, the microscopic to the galactic, with a scientists's curiosity, a historian's respect for the past, a child's capacity for wonder. With each step, the landscape he traverses becomes richer and more multidimensional, opening door after door into astromnomy, geology, biology, history, and literaure.

"The flake of granite in the path was once at the core of towering mountains pushed up across New England when continents collided," he writes. "The purple loosestrife beside the stream emigrated from Europe in the 1800s as a garden ornamental, then went wantonly native in a land of wild frontiers. The light from the star Arcturus I see reflected in the brook beneath the bridge at night has been traveling across space for forty years before entering my eye. I have attended to all of these stories and tried to hear what the landscape has to say .... I have attended, too, to language. How did the wood anemone and Sheep Pasture get their names? What does the queset of Queset Brook signify in the language of Native Americans? Scratch a name in a landscape, and history bubbles up like a spring."

The path also reveals the stories of nineteenth-century industrialists who transformed natural resources into power, and turn-of-the-century landscape architects, such as Frederick Law Olmsted, who championed an ideal of nature tamed by conscious intent. In its transformations over the centuries, Raymo writes, the path "encapsulates in many surprising ways the history of our nation and of our fickle love affair with the natural world."

Recognizing that his path is commonplace, and that we all have such routes in our lives, Raymo urges us to walk attentively, stopping often to watch and listen with care. His wisdom and insights inspire us to turn local paths-- whether through cities, suburbs, or rural areas-- into doorways to greater understanding of nature and history.

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Chet Raymo, a physics and astronomy professor at Stonehill College, poetically and lyrically takes us on a "stroll" with him while he walks from his home in North Easton, Massachusetts to the college campus. He has walked this path for 37 years and by careful observation of the forested landscape, he has garnered an eternities worth of insights. One is immediately reminded or the keen observations and musings of Henry David Thoreau and John Muir, et al. "The Path" is written in an uncomplicated, approachable style for all audiences, and yet deep with wisdom and knowledge producing a broad spectrum view of the workings of the world.

And from Raymo's musings, we see the history of the Stonehill region come to life and how it has shaped the lives of generations of people, the flora/fauna and the "natural" landscape with special attention to the early entrepreneurs who most influenced the region, their motivations of nation building, personal wealth and the current display of their legacies.

We get an over-view of geologic transformations, biological processes, and the building blocks of all physical manifestations through the coding of DNA strands. The interconnectedness of all life and our tinkering with nature resulting in such side-effects and backlashes as global warming and broken down natural resource distribution cycles.

From the wintertime stroll, we get observations of: "The tiny six-pointed snowflake is, on a deeper level, a buzzing hive of molecular vibrations. And so, too, the lush diversity of life in the water meadow, examined more closely, resolves itself into a fandango of dancing molecules. The seen is a mask for the unseen. Our eyes open at birth to a flood of photons, but we must learn to see." (p. 146)

The careful observations of nature in action through all four seasons from a stroll on this path creates a summation of our evolving human relation to life on the planet in such thoughts as: "Knowledge once gained cannot be unlearned, and knowledge is power. For better or worse, the future of the planet has been handed to us, not by a deity but by fate. Stewardship of other creature is in our hands." "...an understanding of the ecological wholeness of the Earth suggest that our altruism should extend to other creatures, too: plants, animals, even microbes." And, "Environmental conservation-clean water and air, a steady climate- is in the interest of our species." (p. 171)

This is a beautiful melding of the thoughts and observations of such greats as the sociobiologist, E. O. Wilson, "The Future of Life", Thomas Berry, "The Dream of the Earth", et al. who are all in unison with the profound need for humanity to seriously embrace an ethic of life stewardship for the survival of our beautiful blue planet Earth. Thank you again, Prof. Chet Raymo!
Scoreboard Bleeding
One of my favorite books. Nature oriented and very interesting; thought provoking and well written.
Magis
I really enjoyed his "Walking Zero" and "Skeptics", but this one was just dry enough that I found myself losing interest. It's a bit less focussed than the other two books mentioned.
Whitehammer
Thank you.
in waiting
Chet Raymo has done it again. He can take a scene that looks familiar and average to most of us and make it into a a wide path of connected thoughts. His eclectic nature defines a life more full than what most of us know. Thanks Mr. Raymo for making something invisible right there before our eyes.
kewdiepie
Everybody should read this book. Chet Raymo writes so well. I have purchased this book 5 times so I could pass it along to friends
Blackseeker
Very enjoyable and informative reading. If you like books about
nature and science you'll like this very much.
Wonderful and inspiring book regarding our world God created and wants us to care for.