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eBook Trade Union Gospel: Christianity and Labor in Industrial Philadelphia, 1865-1915 (American Civilization) download
History
Author: Ken Fones-Wolf
ISBN: 0877226520
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 260 pages
Publisher Temple Univ Pr; 1st edition (January 1, 1990)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 733
ePUB size: 1947 kb
FB2 size: 1478 kb
DJVU size: 1884 kb
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eBook Trade Union Gospel: Christianity and Labor in Industrial Philadelphia, 1865-1915 (American Civilization) download

by Ken Fones-Wolf


Traces the interaction of religion and the labor movement in Philadelphia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Exploring the ways that Protestantism mediated between the dominant and working-class versions of American society, this work examines the ambiguity of Christianity as a social force in class conflict.

Trade Union Gospel book.

Exploring the ways that Protestantism mediated between the dominant and working-class versions of American society, Ken Fones-Wolf examines the ambiguity of Christianity as a social force in class conflict.

Philadelphia: Temple University Press. xx + 266 pp. - Thomas G. Fuechtmann, Steeples and Stacks: Religion and Steel Crisis in Youngstown. Recommend this journal. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. x + 308 pp. John J. Bukowczyk (a1). International Labor and Working-Class History.

Find nearly any book by Ken Fones-Wolf. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Transnational west virginia: "Ethnic communities and economic change, 1840-1940" (west virginia & appalachia).

Help us improve our Author Pages by updating your bibliography and submitting a new or current image and biography. Learn more at Author Central. Books by Ken Fones-Wolf.

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. There's no description for this book yet.

Published January 1990 by Temple Univ Pr. Written in English. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

With a decisive victory in 1865 over Southern secessionists in the Civil War, the United . The pool of unskilled labor was constantly growing, as unprecedented numbers of immigrants-27

With a decisive victory in 1865 over Southern secessionists in the Civil War, the United States became a united and powerful nation with a strong national government. Reformers wanted to give as many American Indians as possible the opportunity to own and operate their own farms and ranches, and the issue was how to give individual Indians land owned by the tribe. The pool of unskilled labor was constantly growing, as unprecedented numbers of immigrants-27. 5 million between 1865 and 1918 -entered the . Most were young men eager for work.

PDF. Grace Palladino. PDF. Michael J. Birkner.

Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1989. Call Number: Special Collections HD 6519. Grier, George W. The Washington Labor Force: An Asset in a Changing Economy. Call Number: Special Collections HD 5726. Hewes, Laurence Ilsley, Jr.

This study traces the interaction of religion and the labor movement in Philadelphia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Exploring the ways that Protestantism mediated between the dominant and working-class versions of American society, Ken Fones-Wolf examines the ambiguity of Christianity as a social force in class conflict. Using Philadelphia as a case study, he shows that aspects of working-class culture and trade union activism were rooted in Protestantism and that religious feeling was a significant factor of working-class life. While religious values complemented a broad spectrum of political and class positions and helped people adjust to social change, Christianity itself was a dynamic force that adapted to emerging ideas of social responsibility and the jarring disjunctions between old beliefs and new realities. Author note: Ken Fones-Wolf heads the archives and teaches labor history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was formerly Manuscripts Curator at the Urban Archives Center of Temple University.