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eBook The Weather Channel download
History
Author: Frank Batten
ISBN: 1578515599
Subcategory: Americas
Pages 304 pages
Publisher Harvard Business Review Press; 1st edition (May 2, 2002)
Language English
Category: History
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 243
ePUB size: 1466 kb
FB2 size: 1600 kb
DJVU size: 1528 kb
Other formats: rtf azw lrf mobi

eBook The Weather Channel download

by Frank Batten


Frank Batten (February 11, 1927 – September 10, 2009) was a co-founder of the first nationwide, 24-hour cable weather channel, The Weather Channel.

Frank Batten (February 11, 1927 – September 10, 2009) was a co-founder of the first nationwide, 24-hour cable weather channel, The Weather Channel. His media company, Landmark Media Enterprises, once owned nine daily newspapers, more than 50 weekly newspapers, television stations in Las Vegas and Nashville, and a national chain of classified advertising publications.

Former Weather Channel Chairman and CEO Batten recounts the first twenty years of the popular cable network. The cover and pages may be creased from use, but the book will close squarely. There will be no tears

Former Weather Channel Chairman and CEO Batten recounts the first twenty years of the popular cable network. There will be no tears. There are no markings inside or out, with the rare exception of the previous owner's name written inside the cover or on the first page. This is the most common condition we assign to used books.

Frank Batten Sr. (1927–2009) created the Weather Channel in 1982, despite mocking by colleagues in the media that around-the-clock weather broadcasts would be as exciting as watching paint dry. The network.

AUTHORBIO: Frank Batten is the retired Chairman and CEO of Landmark Communications, In. a private media company that owns newspapers, specialty publications, television stations, and The Weather Channel

AUTHORBIO: Frank Batten is the retired Chairman and CEO of Landmark Communications, In. a private media company that owns newspapers, specialty publications, television stations, and The Weather Channel. Jeffrey L. Cruikshank is the founder of The Cruikshank C. In. and the author or coauthor of numerous business books.

The Weather Channel book. In 1982, Frank Batten flipped a switch and began what he called. Most of The Weather Channel concentrates on all the problems Batten and his media company experienced in the early 1980s when they hatched their idea for all-weather programming and struggled to get it on the air. "I'm sure that we tried to do too much, too fast," says Batten, who nevertheless endorses the too-much, too-fast approach: "I'm convinced that if we hadn't acted as aggressively as we did-if we hadn't spent the money, rushed down the road, and pushed ourselves and our partners.

Frank Batten S. the former chairman of a media conglomerate who in 1982 started the Weather Channel, facing down skepticism that many people would watch round-the-clock coverage of rain, wind and temperature, died Thursday in Norfolk, Va. He was 82. The death was confirmed b. . The death was confirmed by Maurice Jones, the publisher of The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, the flagship newspaper of Mr. Batten’s company. Mr. Batten was chairman of Landmark Communications (now Landmark Media Enterprises) from 1967 until 1998.

Weather Channel (Television station : Atlanta, G., Television weathercasting. Foundations - A new idea - Building the data path - Birthing pains - Flirting with extinction - The fast lane - Brand building and other adventures - Disruptive technologies - The Weather Channel in context.

In 2007 Frank Batten was listed as the 190th richest person in the United States, according to Forbes 400, with a net worth of.Frank Batten S. 82: Media Magnate, Philanthropist Launched the Weather Channel". Retrieved September 11, 2009.

Batten owned one of the Chesapeake Bay's largest racing yachts, the Shadow.

Former Weather Channel Chairman and CEO Batten recounts the first twenty years of the popular cable network, discussing the business, technological, and meteorological innovations responsible for its success.

Former Weather Channel Chairman and CEO Batten recounts the first twenty years of the popular cable network, discussing the business, technological, and meteorological innovations responsible for its success.
Jesmi
I've been a friend and admirer of the author for almost thirty years. But I can be objective enough to say that you won't read a better business book this year than The Weather Channel. It tells an amazing story: how a very small company, centered around the newspapers in Norfolk, Va., and Greensboro, N.C., took a gigantic risk. Competing with the largest communications companies, Landmark Communications started one of the first national cable channels. And almost failed (you can't come closer to failing than this one). And, in the end, succeeded gloriously.
Though the impossibly modest author almost paints himself off the stage altogether, you will also meet one of the most decent and admirable executives in American business, Frank Batten. Because Mr. Batten's company is private, almost no one knows of this remarkable man. Although he's reticent about himself (a life-threatening and life-altering cancer that occurred at the time of the Weather Channel launch is dismissed in a paragraph),you'll understand how lucky the citizens of Norfolk and Greensboro have been to have him in charge of their newspapers the last 40 years.
This is a book about business, not weather. But if business interests you at all, it's a hell of a book.
Moswyn
If you were around during the beginning of this it opened up a new era in television watching. You would not have known that a lot of work went into viewing and building the weather channel. I thought a interesting items was that during the early days of cable TV they actually did studies to find out that some people would leave the TV on the static view of temperature, humidity, barometer. So, then, by extension if you continue to view the TV with those three parameters, why not throw in a few maps and make it informative. They did just that, but it wasn't easy!
Jay
As a former fan of TWC, I loved reading about it's origins. Well written by Batten, it covers the channel from it's planning stages to fruition. If only the current TWC (under different ownership) would emphasize weather nowadays, rather than various reality series that are endlessly looped throughout the day. Sigh.
Gela
Didn't really paint a good picture of how the story of the weather channel came to be...it felt bogged down with too much technical information.
Bloodhammer
What is your USP (unique selling proposition)? The Weather Channel is available 24 / 7 and "saves lives." Started by Landmark Communications based on a business plan from noted meteorologist John Coleman, The Weather Channel is a broadcasting success story. This book plods along with the story of the birthing of the service and not a lot of insight into the process beyond good people and a private company's ability to make the kind of long-term investment that paid off with The Weather Channel.
Original
Very well written. Miss the older, better Weather Channel. It was great.
Phalaken
Although I agree with others that tighter editing would have eliminated repetitions and the photos provided should have offered a better visual presentation of the channel's development and (especially) its operations, I still rate this book as highly as I do for several reasons. First, Batten (with Jeffrey L. Cruikshank) provides a compelling analysis of the challenges and problems he and his associates had to overcome to achieve the improbable business success of "a media phenomenon." Also, after having read this book, I had a much better understanding and appreciation of the value of what the Weather Channel now offers in this so-called "Age of Information." What if advanced warnings about severely inclement weather had been easily accessible in years past? How many lives would have been spared from natural disasters such as the hurricane which devastated Galveston Island in 1900?

For many people I personally know (including my wife), the Weather Channel is "must viewing" at the beginning and end of of each day. For them and countless others, it is the modern day equivalent of a crystal ball. For business travelers, which clothing to pack? For parents, what should the children wear to school? For those about to be involved in an outdoor activity (e.g. a Little League game, family picnic, or round of golf), "what's it going to be like?" Of course, born and raised in Chicago, I know how unpredictable the weather can often be. Years later, while living in Boston, I recall an elderly woman who called the meteorologist at a local television station to complain that "I now have four inches of `partly cloudy' in my basement!" In this book, Batten brilliantly achieves two major objectives: To tell a unique "business success story," and in process, thereby to explain why the Weather Channel has become so important to so many people.